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Old 06-08-2016, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,766 posts, read 12,748,545 times
Reputation: 5440

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A few more pics from the SN's gritty days. The 2nd picture is from the 1980s, despite is black and white look.
Attached Thumbnails
Skyscrapers in Columbus's Future?-shortnorth6.jpg   Skyscrapers in Columbus's Future?-shortnorth7.jpg   Skyscrapers in Columbus's Future?-shortnorth8.jpg  
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Old 06-26-2016, 09:41 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,576 times
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SkyHouse Cincinnati is very likely to break ground soon. It is a 25-floor tower with approximately 350 luxury apartment units.
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Old 06-30-2016, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,691 posts, read 1,231,527 times
Reputation: 2058
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
A few more pics from the SN's gritty days. The 2nd picture is from the 1980s, despite is black and white look.
Thanks for the pics! Incredibly cool to see how much the SN has changed, especially since I frequent those areas you posted on a daily basis.
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Old 06-30-2016, 06:40 PM
 
860 posts, read 631,209 times
Reputation: 641
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevieb66 View Post
SkyHouse Cincinnati is very likely to break ground soon. It is a 25-floor tower with approximately 350 luxury apartment units.
I'm not impressed with tall buildings anymore. The height of the buildings in the arena district is the way to go, in my opinion.
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Old 07-01-2016, 03:40 PM
 
Location: MPLS
1,064 posts, read 1,031,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerryMason614 View Post
I'm not impressed with tall buildings anymore. The height of the buildings in the arena district is the way to go, in my opinion.
Healthy cities nationwide are building tall residental buildings if they haven't already. It's important that regardless of height that they function well at street level, of course, and don't just offer pedestrians a big blank wall. The problem with Columbus is that it's not building a cluster of five story buildings in lieu of every 20-30 story tower it could/should be building. Columbus won't have as many 20+ story residential buildings as my 1/2 sq mi neighborhood quite possibly for the rest of my life (mid 30s now) and they certainly aren't building enough mid-rises to compensate.

On top of that, there are neighborhoods here where tons of mid-rises have been built such as North Loop, Stadium Village, and the neighborhoods consisting of Uptown, the latter of which has a greenway with a long continous stretch of mid-rise apartments with no equivalent in Columbus, namely the Olentangy Trail which has not seen similar development. Maybe rebrand it as the Olentangy Greenway?

Here on the far west end of the greenway next to the lakes there's an eight story luxury apartment building U/C where rent starts at $3,044 per month. It'll be a while before Columbus gets to the point that it's able to support a development like that despite all the hype about how great the housing market is there. If it's doing so great it should be performing on a whole other level, not lagging behind cities half its size.
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Old 07-01-2016, 04:15 PM
 
860 posts, read 631,209 times
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Originally Posted by Mplsite View Post
If it's doing so great it should be performing on a whole other level, not lagging behind cities half its size.
The metro area was 1.2 million people 30 years ago, now it's over 2 million people and growing. Columbus is holding its own and then some.

Myself, although I enjoy the amenities that a larger city will give you, part of me wishes we were still at 1.2 million people.
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Old 07-05-2016, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,691 posts, read 1,231,527 times
Reputation: 2058
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mplsite View Post
Healthy cities nationwide are building tall residental buildings if they haven't already. It's important that regardless of height that they function well at street level, of course, and don't just offer pedestrians a big blank wall. The problem with Columbus is that it's not building a cluster of five story buildings in lieu of every 20-30 story tower it could/should be building. Columbus won't have as many 20+ story residential buildings as my 1/2 sq mi neighborhood quite possibly for the rest of my life (mid 30s now) and they certainly aren't building enough mid-rises to compensate.

On top of that, there are neighborhoods here where tons of mid-rises have been built such as North Loop, Stadium Village, and the neighborhoods consisting of Uptown, the latter of which has a greenway with a long continous stretch of mid-rise apartments with no equivalent in Columbus, namely the Olentangy Trail which has not seen similar development. Maybe rebrand it as the Olentangy Greenway?

Here on the far west end of the greenway next to the lakes there's an eight story luxury apartment building U/C where rent starts at $3,044 per month. It'll be a while before Columbus gets to the point that it's able to support a development like that despite all the hype about how great the housing market is there. If it's doing so great it should be performing on a whole other level, not lagging behind cities half its size.
There's plenty of development happening in Columbus right now. Although strengthening our skyline would be nice there are plenty of other projects under way that are improving our city. If you don't like Columbus or think it's an underperforming city that's perfectly fine but I don't see how constantly comparing it to Minneapolis or Austin is a useful exercise. We are Columbus not Austin, Portland, or any other city and while we have much to improve in our city I would just live in any of those cities if I wanted my city to be a cheap replica of what has already been done.
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Old 07-05-2016, 08:52 PM
 
634 posts, read 391,847 times
Reputation: 692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mplsite View Post
Healthy cities nationwide are building tall residental buildings if they haven't already. It's important that regardless of height that they function well at street level, of course, and don't just offer pedestrians a big blank wall. The problem with Columbus is that it's not building a cluster of five story buildings in lieu of every 20-30 story tower it could/should be building. Columbus won't have as many 20+ story residential buildings as my 1/2 sq mi neighborhood quite possibly for the rest of my life (mid 30s now) and they certainly aren't building enough mid-rises to compensate.

On top of that, there are neighborhoods here where tons of mid-rises have been built such as North Loop, Stadium Village, and the neighborhoods consisting of Uptown, the latter of which has a greenway with a long continous stretch of mid-rise apartments with no equivalent in Columbus, namely the Olentangy Trail which has not seen similar development. Maybe rebrand it as the Olentangy Greenway?

Here on the far west end of the greenway next to the lakes there's an eight story luxury apartment building U/C where rent starts at $3,044 per month. It'll be a while before Columbus gets to the point that it's able to support a development like that despite all the hype about how great the housing market is there. If it's doing so great it should be performing on a whole other level, not lagging behind cities half its size.
From having lived in Houston and Austin and experienced the growth there firsthand the amenities have to be there to draw the residents. Once the nightlife, restaurants, entertainment and such is there the demand will be there for those kinds of housing projects. Columbus' downtown revitalization is about what Austin's was around 1990 the high-rises came about 15 years later. I can see the growth here taking off. Do you know of anyplace that has built the high-rises first?
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Old 07-07-2016, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Dublin, OH
2,359 posts, read 3,301,055 times
Reputation: 1466
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clever nickname here View Post
From having lived in Houston and Austin and experienced the growth there firsthand the amenities have to be there to draw the residents. Once the nightlife, restaurants, entertainment and such is there the demand will be there for those kinds of housing projects. Columbus' downtown revitalization is about what Austin's was around 1990 the high-rises came about 15 years later. I can see the growth here taking off. Do you know of anyplace that has built the high-rises first?
Exactly...you have to have the amenities in place to draw in demand first....
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