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Old 04-23-2015, 06:56 PM
 
Location: MPLS
1,064 posts, read 1,031,980 times
Reputation: 659

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Because, like always, you attempted to suggest they're not really bad in comparison. What a shocker.

Your hero Liz Lessner is busy closing restaurants these days.
First you said that I said that there are no bad areas and now you're backtracking on that demonstrably false claim with "they're not really bad in comparison". I don't have to attempt anything. Most simply aren't comparable aside from a range of blocks north and south of W Broadway North and that's because that is the only area comparable to South Linden...or Driving Park, Southern Orchards, Highland West, or even Franklinton (not East), Reeb-Hosack/Steelton, Krumm Park, North Central and parts of Near East (mainly Mt Vernon and Main).

This is likely in part by the long-standing Scandinavian cultural influence: Minneapolitans are willing to pay more into their neighborhoods and city for the general good. And guess what? It works.

Let me break it down for you and anyone else that has doubts about how healthy our neighborhoods are. Minneapolis has 11 general areas of the city known as "communities" which consist of several neighborhoods. Wiki lists all those here and we'll go in the order listed:

Calhoun-Isles is in the SW part of the city and consists of nine neighborhoods all very healthy. It includes the unofficial Uptown area around Lake and Hennepin which is basically a much more gentrified Short North that has an Apple Store and a concentration of bro bars: it's a lesson that Columbus residents could learn from so as not to repeat the same mistake we did. Short North > Uptown any day: just keep it that way.

Camden is in the far North side and is far enough that its seven neighborhoods see no where near as much crime further south and are largely residential, quiet and stable.

Central has six neighborhoods including those of Downtown and all are doing swell obviously, since Downtown's population has surpassed 40,000.

Longfellow is the SE part of the city east of the LRT and all neighborhoods are solid with a recent boom of new spots on a once rather dull, though not unsafe, stretch of Lake St.

Near North has the cities two worst neighborhoods side by side, Jordan and Hawthorne, while the other 4 vary with likely higher levels the closer they are to those two with Willard Hay near the parkway (bike&pedestrian-only boulevard going north all the way through the Camden community) being the best of the bunch along with Harrison also furthest away from the actually bad neighborhood duo.

Nokomis is the far south and has 11 tidy residential neighborhoods with neighborhood joints tucked away here and there: no bad ones here.

Northeast consists of 13 neighborhoods: all good with lots of variety and not listed is Mid-City Industrial, which while not considered a neighborhood since it's all warehouses has become a destination with taprooms, coffeeshops, restaurants and a couple of distilleries with one working on opening a cocktail room. And also not blighted and unsafe.

Phillips is near south and split up into 4 sub-neighborhoods but is a rather uniform area that everyone refers to simply as "Phillips" vs East/Midtown/West Phillips or Ventura Village: mostly residential with certain intersections of Franklin and Bloomington looking to be in rough shape although most storefronts are occupied. Aside from that there's a dumpy house here and there depending on the block: it's more just a working class immigrant neighborhood and I've frequented the Aldi right in the middle on Franklin w/o issue and biked through various streets without seeing lots of burnt out homes like numerous neighborhoods in Columbus.

Powderhorn is south and sandwiched between Phillips and Nokomis: it consists of 8 neighborhoods and all are healthy overall with only an iffy pocket here or there near Lake or 38th. Both were major problem spots where they intersect with Chicago Ave and those are both vastly improved today with the Midtown Global Market where a taproom just opened on Lake near Chicago and the intersection with 38th has seen art galleries and shops open up along with a third-wave coffeeshop in lieu where empty buildings and shootings and stabbings were the main sign of life, which are thankfully no longer common incidents. Lake has become Mexican restaurant central. Now the neighborhoods are mostly dotted with popular destinations all over the side streets (Powderhorn Park, Matt's Tavern: the inventor of the Jucy Lucy, May Day Cafe, Tiny Diner, Chatterbox, Northbound, etc, and soon a new grocery co-op): I'm quite a fan of the area since I can easily take the Midtown Greenway (bike highway) and it drops me off the north end to anything in the neighborhood. It has a sizable hippie and punk population mixed with long-time middle income residents and a mix of immigrants.

Southwest is technically the far SW and consists of 9 neighborhoods all varying only in degrees of frou-frou-ness (wine bars, large homes, and what have you).

University has six and only with Cedar-Riverside you do need to pay just a bit more attention near an all too crowded dive bar where career alcoholics hang out along with college kids and others looking to get sh!tfaced. I don't get the lure of the place myself, since it's just like Lisska Bar on E 5th, except that somehow translates to wildly popular here. Esquire even thinks it's all that: Palmer's, not Lisska, but really just go to Lisska for the same experience minus the crowds and it has a better sign (old-school neon) and a huge early 1900's photo of an OSU football team from the teens or 20s, I forget.

So yeah, there you have it, a couple of neighborhoods in North along with some few patches around those and then on the south side an iffy corner here and there in Phillips while few are left in Powderhorn just south of there. What can I say? City A invests much more into all its neighborhoods while City B invests less and in fewer neighborhoods and then you're shocked and outraged that City A is somehow doing much better overall? What other outcome could you possibly expect?

Oh, and as for Liz Lessner she's already left her mark on the areas where she's closed shop: even with the Jury Room that was really the only place in that area to go to and only afterward, what a coincidence, have others followed in her footsteps. Yet again.
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Old 04-23-2015, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,785 posts, read 12,761,529 times
Reputation: 5448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mplsite View Post
First you said that I said that there are no bad areas and now you're backtracking on that demonstrably false claim with "they're not really bad in comparison". I don't have to attempt anything. Most simply aren't comparable aside from a range of blocks north and south of W Broadway North and that's because that is the only area comparable to South Linden...or Driving Park, Southern Orchards, Highland West, or even Franklinton (not East), Reeb-Hosack/Steelton, Krumm Park, North Central and parts of Near East (mainly Mt Vernon and Main).

This is likely in part by the long-standing Scandinavian cultural influence: Minneapolitans are willing to pay more into their neighborhoods and city for the general good. And guess what? It works.

Let me break it down for you and anyone else that has doubts about how healthy our neighborhoods are. Minneapolis has 11 general areas of the city known as "communities" which consist of several neighborhoods. Wiki lists all those here and we'll go in the order listed:

Calhoun-Isles is in the SW part of the city and consists of nine neighborhoods all very healthy. It includes the unofficial Uptown area around Lake and Hennepin which is basically a much more gentrified Short North that has an Apple Store and a concentration of bro bars: it's a lesson that Columbus residents could learn from so as not to repeat the same mistake we did. Short North > Uptown any day: just keep it that way.

Camden is in the far North side and is far enough that its seven neighborhoods see no where near as much crime further south and are largely residential, quiet and stable.

Central has six neighborhoods including those of Downtown and all are doing swell obviously, since Downtown's population has surpassed 40,000.

Longfellow is the SE part of the city east of the LRT and all neighborhoods are solid with a recent boom of new spots on a once rather dull, though not unsafe, stretch of Lake St.

Near North has the cities two worst neighborhoods side by side, Jordan and Hawthorne, while the other 4 vary with likely higher levels the closer they are to those two with Willard Hay near the parkway (bike&pedestrian-only boulevard going north all the way through the Camden community) being the best of the bunch along with Harrison also furthest away from the actually bad neighborhood duo.

Nokomis is the far south and has 11 tidy residential neighborhoods with neighborhood joints tucked away here and there: no bad ones here.

Northeast consists of 13 neighborhoods: all good with lots of variety and not listed is Mid-City Industrial, which while not considered a neighborhood since it's all warehouses has become a destination with taprooms, coffeeshops, restaurants and a couple of distilleries with one working on opening a cocktail room. And also not blighted and unsafe.

Phillips is near south and split up into 4 sub-neighborhoods but is a rather uniform area that everyone refers to simply as "Phillips" vs East/Midtown/West Phillips or Ventura Village: mostly residential with certain intersections of Franklin and Bloomington looking to be in rough shape although most storefronts are occupied. Aside from that there's a dumpy house here and there depending on the block: it's more just a working class immigrant neighborhood and I've frequented the Aldi right in the middle on Franklin w/o issue and biked through various streets without seeing lots of burnt out homes like numerous neighborhoods in Columbus.

Powderhorn is south and sandwiched between Phillips and Nokomis: it consists of 8 neighborhoods and all are healthy overall with only an iffy pocket here or there near Lake or 38th. Both were major problem spots where they intersect with Chicago Ave and those are both vastly improved today with the Midtown Global Market where a taproom just opened on Lake near Chicago and the intersection with 38th has seen art galleries and shops open up along with a third-wave coffeeshop in lieu where empty buildings and shootings and stabbings were the main sign of life, which are thankfully no longer common incidents. Lake has become Mexican restaurant central. Now the neighborhoods are mostly dotted with popular destinations all over the side streets (Powderhorn Park, Matt's Tavern: the inventor of the Jucy Lucy, May Day Cafe, Tiny Diner, Chatterbox, Northbound, etc, and soon a new grocery co-op): I'm quite a fan of the area since I can easily take the Midtown Greenway (bike highway) and it drops me off the north end to anything in the neighborhood. It has a sizable hippie and punk population mixed with long-time middle income residents and a mix of immigrants.

Southwest is technically the far SW and consists of 9 neighborhoods all varying only in degrees of frou-frou-ness (wine bars, large homes, and what have you).

University has six and only with Cedar-Riverside you do need to pay just a bit more attention near an all too crowded dive bar where career alcoholics hang out along with college kids and others looking to get sh!tfaced. I don't get the lure of the place myself, since it's just like Lisska Bar on E 5th, except that somehow translates to wildly popular here. Esquire even thinks it's all that: Palmer's, not Lisska, but really just go to Lisska for the same experience minus the crowds and it has a better sign (old-school neon) and a huge early 1900's photo of an OSU football team from the teens or 20s, I forget.

So yeah, there you have it, a couple of neighborhoods in North along with some few patches around those and then on the south side an iffy corner here and there in Phillips while few are left in Powderhorn just south of there. What can I say? City A invests much more into all its neighborhoods while City B invests less and in fewer neighborhoods and then you're shocked and outraged that City A is somehow doing much better overall? What other outcome could you possibly expect?

Oh, and as for Liz Lessner she's already left her mark on the areas where she's closed shop: even with the Jury Room that was really the only place in that area to go to and only afterward, what a coincidence, have others followed in her footsteps. Yet again.
It's cute how you think I'm going to read all that. More of the same stuff you could've just said in a paragraph or two.
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Old 04-24-2015, 03:01 PM
 
Location: MPLS
1,064 posts, read 1,031,980 times
Reputation: 659
You mean how Minneapolis invested in all of its neighborhoods a lot while Columbus held off and invested a little in a select few? That's why this city is so much healthier overall and why most urban Columbus neighborhoods look like garbage and I can pull up lots of streetviews to back up that fact. Hey, anyone can look at that breakdown for themselves: all those Minneapolis neighborhoods aside from a couple nowhere near looking as bad as most urban Columbus neighborhoods. Too bad though, you missed me saying that I prefer the Short North over our Uptown.
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Old 05-24-2015, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Atlanta (Finally on 4-1-17)
1,850 posts, read 2,349,604 times
Reputation: 2572
I went out to the SN last night.....it's starting to attract the Park St. crowd for sure.

Every 25 feet, some dumb kid was yelling out the window of their car. The crowds all look under 27y/o.
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Old 05-24-2015, 02:22 PM
 
Location: MPLS
1,064 posts, read 1,031,980 times
Reputation: 659
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocco Barbosa View Post
I went out to the SN last night.....it's starting to attract the Park St. crowd for sure.

Every 25 feet, some dumb kid was yelling out the window of their car. The crowds all look under 27y/o.
To be fair, you're going by OSU students driving through, not those at the bars there.
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Old 05-24-2015, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,785 posts, read 12,761,529 times
Reputation: 5448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocco Barbosa View Post
I went out to the SN last night.....it's starting to attract the Park St. crowd for sure.

Every 25 feet, some dumb kid was yelling out the window of their car. The crowds all look under 27y/o.
The average age in the city is less than 32. You're going to run into a lot of younger people, especially in popular areas.

I will say that the SN is a mature neighborhood, so it's probably a lot more white collar than it ever used to be, and that's noticeable.
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Old 05-24-2015, 11:52 PM
 
1,691 posts, read 1,593,532 times
Reputation: 1168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mplsite View Post
You mean how Minneapolis invested in all of its neighborhoods a lot while Columbus held off and invested a little in a select few? That's why this city is so much healthier overall and why most urban Columbus neighborhoods look like garbage and I can pull up lots of streetviews to back up that fact. Hey, anyone can look at that breakdown for themselves: all those Minneapolis neighborhoods aside from a couple nowhere near looking as bad as most urban Columbus neighborhoods. Too bad though, you missed me saying that I prefer the Short North over our Uptown.
If this were the Minneapolis forum, I might care. But it's not, so I don't.
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Old 06-02-2015, 10:04 PM
 
Location: NKY's Campbell Co.
1,821 posts, read 3,892,022 times
Reputation: 853
What is Park Street? Never heard of it. It must not be like Short North, because I've heard of that.

Therefore, end of discussion.

FYI: I lived in Columbus, go back regularly and am moving back shortly (albeit, Gahanna in lieu of Columbus proper).
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Old 06-03-2015, 12:33 AM
 
874 posts, read 1,030,210 times
Reputation: 695
Park Street is a street that goes from High Street to Neil Avenue near Nationwide Arena that has bars that cater more towards OSU students than the rest of its surrounding area. When I went to Ohio State, the bars along that street hired promoters to come to campus to hand out fliers about foam parties and wet t-shirt contests.
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Old 06-06-2015, 11:54 AM
 
Location: NKY's Campbell Co.
1,821 posts, read 3,892,022 times
Reputation: 853
Ah. Apparently I wasn't the type to go to foam parties and what not.
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