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Old 09-27-2011, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
7,818 posts, read 5,126,902 times
Reputation: 2671

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Quote:
Originally Posted by funkenstein91 View Post
No, Cleveland doesn't have less sprawl because it's older, it has less sprawl because most of the cities in the metro aren't really suburbs, they're actual urban cities that just happen to be near Cleveland. They would be there even if Cleveland never existed. That's not true of the Columbus suburbs. They are commuter towns, which is what constitutes sprawl.

Honestly, I don't see why you can't understand the strip mall thing either. Every single person I've ever had visit here has noted the high concentration of strip malls with or without prior knowledge of city. It's not like we're making crap up to insult the city. I really like it here, but I can easily see where the city gets its reputation.
Oh, that explains it. Cleveland's suburbs existed for some time, so the growth that occurred around them is not sprawl. But wait... Dublin, Westerville, Canal Winchester, Grove City, Hilliard, etc are all old towns that would be there even if Columbus never existed. So the only difference is when that growth around them occurred, and the only reason there is that difference is because Columbus and its metro have been growing the last 50 years, and Cleveland and its metro have been doing the opposite. So what's the real difference here? Sprawl is not sprawl anymore because it's aged sprawl? Makes no logical sense to me. The bottom line here is that Columbus takes criticism for being successful, and some people have a problem with success when their own backyard hasn't been seeing it. It is not because Columbus is different then they are in a real, tangible way, but because it is arbitrarily held to a different standard. That is unfair and dishonest.
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Old 09-28-2011, 01:17 AM
 
328 posts, read 279,338 times
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i think we have to consider that a lot of people actually prefer newer subdivisions to live..perhaps the appeal of a columbus or charlotte or austin to most ppl moving there isnt the eclectic urban districts but the newly built suburbs..it can get depressing in older cities like cleveland,detroit, parts of new jersey..where there are brownfields everywhere..is it really an insult to say that indianapolis and raleigh and columbus have abundant farmland in the msa..is that less desirable than abandoned chemical plants and factories?having said that i prefer dense urban settings..manhattan is my fav place on earth
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Old 09-28-2011, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
7,818 posts, read 5,126,902 times
Reputation: 2671
Quote:
Originally Posted by chet_kinkaid View Post
i think we have to consider that a lot of people actually prefer newer subdivisions to live..perhaps the appeal of a columbus or charlotte or austin to most ppl moving there isnt the eclectic urban districts but the newly built suburbs..it can get depressing in older cities like cleveland,detroit, parts of new jersey..where there are brownfields everywhere..is it really an insult to say that indianapolis and raleigh and columbus have abundant farmland in the msa..is that less desirable than abandoned chemical plants and factories?having said that i prefer dense urban settings..manhattan is my fav place on earth
I think that older development can be just as attractive as new provided it is maintained, but that's not the debate. It's the idea that old sprawl is not sprawl. It absolutely is. Columbus should not be singled out for being successful enough to have that sprawl just be newer than in some other cities.
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,548 posts, read 5,071,600 times
Reputation: 1293
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
The Nazareth Deli has awesome fries. Used to eat there all the time when I worked on Westerville Rd. There is also a great Cuban place in old Hilliard.

I wonder if these ethnic places exist in older buildings simply because the rent tends to be much less expensive than in brand-new locations. I remember reading about Great Western shopping plaza near Hilltop. Built in the 1950s, it was one of Columbus' first strip malls. It was filled with chain stores of the era. Now it is mostly empty, but what is left is a mix of chain and small businesses.
i think affordable rent is a significant reason for it. Some of it may also be that the stores and restaurants opened in places in the city where the immigrant population is (or was).
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,548 posts, read 5,071,600 times
Reputation: 1293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momotaro View Post
Kihachi is still alive and kicking.
That's it! I need to look them up the next time I'm in town. For some reason, I thought they had shut down...glad to hear they're still there.
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Old 09-29-2011, 11:03 AM
 
Location: cleveland
1,128 posts, read 2,038,447 times
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chet, my bad.. let me be more specific. what i meant was the "developed/urban" areas of cleveland and cincy are much larger. and those older/urban areas expand much farther then they do in columbus. as you drive thru columbus you reach newer development/less urban areas faster than you do driving the equal distances in cleve or cincy. i was not talking population. sorry for not being more clear on my comment.
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Old 09-29-2011, 11:16 AM
 
Location: cleveland
1,128 posts, read 2,038,447 times
Reputation: 524
jbc, noooo, i didnt say that . you assumed that all by yourself. the ops question is referring to "columbus giant suburb perception" see post #1.. imo people from older cities, think the newer cities like columbus,indy etc are mostly suburban-looking is because thats what our 2nd,3rd and surrounding counties suburbs/development looks like. ie- strongsville or mentor come to mind. follow me?
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Old 09-29-2011, 11:34 AM
 
Location: cleveland
1,128 posts, read 2,038,447 times
Reputation: 524
chet, i agree. older cities have more sprawl than the new cities. in the older cities its old spawl,new sprawl and newer sprawl.... i think i will start a new thread > " columbus, 50% ya'll talk with a dra'll and talk about spra'll??
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Old 09-29-2011, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
1,860 posts, read 2,763,165 times
Reputation: 1574
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
So, after starting this thread, and reading this thread...it sounds like most of what people say about Columbus being suburban-like and sprawly, actually is the reality than....lol

Although, I do gotta say, I do like some of the housing styles that I see in Columbus while browsing around on google maps!
The neighborhoods adjacent to downtown are urban and have lots of character. In fact Columbus has a couple of the best urban districts in Ohio. However, these are only a small fraction of the larger metro area which tends to be sprawling and suburban oriented. Once you get beyond the immediate ring of core neighborhoods it lives up to its reputation. Also, downtown Columbus is not the greatest.
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Old 09-29-2011, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
7,818 posts, read 5,126,902 times
Reputation: 2671
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1watertiger View Post
jbc, noooo, i didnt say that . you assumed that all by yourself. the ops question is referring to "columbus giant suburb perception" see post #1.. imo people from older cities, think the newer cities like columbus,indy etc are mostly suburban-looking is because thats what our 2nd,3rd and surrounding counties suburbs/development looks like. ie- strongsville or mentor come to mind. follow me?
That is basically saying that the people in older cities are hypocrites for ignoring their own sprawl, no matter the age. I get what you're saying, but I still think the belief about Columbus is unfair given the reality that exists.
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