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Old 02-25-2015, 12:07 PM
 
4,237 posts, read 3,287,874 times
Reputation: 1837

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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamian in nc View Post
I'm in my mid-50s. I've been living in North Carolina for over 12 years and have yet to fit into the culture here and feel like I belong. "Ain't gonna happen." I came to NC from the Cleveland area where I had lived for three years plus to work on an ESL certificate (to teach adults). I've been struggling over the years here. teaching part-time eves and trying to make it during the day with temp office jobs. At the time I was in Cleveland I didn't give it enough time to get acclimated and my only reason for leaving was the weather. I'm originally from Florida but left after my parents died to go to Cleveland, where I had some acquaintances.

So now, I've been looking at two universities to attempt to do a Master's in TESOL (at my older age). I am hesitant due to my age, having to take on a loan, then wondering if I'll find a job when I'm done. One university if the University of Findlay. The other is Ohio Dominican University. If I go to Findlay, I wonder what the job opportunities would be while taking classes. If I go to Columbus, that's still a question, but perhaps being a larger city would enable more open doors while doing my coursework. I don't know if I will hack it being in school again, so I think if I have to do administrative/office work or even some type of retail (my past career was in publishing, as an editorial researcher), then Columbus or Cleveland would have more opportunities. But which?

I have never lived in Columbus but of course I know Cleveland. Now that I'm over the weather issue I truly miss Ohio. Even though I'm from Florida (Miami), I haven't lived there so many years that going to Miami is not a consideration. In Cleveland I belonged to a parish I really enjoyed. I felt a sense of community. I loved the Metroparks. I loved walking by the lake. I loved West Side Market, going downtown, being able to be exposed to the various ethnicities, including access to my own Hungarian foods.

So what to do? Any input would be appreciated!
Being in your mid-50s and with the list of things you liked about Cleveland, I would go with Cleveland. Just make it work. Cleveland's urban core is indeed in renewal and is much better suited for mature adults. Lots of things to do as you already know. Not sure when last you lived in Cleveland but areas of the city itself are exploding, no longer imploding. Downtown is turning into a spectacular center of activity, extending east into University Circle/Little Italy, south to Slavic Village/Tremont, west to Ohio City and Detroit-Shoreway and, finally, north to the amazing asset known as Lake Erie.

Not sure if there is any Hungarian activity in Columbus; you already know about Cleveland's Hungarian connection.

Look at the new Heinen's grocery store at E 9th/Euclid, likely the most amazing grocery store in the U.S.

That said, however, if you need to work while working on your TESOL, then Columbus is the place, not Findlay. Going to school in Columbus would, obviously, expose you to the city that, perhaps, you may opt to stay in after completing your courses.

Good luck with your decision but it sounds like Ohio will gain a new resident regardless.
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Old 02-25-2015, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Dublin, OH
2,359 posts, read 3,300,380 times
Reputation: 1466
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
I still don't get the housing comment you keep making. There are many housing developers currently building, some good, some not. And there is housing that goes back up to 200 years, so making blanket statements doesn't make sense. You can find plenty of good quality housing in Columbus. Do your research and you won't have an issue.

What makes the apartments in Cleveland nicer? What are you comparing, exactly? Examples?

And stucco, again, is NOT a common building material in Columbus. I lived there most of my life and can remember only a handful of houses with stucco exterior. Stucco works best in dry, warm climates, not in Ohio. The vast majority of old homes used either brick or wood exteriors, while new housing uses mostly vinyl, composites or mixed materials.
In terms of apartments, I always thought the apartments outside of downtown Cleveland look rather bland and boring...many look very dated to the 60s and 70s, even in some of the nicer areas...now, Shaker Square and many of the apt conversions downtown and in the Warehouse District or sweet.
But in the suburbs, I'll take what I have here in Columbus over Cleveland.
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Old 02-25-2015, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Dublin, OH
2,359 posts, read 3,300,380 times
Reputation: 1466
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohioad View Post
While i think Cleveland is a great city, Columbus in my opinion is a better bet for now and into the future. Columbus is a growing city with a great economy. There is just more oppurtunity in Columbus then any of the 3 C's. As for nice suburbs....the Delaware county suburbs are some of the nicest in the state of Ohio. There is a reason it has been the fastest growing county in Ohio for years. Dublin, Powell and Westerville have exploded. Also, you wont find a nicer suburb then New Albany on the Licking County side of Columbus. Downtown Columbus is going through one of the best transformations i have eve seen in a major city. The urban core is the place to be in Columbus right now. The best part is that its just the beginning of that transformation. Again, nothing against Cleveland, but a safer bet is Columbus.
While Columbus downtown is getting better and growing, it's not on the level of either Cleveland or Cincinnati.
Columbus doesn't have a downtown grocery store...Cleveland has 2 now (Whse District has a small one and Heinens is opening today).
Columbus hasn't built a new skycraper in forever, and still has far more surface lots than the other 2.

In terms of growth, Cincinatti's metro is actually the fastest growing metro of the 3 Cs.
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Old 02-25-2015, 01:16 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
444 posts, read 655,443 times
Reputation: 542
It's too bad it wouldn't be feasible to go to school in Findlay and live in either Cleveland or Columbus' I can see Findlay is about 100 miles from Columbus and over 122 from Cleveland. I have been looking at Findlay jobs on Indeed, the Courier online, and Craig's List. Yes, Lowkeykennyg, that's my concern, a lack of jobs there at Findlay, and being isolated. They do have a tutoring center on the University of Findlay campus. Without being there, I don't know if I could earn enough tutoring, along with the student loan.

When I visited Columbus years ago I didn't like the city, comparing it to Cleveland. However, if jobs are more plentiful, that's a reason to go there. Does anyone know anything about Ohio Dominican University? Muffy1, what you said really hits the nail on the head - job placements. i asked about that at Findlay and didn't get a clear answer. I was told there are lots of opportunities abroad, this said by the department. As for jobs here, they share notices of jobs they learn about with the students, I hear. I tried contacting someone on Linked In who graduated from there and teaches there in one of their programs, and the person did not reply. The ODU site addresses placements, and the professor I spoke with there actually gave me names of places graduates have gone. ODU also offers K-12 licensure if one wants to earn that along with the master's. At the moment I'm not really keen on the K-12 route, but that's basing it on my experiences in North Carolina with the school systems here. Again, the ODU professor even sent me links to places around Columbus that offer ESL instruction to the large international population.

How far is ODU from Ohio State? There seem to be more campus jobs at Ohio State than ODU. If they're close enough to each other it might be good to seek employment at Ohio State. With my experience job hunting, people never reply when they see a NC address on my application. Thus, I don't want to keep spending my efforts on sending out resumes from here and will have to wait till I get there.

If I did choose Columbus, what are the areas to stay away from to rent/live? I don't know why, but in cities it always seems it is the east parts. What are some safe and affordable zip codes to rent in?
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Old 02-25-2015, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,766 posts, read 12,744,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamms View Post
I know Columbus has been experiencing job growth but the numbers for 2014 disclosed a different story. Cincinnati led of the 3 Cs with over 20K new jobs, then Cleveland with about 13,800 then Columbus, a distant 3rd at 8,300.

What's the story with the Columbus numbers?
Considering that both other cities are still in the hole in terms of recession losses while Columbus is well recovered, and overall unemployment rates being higher than Columbus, I'm not sure the smaller growth is really a big issue. Perhaps a temporary slowdown last year, but not likely an indication of any serious long-term issues.
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Old 02-25-2015, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,766 posts, read 12,744,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioaninsc View Post
While Columbus downtown is getting better and growing, it's not on the level of either Cleveland or Cincinnati.
Columbus doesn't have a downtown grocery store...Cleveland has 2 now (Whse District has a small one and Heinens is opening today).
Columbus hasn't built a new skycraper in forever, and still has far more surface lots than the other 2.

In terms of growth, Cincinatti's metro is actually the fastest growing metro of the 3 Cs.
Columbus does have a downtown grocery, just not a huge one. There is Hills Market on Grant. Plus there is the full-size Kroger in the Brewery District, so not too far away.

Depending on the definition of "skyscraper", Columbus' last Downtown building of at least 20 stories was in 2007/2008.

Cincinnati's metro is NOT growing faster. Columbus' is growing about 2x faster.
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Old 02-25-2015, 03:09 PM
 
4,237 posts, read 3,287,874 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Columbus does have a downtown grocery, just not a huge one. There is Hills Market on Grant. Plus there is the full-size Kroger in the Brewery District, so not too far away.

Depending on the definition of "skyscraper", Columbus' last Downtown building of at least 20 stories was in 2007/2008.

Cincinnati's metro is NOT growing faster. Columbus' is growing about 2x faster.
Considering that Hocking and Perry Counties were just added to Columbus metro, of course it may be ''growing'' faster. This is all a numbers game; adding these two counties to Cbus metro will make it appear that x number of people have just moved to Columbus. Conversely, removing adjacent Akron metro and counties from Cleveland makes it appear that almost 1 million people have left that metro area in the past 10 years.
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Old 02-25-2015, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,766 posts, read 12,744,983 times
Reputation: 5440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamms View Post
Considering that Hocking and Perry Counties were just added to Columbus metro, of course it may be ''growing'' faster. This is all a numbers game; adding these two counties to Cbus metro will make it appear that x number of people have just moved to Columbus. Conversely, removing adjacent Akron metro and counties from Cleveland makes it appear that almost 1 million people have left that metro area in the past 10 years.
If that's true, it's easily provable, so let's take a look.

The counties that were part of the metro prior to the 2013 update were:

Columbus
Franklin
Delaware
*****way
Union
Madison
Licking
Fairfield
Morrow

Cincinnati
Hamilton
Warren
Butler
Franklin, IN
Boone, KY
Bracken, KY
Campbell, KY
Gallatin, KY
Grant, KY
Kenton, KY
Pendleton, KY
Brown
Clermont

2000-2013 Total Population Change Pre-2013 Boundary
Columbus Counties
Franklin: +143,285
Delaware: +74,990
*****way: +3,577
Union: +12,397
Madison: +3,064
Licking: +22,884
Fairfield: +26,108
Morrow: +3,405
Total: +289,710

Cincinnati
Hamilton: -40,783
Warren: +60,786
Butler: +38,465
Franklin: +800
Boone: +38,451
Bracken: +137
Campbell: +2,372
Gallatin: +604
Grant: +2,369
Kenton: +11,681
Pendleton: +180
Brown: +1,979
Clermont: +22,241
Total: +139,282

So nope, you'd be wrong. Columbus would still be growing a bit more than 2x faster than Cincinnati's metro even without the 2 extra counties. In fact, Franklin County grew faster all by itself than the entire Cincinnati metro.
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Old 02-25-2015, 04:39 PM
 
4,237 posts, read 3,287,874 times
Reputation: 1837
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
If that's true, it's easily provable, so let's take a look.

The counties that were part of the metro prior to the 2013 update were:

Columbus
Franklin
Delaware
*****way
Union
Madison
Licking
Fairfield
Morrow

Cincinnati
Hamilton
Warren
Butler
Franklin, IN
Boone, KY
Bracken, KY
Campbell, KY
Gallatin, KY
Grant, KY
Kenton, KY
Pendleton, KY
Brown
Clermont

2000-2013 Total Population Change Pre-2013 Boundary
Columbus Counties
Franklin: +143,285
Delaware: +74,990
*****way: +3,577
Union: +12,397
Madison: +3,064
Licking: +22,884
Fairfield: +26,108
Morrow: +3,405
Total: +289,710

Cincinnati
Hamilton: -40,783
Warren: +60,786
Butler: +38,465
Franklin: +800
Boone: +38,451
Bracken: +137
Campbell: +2,372
Gallatin: +604
Grant: +2,369
Kenton: +11,681
Pendleton: +180
Brown: +1,979
Clermont: +22,241
Total: +139,282

So nope, you'd be wrong. Columbus would still be growing a bit more than 2x faster than Cincinnati's metro even without the 2 extra counties. In fact, Franklin County grew faster all by itself than the entire Cincinnati metro.
Based on info through 2013 and it is estimated. Also, Columbus can add about an instant 66k to its metro for adding Hocking and Perry Counties.

Your use of ''if that's true'' and my use of ''may'' qualify this exchange. My point is that adding two counties adds instant growth to the Columbus metro area.

So, yep, you misunderstood my post.
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Old 02-25-2015, 09:49 PM
 
418 posts, read 419,160 times
Reputation: 395
Kamms where did you get the data from? I hope Columbus continues its job growth!!
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