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Old 10-20-2013, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Charleston, South Carolina
9,613 posts, read 13,739,339 times
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I applied and got the invite for this forum.

COLUMBIA: ‘Reality Check’ aims to help the Midlands get a grip on growth | Business | The State

Does anyone who isn't a participant want to express any thoughts or ideas that I might be able to pass along?
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Old 10-20-2013, 11:22 AM
 
91 posts, read 114,655 times
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Things I think are important

1. Growth in existing footprint vs. continuing to expand outward. The Cross Hill and Bull street developments are good examples of this. There are other existing close in retail areas that I'd like to see repurposed and revitalized rather than pushing further out to Killian Rd. and things like that. Downtowns are becoming the place to be again, and Columbia needs to focus there efforts on that.

2. Increase sidewalks, bike lanes, transportation throughout the area. I mentioned in another post about a Vista/Main street dedicated free shuttle. I think downtown should increasingly shift to being less and less car friendly and more focused on feet on the streets. In inner and outer suburbs, there is a huge lack of sidewalks, and I think that should be addressed. People need to realize that you don't have to drive your car everywhere you go.

3. I'm not as familiar with how the counties interact with each other, but there should be a group of leaders from all relevant counties that works on cooperating to bring business and transportation to the region. The article mentions how fragmented the Southwest airlines bid was. Hopefully this has been corrected. If not it should be.
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Old 10-20-2013, 06:45 PM
 
975 posts, read 998,595 times
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I'd echo SteelCity's
"1. Growth in existing footprint vs. continuing to expand outward. The Cross Hill and Bull street developments are good examples of this. There are other existing close in retail areas that I'd like to see repurposed and revitalized rather than pushing further out to Killian Rd. and things like that. Downtowns are becoming the place to be again, and Columbia needs to focus there efforts on that."

And add that maybe a Greenbelt should be established to discourage development/sprawl outside of a certain defined core metro area.
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Old 10-20-2013, 07:23 PM
 
258 posts, read 379,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knightsen View Post
How does the city really force growth into the city. A new manufacturing plant isn't going to locate in the city, they are going to go out in the Blyewood area and other more rural areas. It makes sense for employees to locate closer to the plants and offices they work in.
Many companies don't want to locate in the city so they don't have to deal with traffic, parking, longer drives, greater potential to be a victim of a crime like that USC student, etc.
It seems like you want to force the demand for the city. There is some increased demand to be in the city but most people and companies want to be out in the suburbs.
Crime happens everywhere, that's a fact. It's also a fact that class a office and industrial space in the city is tighter than it's ever been. Also Columbia was the fastest growing city in the state over that last 10 years so I wouldn't say that "most people" want to be in the suburbs.
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Old 10-20-2013, 08:42 PM
 
29,712 posts, read 27,143,552 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knightsen View Post
How does the city really force growth into the city. A new manufacturing plant isn't going to locate in the city, they are going to go out in the Blyewood area and other more rural areas. It makes sense for employees to locate closer to the plants and offices they work in.
Many companies don't want to locate in the city so they don't have to deal with traffic, parking, longer drives, greater potential to be a victim of a crime like that USC student, etc.
It seems like you want to force the demand for the city. There is some increased demand to be in the city but most people and companies want to be out in the suburbs.
Not "force demand" for the city, but the city can and should become more competitive with the 'burbs by doing things like speeding up the permitting process and coordinating some functions along those lines. Of course a huge plant won't likely locate in the city, but having them in the core of the metro--like Nephron and Amazon just across the river in the Saxe-Gotha Industrial Park--is definitely a plus.
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Old 10-20-2013, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Charleston, South Carolina
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Even the towns in the suburbs can grow more wisely than just sprawling out all over the place. No one is suggesting that manufacturing plants shouldn't want to locate in the Blythewoods around the metro, although when the penny sales tax allows for the extension of Shop Road south of Columbia, a lot of land down there will be opened up for such things.

The forum involves all counties of the Midlands and will include issues such as mass transit/commuter rail, etc. It goes without saying that the population of the current suburban towns will continue to grow. Those towns in and of themselves, though, would be wise to grow with a plan as part of a larger plan. And we don't need suburbia sprawling out to kingdom come beyond the existing outer ring and messing up the small town atmospheres of the Newberrys, Winnsboros, etc.
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Old 10-22-2013, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Charleston, South Carolina
9,613 posts, read 13,739,339 times
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I've just returned from the event. It was interesting walking around looking at each table's results for how each team decided as a group they want the Midlands region to grow. On most maps it was clear that the city of Columbia should get the largest amount of growth, but one map was especially decentralized with even grown all over the region.

The key note speaker at lunch, after the maps were "drawn," sang my song from the beginning to the end of his speech. He is world-renowned as an urban planner and innovator. He painted a clear picture of the future being one of largely, if not mostly, households of single people. The business park model is yesterday. Young people are choosing where they want to live and worrying about getting a job once they get there.

Continuing with his words, RTP is going back to the drawing board because young people no longer want to work and live there because of its suburban design. The Triangle is going urban. Atlanta can't right its wrongs in two years, but they are devising a new plan to reinvent the city and region. Whichever cities don't want high-density rental housing will lose young people to cities that embrace that new model. Single family housing with a couple and 2.2 children is another "yesterday" concept. There will be exceptions, of course, but the bulk of who moves to cities and makes them vibrant will be young people and empty-nesters who don't care about schools outside of the fact that any city and region needs good schools to thrive. Sprawl is over. Whatever city/region doesn't get that and looks like anywhere USA in the next 20 years will be bypassed by the next generation and beyond.

He used a convincing Powerpoint presentation to back up his words. The writing is on the wall pure and simple.
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Old 10-22-2013, 02:23 PM
912
 
1,531 posts, read 2,614,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Columbiadata View Post
I've just returned from the event. It was interesting walking around looking at each table's results for how each team decided as a group they want the Midlands region to grow. On most maps it was clear that the city of Columbia should get the largest amount of growth, but one map was especially decentralized with even grown all over the region.

The key note speaker at lunch, after the maps were "drawn," sang my song from the beginning to the end of his speech. He is world-renowned as an urban planner and innovator. He painted a clear picture of the future being one of largely, if not mostly, households of single people. The business park model is yesterday. Young people are choosing where they want to live and worrying about getting a job once they get there.

Continuing with his words, RTP is going back to the drawing board because young people no longer want to work and live there because of its suburban design. The Triangle is going urban. Atlanta can't right its wrongs in two years, but they are devising a new plan to reinvent the city and region. Whichever cities don't want high-density rental housing will lose young people to cities that embrace that new model. Single family housing with a couple and 2.2 children is another "yesterday" concept. There will be exceptions, of course, but the bulk of who moves to cities and makes them vibrant will be young people and empty-nesters who don't care about schools outside of the fact that any city and region needs good schools to thrive. Sprawl is over. Whatever city/region doesn't get that and looks like anywhere USA in the next 20 years will be bypassed by the next generation and beyond.

He used a convincing Powerpoint presentation to back up his words. The writing is on the wall pure and simple.
The bold comment is plain scary. That is pretty much a clarion call to the death of the American paradigm.

The "young" do not make up as much of the population as one may think, nor are they that creative or innovative. Most getting out of school can't find jobs (thanks Barry! ). They're not more intelligent; if anything, they're more spoiled & have more of a sense of entitlement.

Here's a tip: Most cities lose their young people anyway! Where do they go? To other cities. Things have a way of netting themselves out. Yes, I do think many cities will infill in their cores & that will attract youth (and crime), nothing new here. But at some point, people change. We want wives & kids. We want a lawn to play with out children on & to maintain. We want good schools away from the crime that (will always) inhabit inner cities. Yes, weekends are about massive consumerism at the suburban town centers.

Those that preach at the altar of the rise of the cities tend to be leftists who are simply infusing their politics with their theories about how we should "collectively" live. Not for me, Comrade.
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Old 10-22-2013, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Charleston, South Carolina
9,613 posts, read 13,739,339 times
Reputation: 2082
Quote:
Originally Posted by 912 View Post
The bold comment is plain scary. That is pretty much a clarion call to the death of the American paradigm.

The "young" do not make up as much of the population as one may think, nor are they that creative or innovative. Most getting out of school can't find jobs (thanks Barry! ). They're not more intelligent; if anything, they're more spoiled & have more of a sense of entitlement.

Here's a tip: Most cities lose their young people anyway! Where do they go? To other cities. Things have a way of netting themselves out. Yes, I do think many cities will infill in their cores & that will attract youth (and crime), nothing new here. But at some point, people change. We want wives & kids. We want a lawn to play with out children on & to maintain. We want good schools away from the crime that (will always) inhabit inner cities. Yes, weekends are about massive consumerism at the suburban town centers.

Those that preach at the altar of the rise of the cities tend to be leftists who are simply infusing their politics with their theories about how we should "collectively" live. Not for me, Comrade.
More of the same ol' same 'ol. Birth rates are declining, young people are delaying marriage, and crime is everywhere. The brightest college grads will have employment or start their own businesses, and while there will always be many who leave where they were raised or went to college, successful cities will find a way to retain a fair share of them - notably through providing the type of housing and opportunities that demographic seeks. And when they finally decide to settle down and start families, they'll look around at their peers with six-year-olds a few years later and ask among themselves: why leave for the burbs? We can make schools good right here.
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Old 10-22-2013, 02:43 PM
 
780 posts, read 1,199,606 times
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Hmmmm. Interesting. I've become somewhat more interested in the topic of urban and suburban development over the last few years, maybe because I'm now married with a child (and another one on the way), and am more concerned than ever with the quality of schools, having a yard for the kids to play in, etc. I've recently stumbled onto the writing and research of Joel Kotkin, here's an article he wrote on the subject a few weeks ago:

America's Fastest-Growing Counties: The 'Burbs Are Back | Joel Kotkin
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