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Old 11-30-2014, 08:05 PM
 
101 posts, read 142,648 times
Reputation: 93

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My entire life I have been in teaching positions and customer service positions because it was what I was good at --- but the money stinks. Obviously, I need a stronger skill-set to build a better resume and to be in high demand. So I decided to become a Web Developer( aka computer programmer). I always thought Tech Support would be a better transition -- but web developing is what I enjoy the most. I like creating and building things.

In the last 6 months I have been learning how to code. I have successfully learned HTML, CSS and some JavaScript. I have built three interactive websites and one calculator application from scratch. Its decent for a newbie but I need to learn A LOT MORE.

Are coding skills in demand? High paying? How does an older newbie break into the field of web development? Contract work? Temping? I'm looking for job security in a high demand field.
What other hard skills are in high demand in 2015?
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Old 12-03-2014, 12:38 PM
 
29 posts, read 57,317 times
Reputation: 21
Maverick - How have you gone about learning your new skills? On your own at home, online? online school? ITT? "Programming for Dummies"?
I am in the same boat with you - customer service, admin, etc... but I want to do something else.
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Old 12-03-2014, 09:47 PM
 
Location: At my house in my state
637 posts, read 647,289 times
Reputation: 659
If you want job security, look into embedded systems programming. Most college graduates are coming out with a high level knowledge of programming languages. The most difficult is the low level (close to hardware) languages because schools don't go in to much depth with them.

I recommend learning some assembly language and getting the true grasp behind computers.
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Old 12-03-2014, 10:14 PM
 
3,268 posts, read 3,269,500 times
Reputation: 4563
python
php
HTML5

Many areas you can go into with strong programming skills.

Database Management
Application Development
Front End web design
Back End web design
elearning (instructional technologist)
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Old 12-04-2014, 03:21 PM
 
101 posts, read 142,648 times
Reputation: 93
JJC99.

I've learned mostly from Code Academy, Cade Avengers, W3 Schools, and general programming books.
HTML and CSS is easier to learn than JavaScript in my opinion.
I am going to learn JavaScript by signing up with Treehouse.com. They have some good instructors that can help a newbie understand it. I can use some code with JavaScript but it is challenging.
My goal is to land a job as a front end developer.

usamathman,
I heard python is a solid language to learn, as well as ruby on rails for back end development.

Scarecrow I will check into the embedded systems and assembly language.

I just want to learn skills that are in demand and needed.
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Old 01-06-2015, 12:57 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,496 times
Reputation: 19
To answer your question - yes, coding skills are in-demand and are relatively high-paying in the region.

HTML, CSS, and JavaScript are a great start. Here are some potential next-steps you could take:
1. Build an expertise in HTML, CSS, JS. This would be good for gaining employment as a web front-end developer and/or designer.
2. Pick a language/framework to learn next. From what I've personally seen, .NET technologies or Java technologies are both highly employable in the area. I'd choose one. If you choose Java, shoot me a direct msg, and I'll send you some additional resources.
3. If you at all like testing and/or breaking things, an area that is super hot in the region right now (and employers are struggling to fill spots for) is automation testing. These are coders that automate the testing of applications.... they essentially build the software that tests other software. If you go this route, you could build a knowledge in testing practices, and I'd recommend studying Ruby & Cucumber.

I could be biased, but in my experience 2 and 3 above have the most opportunity/highest pay-out right now. However, and this is likely obvious, you want to pick what you like doing the most.

There are several good places online to learn coding, both free/paid. Ones I've used and have enjoyed:
-Codecademy
-Code School
-Team Treehouse

Since your interest is in web, I know a local group (of all ages) that meets up once a month to discuss/learn things together. Shoot me a direct msg and I'll send you the info.

Last edited by derock77; 01-06-2015 at 02:19 PM..
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Old 01-06-2015, 01:30 PM
 
Location: At my house in my state
637 posts, read 647,289 times
Reputation: 659
Quote:
Originally Posted by derock77 View Post
To answer your question - yes, coding skills are in-demand and are relatively high-paying in the region.

HTML, CSS, and JavaScript are a great start. Here are some potential next-steps you could take:
1. Build an expertise in HTML, CSS, JS. This would be good for gaining employment as a web front-end developer and/or designer.
2. Pick a language/framework to learn next. From what I've personally seen, .NET technologies or Java technologies are both highly employable in the area. I'd choose one. If you choose Java, shoot me a direct msg, and I'll send you some additional resources.
3. If you at all like testing and/or breaking things, an area that is super hot in the region right now (and employers are struggling to fill spots for) is automation testing. These are coders that automate the testing of applications.... they essentially build the software that tests other software. If you go this route, you could build a knowledge in testing practices, and I'd recommend studying Ruby & Cucumber.

I could be biased, but in my experience 2 and 3 above have the most opportunity/highest pay-out right now. However, and this is likely obvious, you want to pick what you like doing the most.

There are several good places online to learn coding, both free/paid. Ones I've used and have enjoyed:
-Codecademy
-Code School
-Team Treehouse

Since you're interest is in web, I know a local group (of all ages) that meets up once a month to discuss/learn things together. Shoot me a direct msg and I'll send you the info.
What is the pay gap between automation testers and backend developers?
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Old 01-09-2015, 12:30 AM
 
38 posts, read 47,068 times
Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverick_72 View Post
JJC99.

I've learned mostly from Code Academy, Cade Avengers, W3 Schools, and general programming books.
HTML and CSS is easier to learn than JavaScript in my opinion.
I am going to learn JavaScript by signing up with Treehouse.com. They have some good instructors that can help a newbie understand it. I can use some code with JavaScript but it is challenging.
My goal is to land a job as a front end developer.

usamathman,
I heard python is a solid language to learn, as well as ruby on rails for back end development.

Scarecrow I will check into the embedded systems and assembly language.

I just want to learn skills that are in demand and needed.
HTML and CSS are not really programming languages per say, HTML (HyperText Markup Language) is mostly a document format-description language. CSS (Cascading Style Sheet) in basically an extension of HTML, adding new descriptors of style and format; thus in effect replacing old depricated HTML tags.

JavaScript is a real programming language that works within the realms of HTML. Most pop-up box and online forms are all written in Javascript. It has been around for a while, and it is a dominant factor.

Embedded Systems and Microcontrollers are a hot topic. Instead of hardwiring a new IC for a new product (ODBC car scanner, microwave, battery charger, solar panel charge controller, Xbox joypad, etc), they program a cheap off-shelf microcontroller to get the job done. Mostly, you program them with an ecosystem/platform of development based on C or C++. And while Assembly (for me) is the Holy Grail of programming, the learning curve is way too steep and often there are not rapid returns or gains given that microcontrollers nowdays are very powerful (processing power) and have plenty of memory (Eprom, rom, flash, dram) built-in.
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