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Old 04-29-2011, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
7,141 posts, read 4,108,731 times
Reputation: 2413
Quote:
Originally Posted by westcoast30 View Post
It is quite as grey as Pittsburgh. The OP thought Pittsburgh was grey year-round. Cleveland, Columbus, Pittsburgh, Erie, Buffalo, Syracuse and Scranton (along with smaller towns in OH, PA, NY, VT, NH, WV) rank next to the Pacific Northwest in terms of cloudy days and sunshine hours. The skies are pretty much the same in those specifically listed cities. DC and the coastal areas have more sunshine in the winter. If Columbus had 145 cloudy days one year, then so did Pittsburgh (or was close). They all tend to get that "Great Lakes" effect in terms of clouds. Also, I don't know how long the OP has lived outside Pgh. The city once used to be covered in black smoke but those days are gone.

jbcmh81 - You think people assume that it's overcast in the Upper Midwest/Northeast year-round and that they are incorrect. However, it is overcast frequently year-round. Most days in the late spring, summer, early fall tend to have variable sky conditions all in one day. So you often go from say a clear morning to increasing clouds then to complete "overcast" then the clouds break and before you know it it's nighttime. You don't go weeks without ever having cloud-cover or even a 100% cloudy day. If it ever happened, it's rare and the news stations comment on it. Sometimes a bad system can hold in the summer and you're left with an entire week of overcast skies and no sun. I'm not sure about Columbus, but it definitely occurs in Scranton. 7 straight days of mostly sunny skies doesn't occur often.

Other weather conditions: Columbus may very well have less snow or a slightly milder winter. I don't know. Maybe winters aren't quite as hazardous as Pgh because Columbus is flat. But when you look at cloud-cover data no matter what year the two cities are way more similar than not for cloudy days and "grey." If you want to compare Pgh and Philly, then yes there's a difference in cloud-cover and sunshine.
Scranton is neither Midwest nor Great Lakes. It is Eastern. That said, there are very few locations on the entire continent that go weeks at a time with nothing but sun. I looked at Denver's stats. They often have about 4 days a month that are defined by the NWS as "clear". Another 6-9 overcast, and the rest where there are clouds at least part of the day. I think your definition of a sunny day differs from both mine and the NWS.

Columbus averages 28" of snow a winter, less than Pittsburgh and about half that of Denver.
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Old 04-29-2011, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Corona, CA
137 posts, read 112,418 times
Reputation: 102
Talking Scranton is much cloudier than Philly and Columbus and Pitt are Very Similar

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Scranton is neither Midwest nor Great Lakes. It is Eastern. That said, there are very few locations on the entire continent that go weeks at a time with nothing but sun. I looked at Denver's stats. They often have about 4 days a month that are defined by the NWS as "clear". Another 6-9 overcast, and the rest where there are clouds at least part of the day. I think your definition of a sunny day differs from both mine and the NWS.

Columbus averages 28" of snow a winter, less than Pittsburgh and about half that of Denver.
Due to the location of Scranton in the mountains it's winter sunshine hours are closer to that of Pittsburgh's than Philly's or NYC's. It's definitely grey there. Unless you live in Harrisburg or Philly, most of PA has a lot of cloudy days with only the Pacific NW being cloudier. Also, here's the NWS average number of cloudy days (varies year to year):

Columbus - 190 cloudy days
Pittsburgh - 203 cloudy days

13 days difference. That's pretty much one additional cloudy day/per month in Pgh than Columbus. But they're so close that on any given year Columbus can have the same amount of cloudy days as Pgh. Heck, you can just take a look at the week's forecast between the two cities:

Between Sat April 30 - Sun May 8
Columbus: 3 partly cloudy days and 6 days of overcast and rain
Pittsburgh: 1 mostly sunny day, 2 partly cloudy days, 1 day with AM rain and PM sun, and the rest are rainy and overcast.
*Pgh looks a tad bit sunnier for this upcoming 10-day forecast according to weather.com.

And for the last time, the OP thought Pgh was grey. Columbus isn't much sunnier. That's the reality.

Side note: There are 115 totally clear days in Denver, CO on average per year. Very minimal 100% cloudy days (sunrise to sunset) like the ones you see on many many many days in the Upper Midwest / Northeast region and Pacific NW.
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Old 04-29-2011, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Tualatin, Oregon
617 posts, read 801,033 times
Reputation: 342
Quote:
Originally Posted by westcoast30 View Post
most of PA has a lot of cloudy days with only the Pacific NW being cloudier.
OK, but our beer is better
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Old 05-04-2011, 11:23 PM
 
28 posts, read 53,701 times
Reputation: 15
Whoa! I haven't checked the site in a while and am kinda surprised to see how this thread has grown! I never intended to start a weather debate - I KNOW the midwest is grey. My husband and I grew up there! I was hoping that maybe, just maybe there was someone who had experience in Pittsburgh AND Columbus and could say, "Yeah, Columbus is grey but it isn't quite as bad as Pittsburgh." But it looks like they are pretty much the same, which is why I'm nervous! I've been watching the weather forecasts the last few weeks and they are giving me a dose of reality, too. This week Columbus and Pittsburgh forecasts are almost identical, low to mid 60s with one day just barely hitting 70, with rain or clouds almost every day. Denver shows happy little sunshines every single day this week, in the mid-70s and hitting almost 80 at the end of the week.

Just as a sidenote, I think posting stats from the NWS or any other weather source don't really give the full picture. For example, "cloudy" means something completely different here than back east. A "cloudy" day here usually means clear blue skies in the morning, a few passing clouds at some point during the day (sometimes with showers), and then sunny 'til nightfall. In Pittsburgh, 8 out of 10 times, "cloudy" means completely overcast with no sign of the sun. You often go weeks without seeing the sun, and that just doesn't happen here. That's why snow doesn't lay around for months on end here, either. The sun comes out and melts it.

And, as Sandhill said (hey, you're in Littleton! We are right around the corner in Highlands Ranch.), the weather here does have other kinds of negatives. I have dry eye syndrome now, plus sun spots on my eyeballs (not real noticeable, but odd nonetheless), both my kids and I have eczema now that is way worse than anything I had back east, and we have to use TONS of moisturizer and drink loads of water constantly, run humidifiers, etc.) However, I have to disagree with sandhill on the "feel" of the seasons. I think the seasons are great here and still feel the "spring" feeling of winter ending and more people being outside. If the dryness were just a LITTLE less severe, I think the climate here would be perfect.

I know a few have commented on weather not being that big a deal, but it is not just a backdrop for me. It affects EVERY ASPECT of daily life. My mother passed away from breast cancer at a younger age than most, which sparked a major interest in health for me. I have done boatloads of research on what causes cancer and how to stay healthy, and believe me when I say that sun is a major factor. Not only do we need it to make Vitamin D, which is essential for our immune system to function properly (do you know that they are finding that people in the midwest are all vit. d deficient? Pittsburgh is #2 in the nation for Vit. D deficiency), but people are naturally more active when they can be outdoors in the sunshine. Everyone here is always outside running, biking, etc. I RARELY saw that in PA - even in the summers, it was so humid it was uncomfortable to be outside for any length of time.

I'll tell you, what is concerning me even more is what some of you are saying about pollution and a toxic environment in the Columbus area. I saw some articles about strange cancer clusters popping up in Ohio, and have been trying to research that further but am finding conflicting information. Western PA used to have one of the highest cancer rates in the country also, but it may have evened out a bit by now. When I looked up breast cancer rates in Colorado, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, it looked like Ohio was the lowest which seemed strange to me. I would love more info. on THAT if anyone has it...

I do appreciate all the comments - thanks!
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Old 05-05-2011, 12:31 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
7,141 posts, read 4,108,731 times
Reputation: 2413
Quote:
Originally Posted by westcoast30 View Post
Due to the location of Scranton in the mountains it's winter sunshine hours are closer to that of Pittsburgh's than Philly's or NYC's. It's definitely grey there. Unless you live in Harrisburg or Philly, most of PA has a lot of cloudy days with only the Pacific NW being cloudier. Also, here's the NWS average number of cloudy days (varies year to year):

Columbus - 190 cloudy days
Pittsburgh - 203 cloudy days

13 days difference. That's pretty much one additional cloudy day/per month in Pgh than Columbus. But they're so close that on any given year Columbus can have the same amount of cloudy days as Pgh. Heck, you can just take a look at the week's forecast between the two cities:

Between Sat April 30 - Sun May 8
Columbus: 3 partly cloudy days and 6 days of overcast and rain
Pittsburgh: 1 mostly sunny day, 2 partly cloudy days, 1 day with AM rain and PM sun, and the rest are rainy and overcast.
*Pgh looks a tad bit sunnier for this upcoming 10-day forecast according to weather.com.

And for the last time, the OP thought Pgh was grey. Columbus isn't much sunnier. That's the reality.

Side note: There are 115 totally clear days in Denver, CO on average per year. Very minimal 100% cloudy days (sunrise to sunset) like the ones you see on many many many days in the Upper Midwest / Northeast region and Pacific NW.
I don't think you can use this year's weather right now. It has been historically bad in the entire East, with superoutbreaks of tornadoes, record rainfalls from Arkansas through the Northeast... it's just not typical.
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Old 05-05-2011, 12:33 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
7,141 posts, read 4,108,731 times
Reputation: 2413
Quote:
Originally Posted by COscrapper View Post
Whoa! I haven't checked the site in a while and am kinda surprised to see how this thread has grown! I never intended to start a weather debate - I KNOW the midwest is grey. My husband and I grew up there! I was hoping that maybe, just maybe there was someone who had experience in Pittsburgh AND Columbus and could say, "Yeah, Columbus is grey but it isn't quite as bad as Pittsburgh." But it looks like they are pretty much the same, which is why I'm nervous! I've been watching the weather forecasts the last few weeks and they are giving me a dose of reality, too. This week Columbus and Pittsburgh forecasts are almost identical, low to mid 60s with one day just barely hitting 70, with rain or clouds almost every day. Denver shows happy little sunshines every single day this week, in the mid-70s and hitting almost 80 at the end of the week.

Just as a sidenote, I think posting stats from the NWS or any other weather source don't really give the full picture. For example, "cloudy" means something completely different here than back east. A "cloudy" day here usually means clear blue skies in the morning, a few passing clouds at some point during the day (sometimes with showers), and then sunny 'til nightfall. In Pittsburgh, 8 out of 10 times, "cloudy" means completely overcast with no sign of the sun. You often go weeks without seeing the sun, and that just doesn't happen here. That's why snow doesn't lay around for months on end here, either. The sun comes out and melts it.

And, as Sandhill said (hey, you're in Littleton! We are right around the corner in Highlands Ranch.), the weather here does have other kinds of negatives. I have dry eye syndrome now, plus sun spots on my eyeballs (not real noticeable, but odd nonetheless), both my kids and I have eczema now that is way worse than anything I had back east, and we have to use TONS of moisturizer and drink loads of water constantly, run humidifiers, etc.) However, I have to disagree with sandhill on the "feel" of the seasons. I think the seasons are great here and still feel the "spring" feeling of winter ending and more people being outside. If the dryness were just a LITTLE less severe, I think the climate here would be perfect.

I know a few have commented on weather not being that big a deal, but it is not just a backdrop for me. It affects EVERY ASPECT of daily life. My mother passed away from breast cancer at a younger age than most, which sparked a major interest in health for me. I have done boatloads of research on what causes cancer and how to stay healthy, and believe me when I say that sun is a major factor. Not only do we need it to make Vitamin D, which is essential for our immune system to function properly (do you know that they are finding that people in the midwest are all vit. d deficient? Pittsburgh is #2 in the nation for Vit. D deficiency), but people are naturally more active when they can be outdoors in the sunshine. Everyone here is always outside running, biking, etc. I RARELY saw that in PA - even in the summers, it was so humid it was uncomfortable to be outside for any length of time.

I'll tell you, what is concerning me even more is what some of you are saying about pollution and a toxic environment in the Columbus area. I saw some articles about strange cancer clusters popping up in Ohio, and have been trying to research that further but am finding conflicting information. Western PA used to have one of the highest cancer rates in the country also, but it may have evened out a bit by now. When I looked up breast cancer rates in Colorado, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, it looked like Ohio was the lowest which seemed strange to me. I would love more info. on THAT if anyone has it...

I do appreciate all the comments - thanks!
Honestly, if you're going to be that paranoid to be trying to find things wrong here, then just don't move. Tell your spouse that you refuse and just stay there.
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Old 05-05-2011, 01:15 AM
 
298 posts, read 218,384 times
Reputation: 290
im originally from denver and i would rate columbus as a much better place to live when taking everything into account. i love denver..love the mountains etc but im alot happier in columbus right now..i miss the broncos alot too
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Old 05-05-2011, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Bexley, OH
111 posts, read 186,424 times
Reputation: 41
I think you have a good idea what you will be dealing with in terms of weather differences. Winter here can certainly be gray and overcast for days on end and I do know two people who utilize light therapy machines to abate seasonal depression but that is only for winter and maybe early spring. Mid-spring through fall there is plenty of sun and clear days. There are many outdoor activities in and around Columbus including a fantastic metroparks system: Metro Parks - Central Ohio Park System - Homepage

From your original post it seemed like you were wondering if it would be a good move for your entire family and to that I can give you a resounding thumbs up! I am consistently amazed at how family friendly Columbus is and so are friends who have come to visit us. All through summer and fall there are outdoor festivals downtown and in the townships including Art (and wine!) Festivals, Jazz & Blues Festivals, Greek Festival, ComFest (a local event you have to see to believe), a great 4th of July show... there are probably three or four each month! Columbus Ohio Festivals Information.

Another plus is that there is a phenomenal Children's Hospital here. I know there is also one in Denver but that is something you would not lose access to in a move to Columbus.
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Old 05-05-2011, 10:59 AM
 
26 posts, read 36,164 times
Reputation: 17
For what one person's anecdotal evidence is worth, I have a friend who grew up in Pittsburgh and who now lives here in Columbus, and who says that Columbus is somewhat less cloudy and gray than Pittsburgh. Something about the hills of PGH vs. the flatness of Columbus, is her theory. Anyway, it is (finally) bright and sunny here today!

The OP should come to Columbus and stay for a week -- in that amount of time, especially this time of year, you'll get a decent taste for the different variations in the weather here.
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Old 05-06-2011, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Tualatin, Oregon
617 posts, read 801,033 times
Reputation: 342
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Honestly, if you're going to be that paranoid to be trying to find things wrong here, then just don't move. Tell your spouse that you refuse and just stay there.
The OP doesn't sounds paranoid to me, just trying to weigh all the factors and make the best decision for the family.

One thing that I think has gone largely unsaid in all of these "should I move to XXX?" threads is with the economy and the real estate market. In the past decade, with a healthy economy and a rising real estate market, it was easier to take a chance on relocation. Things are much different now and I think it is perfectly natural for people to weigh the factors very carefully because once you leap (move to a new city, start a new career with new connections, get your family integrated with the community, buy a home, etc.), it's tougher to pull back.
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