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Old 04-23-2013, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,831,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zen_master View Post
I don't know that Columbus really offers much more by way of business than any other city in Ohio. Toledo and Cleveland have the lake. Cincinnati has the river and the rest are connected to some extent by highway or rail. And with those resources aside every metro is competing to attract business and jobs with special tax deals and grace periods, etc. With such fierce competition for business and the playing field being at relative parity I don't see Columbus becoming a hub even though the poster above is correct that the West Coast ports of LA and San Fran are losing traffic to Charleston SC.

I think what will result in growth in Columbus is the seemingly unstoppable growth in the size of government. The last 5 years since the Great Recession have seen business take it on the chin while government has continued to lurch forward and increase in size. As more and more state resources are rationed away from many other state universities and into OSU, and the big pension funds (OPERS, STRS, SERS, Ohio Highway Pension) continue to see their significance increase, as well as simply more businesses locating nearer to the capital for influence on the legislature (lobbyists) to gain appropriations of state funds we'll continue to see Columbus grow. This appears, to me at least, to be the one definitive edge Columbus has over other Ohio cities. Not saying it will power Columbus to overtake Cincinnati and Cleveland but it is a driver that these other two can't claim to possess.
Government jobs in Columbus have recovered, but they're hardly the only industry that has grown from its recession bottom, and it's not the industry that's recovered the strongest.

These are from the low points in 2010 to March 2013.

1. Health and Education: 14.4%
2. Manufacturing: 12.6%
3. Leisure and Hospitality: 12.2%
4. Professional and Business Services: 10.2%
5. Government: 7.1%
6. Financial Services: 4.8%
7. Trade, Transportation, Utilities: 3.5%
8. Other Services: 1.7%
9. Information: -0.6%

Total Non-Farm Jobs: 6.7%

It's barely above the industry average for the Columbus metro. I wouldn't say it's unstoppable, and just seems to be in line with the overall local economy.
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Old 04-23-2013, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,389 posts, read 3,724,973 times
Reputation: 1764
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
Hey, Dayton is basically in the same geographic location as Columbus, plus 75 runs through it, along with the Great Miami River. That could make it the next powerhouse too, right?...
Quote:
Originally Posted by motorman View Post
Sure could! In fact, the good citizens of Cincinnati have seen the light and are now reopening the canal between the Ohio River and Dayton. A shipment of keelboats will soon follow and a linkup with the Scioto in Columbus will undoubtedly be next. ("Port cities," ALL!)
Quote:
Originally Posted by OHKID View Post
Unreasonable response...
Oh,really? Considering that Natural510's optimistic predictions about Dayton probably weren't serious certainly begged for some added humor, I think. And, in your conclusions about the Panama Canal expansion's impact upon Columbus, you've omitted the fact that much of such cargo (bulk or otherwise) will travel, via New Orleans, up and down the Mississippi/Ohio River systems and be handled by inland port cities like Cincinnati, with its vital connection to I-75, one of the most heavily-used freight corridors in the nation.
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Old 04-23-2013, 07:40 AM
 
146 posts, read 287,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motorman View Post
Oh,really? Considering that Natural510's optimistic predictions about Dayton probably weren't serious certainly begged for some added humor, I think. And, in your conclusions about the Panama Canal expansion's impact upon Columbus, you've omitted the fact that much of such cargo (bulk or otherwise) will travel, via New Orleans, up and down the Mississippi/Ohio River systems and be handled by inland port cities like Cincinnati, with its vital connection to I-75, one of the most heavily-used freight corridors in the nation.
Incorrect, the Panama Canal expansion has had a huge impact on freight rail traffic on East coast ports, not New Orleans. The CSX National Gateway runs through NW ohio and Norfolk Southern's Heartland Corridor lines run through Columbus. Both being fed by East coast port cities. Combine this with intersecting interstates and cheap land for warehousing and you can see why Columbus is a great location for logistics operations.

As far as the "Mega-City", uh probably not in my life time. Columbus is growing, but not that fast, I just hope that it is growing in a sustainable healthy way. It appears there is quite a bit of developer land grabbing going on downtown right now. That being said, it is a great place to live. (* usual disclaimer, not Utopia, or Chicago, nor does it have the night life of Miami beach, ect, ect, ect......*)
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Old 04-23-2013, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,389 posts, read 3,724,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by other1 View Post
Incorrect, the Panama Canal expansion has had a huge impact on freight rail traffic on East coast ports, not New Orleans. The CSX National Gateway runs through NW ohio and Norfolk Southern's Heartland Corridor lines run through Columbus. Both being fed by East coast port cities. Combine this with intersecting interstates and cheap land for warehousing and you can see why Columbus is a great location for logistics operations...
No wish here to minimize either Columbus' strategic rail connections to East Coast port cities or the metro's capacity to warehouse such increased trade--but please don't you minimize the importance of the bulk river trade emanating from New Orleans--especially since it hasn't even really begun.
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Old 04-23-2013, 11:13 AM
 
146 posts, read 287,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motorman View Post
but please don't you minimize the importance of the bulk river trade emanating from New Orleans--especially since it hasn't even really begun.
I didn't
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Old 04-23-2013, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,389 posts, read 3,724,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by other1 View Post
I didn't
You're safe--what you don't know won't hurt you...
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Old 04-23-2013, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,277 posts, read 4,076,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJC99 View Post
I guess there needs to be a definite definition of "Mega-City" then. If we are talking 5 million+ in the city limits = mega city, and NYC is the only US city that meets that criteria, then columbus will never be a mega-city. If you include the surrounding areas, a la LA, Dallas, Chicago, atlanta, etc. - i still don't know if Columbus would ever become one. Frankly, I don't know if it should become one.

Regarding the infrastructure part of my remarks - as most of us know, there's been a big push of rejuvenation/expansion to the downtown area for the last few years by Mayor Coleman. IMO, if he had his sights on something like NYC, chicago, Atlanta, the projects that have/will happen would be drastically different. Example - Columbus Commons. the apartments, businesses, etc that are being built now wouldn't be 6-7 stories, they would have been 12, 15, 20 stories high. If you want/need a mega-city-esque core that resembles the big US cities, that's not going to happen with 6-8 story buildings. and it will only encourage more sprawl into the suburbs. I would like to NOT see 10+ story buildings in Arlington, clintonville, German village, OTE, etc. (and further out to the Dublins, hilliards, Reynoldsburgs, etc.) Also, the highway construction that is going on now in no way would be able to support a 5-10million resident city. Frankly, I don't even know if it will support what we have now, but we will see.

Of course, i know there's plenty of tall buildings downtown, and even outside of downtown. But i'm referring to the current and future developments. Again, it's just my opinion. I have only visited, briefly, cities like Chicago, Atlanta, boston, and Dallas. Not NYC or LA. but my visits were not long enough to know what works/doesn't work to create mega-city-esque cities. (though, I DO know mass transit like subways greatly help)

Tall buildings does make a city lively or a"real city" Many large cities in Europe do not have density or excitement due to tall buildings.

On the contrary, some of the most depressing/bland/and boring streetscapes in the US are cities with "tall highrises" that have no street life on the ground level.

In downtown Columbus this occures. Look at the Nationwide Plaza as an example. The building has no ground floor retail, is very tall, but lacks interaction with the street. This doesn't add to the vitality of the city, it takes away from it.

On the other hand some of the most active, dense, and interesting areas of urban Columbus, and many other cities, are areas with a mix of midrise and highrise buildings (combined with some low rise homes) and ground floor retail. The idea that a "big city" must have tall buildings everywhere isn't true.
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Old 04-23-2013, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,389 posts, read 3,724,973 times
Reputation: 1764
You're gonna hate me, streetcreed, for playfully but honestly disagreeing with you from afar. Driving in from the south (via I-71), Columbus possesses one of the most magical mid-sized city skylines there is... (And this comment comes from "a Cincinnatian," no less!)
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Old 04-23-2013, 07:39 PM
 
Location: OH
688 posts, read 868,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Government jobs in Columbus have recovered, but they're hardly the only industry that has grown from its recession bottom, and it's not the industry that's recovered the strongest.

These are from the low points in 2010 to March 2013.

1. Health and Education: 14.4%
2. Manufacturing: 12.6%
3. Leisure and Hospitality: 12.2%
4. Professional and Business Services: 10.2%
5. Government: 7.1%
6. Financial Services: 4.8%
7. Trade, Transportation, Utilities: 3.5%
8. Other Services: 1.7%
9. Information: -0.6%

Total Non-Farm Jobs: 6.7%

It's barely above the industry average for the Columbus metro. I wouldn't say it's unstoppable, and just seems to be in line with the overall local economy.
Good data and thank you for posting it. In many ways you make my point for me. You're exactly right that from nadir to now government hasn't grown as much as other industries in Columbus and that's because government was never impacted as much. It didn't experience the draw down that say unskilled labor experienced or the crushing blow that befell manufacturing in Ohio. To clarify, Columbus has the slow, steady growth in state government as wind at its back and this is something unique to Columbus over 'rival' cities in Ohio.

PS: I wish the data above distinguished between healthcare and education rather than lumping them together. Education, being a state-run institution (K-12 public schools as well as state universities like osu), behave more like government in their employment trends than they mirror private enterprise.
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Old 04-23-2013, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,831,751 times
Reputation: 5473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zen_master View Post
Good data and thank you for posting it. In many ways you make my point for me. You're exactly right that from nadir to now government hasn't grown as much as other industries in Columbus and that's because government was never impacted as much. It didn't experience the draw down that say unskilled labor experienced or the crushing blow that befell manufacturing in Ohio. To clarify, Columbus has the slow, steady growth in state government as wind at its back and this is something unique to Columbus over 'rival' cities in Ohio.

PS: I wish the data above distinguished between healthcare and education rather than lumping them together. Education, being a state-run institution (K-12 public schools as well as state universities like osu), behave more like government in their employment trends than they mirror private enterprise.
You are right that Columbus bucked the trend when it comes to government jobs in Ohio. It did lose about 9,000 government jobs during the recession, but has more than made them all back since then. Cleveland and Cincinnati started losing in 2007-2008 and have more or less continued to decline. I haven't looked at other cities, but I have to wonder if part of this has less to do with Columbus being the capital and more to do with the fact that Columbus is growing vs. the other two. You're probably not going to continuously shrink government with a growing population before you start running into operational issues. I wonder if there's any study out there on how capital cities perform during recessions vs. non-capital cities, but more specifically, how government jobs perform during economic downturns in growing and shrinking cities.

And yes, I wish the BLS separated the Health/Education category as well. In Columbus' case, I suspect the majority of the jobs increase was in the Health section. Almost every area hospital has seen or is going through major expansions, and I know Children's Hospital hired at least a few thousand people alone for their new complex.
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