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Old 03-17-2015, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Mahoning Valley, Ohio
416 posts, read 545,398 times
Reputation: 430

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZnGuy View Post
So because a certain part of the country continues to see substantial population growth it must be 'overrated' (obviously your opinion is in the minority so it doesn't matter) and another area is dying which, in your mind must be 'under rated' (why the heck would you want to live there). No wonder you favor Flint.
But wait, you're always expressing your opinion in Columbus' forum about how great your life is in Charlotte, hence my remark. I don't care what other opinions including yours are. Charlotte gets a bad reputation in the city vs. city forum, but that shouldn't move one's opinion based on all that criticism.

I don't like Flint, nor do I like Charlotte. I would take living in the North over the South. Did it for several years after college. "Why the heck would you want to live there?" Why do you care where people choose to live?
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Old 03-18-2015, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,766 posts, read 12,744,983 times
Reputation: 5440
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZnGuy View Post
So because a certain part of the country continues to see substantial population growth it must be 'overrated' (obviously your opinion is in the minority so it doesn't matter) and another area is dying which, in your mind must be 'under rated' (why the heck would you want to live there). No wonder you favor Flint.
Sun Belt cities should be worried to some degree about maintaining their rapid growth rates. The pace of construction has long-term consequences that I don't think many, if any, of these cities are really prepared for.

And growth seems to be falling, whereas it is either rising or steadying out in Northern areas. Let's compare Charlotte and Columbus metros in terms of domestic migration.

Migration from Northern States to the metro.

2006-2010
Charlotte: +18,613
Columbus: +11,112

2007-2011
Charlotte: +16,475
Columbus: +12,024

2008-2012
Columbus: +14,118
Charlotte: +13,490

Change 2006-2010 to 2008-2012
Columbus: +27.05%
Charlotte: -27.52%

Columbus actually attracted more migration from Northern states in the latest available period than Charlotte did, and the trends are in the complete opposite direction.

Migration from Southern States to the metro.

2006-2010
Charlotte: +3,971
Columbus: -4,015

2007-2011
Charlotte: +1,515
Columbus: -4,183

2008-2012
Columbus: -1,935
Charlotte: -5,408

Change 2006-2010 to 2008-2012
Columbus: +51.81%
Charlotte: -236.19%

Again, while Columbus was still losing in the latest period, it was still improving over time. Charlotte was steadily downward and went negative in the most recent available period. It was losing a lot more than Columbus.

Overall total migration from all states.
Columbus
2006-2010: +6,632
2007-2011: +7,500
2008-2012: +11,241
Total % Change: +69.50%

Charlotte
2006-2010: +25,027
2007-2011: +19,231
2008-2012: +9,286
Total % Change: -63.90%

So Columbus received more domestic migration than Charlotte in the latest period.

Source: US County Migration Patterns

2009-2013 will be out soon, so it will be interesting to see if these trends have continued.
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Old 03-18-2015, 05:22 PM
 
1,422 posts, read 1,360,910 times
Reputation: 1349
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMahValley View Post
WRONG: I'm confused with your logic. Someone asked if Detroit even had 500,000 people, and I said "combine the populations of Cleveland and Cincinnati and its around the same size as Detroit proper." And your rebuttal is?????

What part are you not understanding here? You mentioned how much larger Detroit proper was, and I am telling you Detroit has fallen so much that it is not nearly as large over Cleveland and Cincinnati as it once was. Detroit was much larger over both cities back in the day, but that population is much closer to both cities today, and the amenities are right on par with a "much larger" city. I don't care what one poster said before, I never once said Detroit does not have 500,000 people. It's getting close to that, though. That was between you and another poster on your tirade in this thread.


Yes, Detroit has fallen but it is still Cleveland and Cincinnati combined. If this issue was between another poster and me, then why did you make a remark concerning my rebuttal to this poster? Again, combine those two cities' populations, MSA's, and GDP, and you arrive at Detroit's population, MSA, and GDP. So why do you refute this?

WRONG: UC looks like a corporate parkway except now they built panera bread on Euclid. Woodward is 4 lanes with a center lane. Just like Euclid. Wayne State University is East, and several museums and hospitals are West of Woodward.

WRONG. A corporate walkway? Again, you are really grasping for something here. If you talk about UC building a Panera, then look at the cheap suburban mixed-use developments that have gone up on Woodward. UC has built Uptown and MOCA alone in the last few years, something that Midtown should try to emulate. Euclid has bike lanes, two lanes for vehicle traffic, and two dedicated bus lanes for the Healthline with landscaped medians and stops. Woodward is far less traffic-calming and more car-oriented. In my GIS and remote sensing classes at MSU we looked at true-color imagery of Detroit around Midtown. Look east or west of Woodward and you see green. Those are massive parcels of abandoned land and blight. Within walking distance at UC you have Little Italy and a couple Red Line stations, Detroit doesn't even have heavy rail.

Little Italy or you mean Tiny Italy? A light rail is being placed along Woodward in Midtown. No need to emulate UC. Hopefully it will be connect to robust pedestrian downtown cities which are across the metropolitan area such as Ferndale, Royal Oak, Berkely, Rochester, Pontiac, Birmingham, Wyandotte, Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti, Northville, and Plymouth to name a few. Sort of like your Akron. I am not a fan of the UC design. I prefer continuous buildings set on a street in a linear fashion, not a corporate circle with a pond.

WRONG: Playhouse square has 9 theaters with 10,000 seats in walking distance...ah...Detroit's Fox Theater, Masonic Temple, and Opera House are all in walking distance. Just these three venues have more seats than all of Playhouse Square. Not to mention there are other venues in walking distance: The Grand Circus Theatre; Broadway Capitol Theatre; Paramount Theatre; Capital Theatre, the Gem Theatre and Century Theatre, Music Hall Center.

WRONG. Those theaters are within walking distance, but they are not in one combined district with a theater theme with a vital streetlife scene. Let's just keep extending out and adding more theaters that aren't even part of the districts you're talking about.[i]

I was mentioning that downtown Detroit has theaters with more seating capacity than Playhouse square, and I only named 3 which are in walking distance. Not sure how all of these theater do not constitute a theater district in your mind.


In Midtown, there is Hilberry Theatre, the Detroit Institute of Arts, anchored by the 2,089-seat Fisher Theatre in New Center.

Right, my point exactly, MIDTOWN.

I was merely mentioning that there are grand theaters in Midtown as well. I wasn't combining it with the theater district downtown.

WRONG: The title of this thread is Columbus vs. Detroit, right? So, am I barred from commenting that if the OP wishes to find more amenities than what one can find in Detroit, the OP should go elsewhere than Columbus? How did this simple statement entail your analysis that I said that Detroit is the end all be all? Reread the sequence of posts. My posts are all responses to your defensive knee jerk reactions.

WRONG. Obviously it is titled Columbus vs. Detroit, that's what caught your attention. I never once said you were barred from any thread, just that you have taken it out of hand because you didn't like the responses of the posters that followed your chamber of commerce speech. You don't go out and say Detroit is the end all, but your undertones and homerism speak volumes. I responded in a matter of fact way my very first post in this thread that obviously bothered you, and it was you who took it to the next level after that post.


Reread your first post in response to my first post which stated if the OP wishes to find more amenities outside of Detroit, the OP should go elsewhere than Columbus.

I would probably enjoy the smooth roads once you enter Ohio from Michigan, a nice change of what you're used to.
I will agree with you that the roads in Ohio are in better shape, and that is always welcomed. So that's a nice change. Sort of like when you enter Michigan from Ohio, you would probably enjoy the scenery of two peninsulas, which would be a nice change of what you're used to seeing. Oh wait, I forgot, Edgewater Park and Hocking Hills....Oh, and do you need anything from the Detroit area? I don't mind bringing you something in case you don't want to order online.

Last edited by Republic of Michigan; 03-18-2015 at 05:32 PM..
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Old 03-18-2015, 08:50 PM
 
Location: livin' the good life
2,117 posts, read 3,536,934 times
Reputation: 1212
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Sun Belt cities should be worried to some degree about maintaining their rapid growth rates. The pace of construction has long-term consequences that I don't think many, if any, of these cities are really prepared for.

And growth seems to be falling, whereas it is either rising or steadying out in Northern areas. Let's compare Charlotte and Columbus metros in terms of domestic migration.

Migration from Northern States to the metro.

2006-2010
Charlotte: +18,613
Columbus: +11,112

2007-2011
Charlotte: +16,475
Columbus: +12,024

2008-2012
Columbus: +14,118
Charlotte: +13,490

Change 2006-2010 to 2008-2012
Columbus: +27.05%
Charlotte: -27.52%

Columbus actually attracted more migration from Northern states in the latest available period than Charlotte did, and the trends are in the complete opposite direction.

Migration from Southern States to the metro.

2006-2010
Charlotte: +3,971
Columbus: -4,015

2007-2011
Charlotte: +1,515
Columbus: -4,183

2008-2012
Columbus: -1,935
Charlotte: -5,408

Change 2006-2010 to 2008-2012
Columbus: +51.81%
Charlotte: -236.19%

Again, while Columbus was still losing in the latest period, it was still improving over time. Charlotte was steadily downward and went negative in the most recent available period. It was losing a lot more than Columbus.

Overall total migration from all states.
Columbus
2006-2010: +6,632
2007-2011: +7,500
2008-2012: +11,241
Total % Change: +69.50%

Charlotte
2006-2010: +25,027
2007-2011: +19,231
2008-2012: +9,286
Total % Change: -63.90%

So Columbus received more domestic migration than Charlotte in the latest period.

Source: US County Migration Patterns

2009-2013 will be out soon, so it will be interesting to see if these trends have continued.

census population 2010-2013
Columbus 788,000-822,000 +34k (4%)
CLT 735,000-792,000 +58 (7.3%) should leapfrog COL in population rankings soon

COL Metro 1.9 Mil
CLT Metro 2.3 Mil

http://charlottesights.com/2165/char...rowing-cities/

Back to OP I actually like Detroit (actually in DET at moment), mainly the northern suburbs. Columbus has some nice neighborhoods and a nice town as I lived there for a few years and grew up nearby. I am not a fan how it seems to have a become big box retail and food chain haven on steroids tho.

Last edited by ZnGuy; 03-18-2015 at 09:10 PM..
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Old 03-18-2015, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,766 posts, read 12,744,983 times
Reputation: 5440
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZnGuy View Post
census population 2010-2013
Columbus 788,000-822,000 +34k (4%)
CLT 735,000-792,000 +58 (7.3%) should leapfrog COL in population rankings soon

COL Metro 1.9 Mil
CLT Metro 2.3 Mil

Charlotte Makes Forbes’ America’s 20 Fastest Growing Cities | Charlotte Relocation

Back to OP I actually like Detroit (actually in DET at moment), mainly the northern suburbs. Columbus has some nice neighborhoods and a nice town as I lived there for a few years and grew up nearby. I am not a fan how it seems to have a become big box retail and food chain haven on steroids tho.
Enjoy it while it lasts. From what I can tell, a large chunk of that growth was through annexation, the same way Columbus grew quickly in the 1950s and 1960s. Charlotte itself is a pretty insignificant city, artificially inflated by huge city limits. In reality, it is nowhere near Columbus.
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Old 03-19-2015, 05:41 AM
 
Location: livin' the good life
2,117 posts, read 3,536,934 times
Reputation: 1212
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Enjoy it while it lasts. From what I can tell, a large chunk of that growth was through annexation, the same way Columbus grew quickly in the 1950s and 1960s. Charlotte itself is a pretty insignificant city, artificially inflated by huge city limits. In reality, it is nowhere near Columbus.
insignificant enough that the city got DEM convention and COL did not , well aware your hard on against the SE, adios
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Old 03-19-2015, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,766 posts, read 12,744,983 times
Reputation: 5440
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZnGuy View Post
insignificant enough that the city got DEM convention and COL did not , well aware your hard on against the SE, adios
Cleveland got the GOP. Does that mean Charlotte is on par with Cleveland? The convention in Charlotte was political, of course. They wanted to be in a Southern swing state, and NC has moved in that direction more recently. It doesn't mean anything as to the significance of the city.

It usually takes cities multiple attempts to get a convention. Columbus made it to the Dem's top 3 in the first try. Nothing to be ashamed about.

If Columbus and Charlotte were both 200 square miles, Columbus would have over 230,000 more people. That IS significant.
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Old 03-19-2015, 12:58 PM
 
418 posts, read 419,160 times
Reputation: 395
Columbus is a great city. It is growing and it is diverse. There always things to do. There are great educational institutions. Property values did not plummet as much as other areas. Cost of living is low in Columbus.
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Old 03-20-2015, 10:32 AM
 
Location: livin' the good life
2,117 posts, read 3,536,934 times
Reputation: 1212
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Cleveland got the GOP. Does that mean Charlotte is on par with Cleveland? The convention in Charlotte was political, of course. They wanted to be in a Southern swing state, and NC has moved in that direction more recently. It doesn't mean anything as to the significance of the city.

It usually takes cities multiple attempts to get a convention. Columbus made it to the Dem's top 3 in the first try. Nothing to be ashamed about.

If Columbus and Charlotte were both 200 square miles, Columbus would have over 230,000 more people. That IS significant.
Humorous how you twist your explanation to fit your agenda. On your population twist, the census is only stat that matters otherwise the Cin-Day argument as the most populated area in OH has strong merit.
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Old 03-20-2015, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,766 posts, read 12,744,983 times
Reputation: 5440
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZnGuy View Post
Humorous how you twist your explanation to fit your agenda. On your population twist, the census is only stat that matters otherwise the Cin-Day argument as the most populated area in OH has strong merit.
The Cin-Day thing is related to metro definitions. The two cities have, so far, not met those definitions/requirements. That has nothing to do with claiming to be a top 20 largest city because you've annexed yourself into having one of the largest city boundaries in the country. If Detroit annexed enough land, it'd be growing too, or at least higher on the ranking.
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