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Old 06-12-2015, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,831,751 times
Reputation: 5473

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
ugh nobody even said that. If it makes you feel better, Cleveland's downtown population is almost twice Columbus's, but BOTH experience a significant drop in activity after 5 pm. Anyone who says downtown COlumbus and downtown Cleveland are truly vibrant at 8 pm, without a game or something of that nature, is just being dishonest. Both are trending in the right direction though, it's just that at this point, they don't match the activity of bigger cities. It is not an insult to say this.
Sure he did. It's like Mlpsite being unable to not mention Minneapolis in every post.

My point is that the entire downtown doesn't shut down at 5pm anymore. No, it's not NYC vibrant by any means, but it has changed and it's not what it used to be. Good for Cleveland if that's true for them as well... but this isn't about Cleveland.
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Old 06-12-2015, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,831,751 times
Reputation: 5473
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
There is so much wrong with that article it's entertaining (in terms of solutions to Cleveland's situation). Cleveland spends tons of money on things that nobody wants or are completely inconsequential and they have high taxes. Hmm maybe that is a reason why people moved out? Making government regional will just force those people further out. Also, Columbus should enjoy this boom now, because I'm not overly optimistic about its future, what with being really dependent on the government for employment. Won't be pretty a couple decades down the road, especially when the higher education bubble bursts too. Columbus, and actually most state capital/educational cities, like also Boston where I live, really need to consider the probable bleak future ahead and act accordingly.
lol... wut?

You might be right if the economy was lopsided toward government, but it's a whole lot more diverse than that. In fact, I think just the opposite of you. I think Columbus' real boom is not even here yet. It's had 10%-14% growth every decade for the last 30 years. Steady, but I wouldn't call that a boom because it was only a bit above the national growth rate. Currently, it's growing at a rate faster than any previous decade in its history in terms of total people, and with increasing positive national press, I could see growth rates double what they've been. Its strong growth may or may not end at some point, but it's not going to be the next Rust Belt and it's pretty silly to suggest that. Especially when the recession put that theory to the test, where government/public jobs were some of the first to be cut in large numbers. The city was one of the earliest in the nation to recover. The bubble you're talking about would affect tons of cities, and would probably plunge the country back in recession. That wouldn't be good for anywhere.
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Old 06-12-2015, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
7,966 posts, read 6,907,580 times
Reputation: 6708
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Sure he did. It's like Mlpsite being unable to not mention Minneapolis in every post.

My point is that the entire downtown doesn't shut down at 5pm anymore. No, it's not NYC vibrant by any means, but it has changed and it's not what it used to be. Good for Cleveland if that's true for them as well... but this isn't about Cleveland.
I'm not comparing it to nyc. Even Pittsburgh and Minneapolis are much more lively.
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Old 06-12-2015, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
7,966 posts, read 6,907,580 times
Reputation: 6708
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
lol... wut?

You might be right if the economy was lopsided toward government, but it's a whole lot more diverse than that. In fact, I think just the opposite of you. I think Columbus' real boom is not even here yet. It's had 10%-14% growth every decade for the last 30 years. Steady, but I wouldn't call that a boom because it was only a bit above the national growth rate. Currently, it's growing at a rate faster than any previous decade in its history in terms of total people, and with increasing positive national press, I could see growth rates double what they've been. Its strong growth may or may not end at some point, but it's not going to be the next Rust Belt and it's pretty silly to suggest that. Especially when the recession put that theory to the test, where government/public jobs were some of the first to be cut in large numbers. The city was one of the earliest in the nation to recover. The bubble you're talking about would affect tons of cities, and would probably plunge the country back in recession. That wouldn't be good for anywhere.
Lol...... based on wut? From what I can tell, just wishful thinking.
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Old 06-12-2015, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,831,751 times
Reputation: 5473
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
Lol...... based on wut? From what I can tell, just wishful thinking.
What do you think is wishful thinking? Columbus IS growing by more people annually now than at any time in its history. The economy did recover faster than most other places after the recession, despite losing a lot of public jobs. What economic conditions do you foresee that will only affect a handful of cities extremely hard yet not affect the national economy and therefore pretty much all cities, especially worse than the 2nd worst economic downturn in the last century?
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Old 06-12-2015, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,831,751 times
Reputation: 5473
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
I'm not comparing it to nyc. Even Pittsburgh and Minneapolis are much more lively.
They're still much larger places. Add another 200K-500K people to the Columbus area and then compare, because that most certainly does affect Downtown activity because there will be more business, more retail, more residents, etc.
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Old 06-12-2015, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
7,966 posts, read 6,907,580 times
Reputation: 6708
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
What do you think is wishful thinking? Columbus IS growing by more people annually now than at any time in its history. The economy did recover faster than most other places after the recession, despite losing a lot of public jobs. What economic conditions do you foresee that will only affect a handful of cities extremely hard yet not affect the national economy and therefore pretty much all cities, especially worse than the 2nd worst economic downturn in the last century?
We have fundamentally different economic understandings. What you see as "recovery", I see as "artificial delay". Not saying Columbus or any other city is doomed, I just don't buy into the gung ho everything is awesome just yet, especially cities like Columbus and many others that are so dependent on revenue from other parts of the state and government employment. Off topic for this thread though, so I will leave it at that.

But no, downtown Columbus is still not any more dangerous than other downtowns, in my opinion.
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Old 06-12-2015, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,800 posts, read 12,831,751 times
Reputation: 5473
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
We have fundamentally different economic understandings. What you see as "recovery", I see as "artificial delay". Not saying Columbus or any other city is doomed, I just don't buy into the gung ho everything is awesome just yet, especially cities like Columbus and many others that are so dependent on revenue from other parts of the state and government employment. Off topic for this thread though, so I will leave it at that.

But no, downtown Columbus is still not any more dangerous than other downtowns, in my opinion.
So we're going off your gut, huh? Compelling stuff. Honestly, Columbus may or may not boom long into the future, but if the so-called bubbles do burst, it'll be pretty much everywhere, not just a few cities. Columbus has been pretty steady for over 200 years... and as the state capital. It's gone through really awful national economic times just like Cleveland, Cincinnati or anywhere else. It has come through. I don't really see anything right now that would suggest an imminent collapse and you haven't offered anything to support your supposition. Until you do, I'll stick with established history and performance.
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Old 06-12-2015, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
7,966 posts, read 6,907,580 times
Reputation: 6708
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
So we're going off your gut, huh? Compelling stuff. Honestly, Columbus may or may not boom long into the future, but if the so-called bubbles do burst, it'll be pretty much everywhere, not just a few cities. Columbus has been pretty steady for over 200 years... and as the state capital. It's gone through really awful national economic times just like Cleveland, Cincinnati or anywhere else. It has come through. I don't really see anything right now that would suggest an imminent collapse and you haven't offered anything to support your supposition. Until you do, I'll stick with established history and performance.
I don't know what you want me to offer.My position is incredibly mild: I don't think Columbus is as greatly set up for the future because of its dependence on money that it doesn't generate and it's reliance on government employment. The region just doesn't produce anything in comparison to other metros. When state governments run out of money have to make more cuts and lay off workers with no real transferrable skills, and when other people in the state get tired of seeing their money sent to Columbus and leave, things aren't going to be as good. WHen the higher education bubble bursts, that won't be good either. I didn't say other cities wouldn't suffer too. In fact I explicitly said other cities, like where I live now, will suffer. I also didn't say "imminent", your word, not mine. Read. Could be 2 or 3 decades away, but that's how I see things unfolding. It's a prediction. This is how I see it. YOu can disagree. But please, cut the juvenile nonsense. It's tiring. Your defensiveness is quite unbecoming. I didn't say anything offensive. Relax bro.
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Old 06-12-2015, 10:36 PM
 
96 posts, read 94,741 times
Reputation: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
I'm not comparing it to nyc. Even Pittsburgh and Minneapolis are much more lively.
Pittsburgh downtown is lively?
Minneapolis downtown is indeed more happening than Columbus but then we should throw in Short North to make a fair comparison.
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