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Old 04-08-2019, 06:04 PM
 
Location: IN
21,720 posts, read 38,114,376 times
Reputation: 14290

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Yeah, but then you'd have to live in Arizona. Why would any rational person want to do that? I mean, I can sort of understand if you're a blue hair retiree who wants to live in some gated retirement community and can't afford the wasteland of Florida, but other than that, Phoenix may be one of the ugliest cities outside of Houston. At least recommend a nice town. And I'm not sure how months on end of 100+ degree heat (with or without humidity) is supposed to be attractive for anyone, or somehow an upgrade from Ohio's weather. At best, you're just trading one extreme for another, and I wouldn't even call winter in Ohio extreme. If people are so fragile that they can't handle clouds, then maybe Ohio isn't for them. But then neither is 90% of the rest of the country.


Also, I'm not sure how you can describe everything in Columbus as old. It's built environment is easily one of the newest in the Midwest and is more akin to Austin or Charlotte in age. It's almost like you're talking about somewhere else.
I handle clouds fine, but I would much prefer more snowfall, drier air, and a bit more in the way of sunlight during the winter months. The Northwoods has a far more enjoyable winter climate with consistent snow cover compared to Columbus. Columbus south to the Ohio River has what I call a "consistently sloppy" winter climate, not mild, but not very cold either.
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Old 04-08-2019, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Heidelberg, Germany
305 posts, read 541,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Yeah, but then you'd have to live in Arizona. Why would any rational person want to do that? ... At least recommend a nice town. And I'm not sure how months on end of 100+ degree heat (with or without humidity) is supposed to be attractive for anyone, or somehow an upgrade from Ohio's weather. At best, you're just trading one extreme for another, and I wouldn't even call winter in Ohio extreme. If people are so fragile that they can't handle clouds, then maybe Ohio isn't for them. But then neither is 90% of the rest of the country.


Also, I'm not sure how you can describe everything in Columbus as old. It's built environment is easily one of the newest in the Midwest and is more akin to Austin or Charlotte in age. It's almost like you're talking about somewhere else.
When was the last time you visited Phoenix? Downton has changed a lot, for the better, and some of the historic neighborhoods are pretty gorgeous now. I admit there are also miles and miles of boring streets and neighborhoods.

How about northern AZ then? Flagstaff?. More moderate weather and more four seasons.

What I mean by Columbus being old and grey is just the vibe I get from driving the streets highways across town. In the PHX metro area the public landscaping is often beautiful, including the sides of the interstate highways, clover leafs, overpasses, bridges etc.

I like the use of various shades of adobe/earth colors from yellow to brown and red in buildings, including commercial real estate. The newer neighborhoods look great and so do the history ones. Some of the Ranch style neighborhoods in places like scottsdale are also quite unique. Old town Scottsdale is quite pretty. Tempe is fun for college students, the lakes and mountains around the valley are great for outdoor activities. The blue sky, sunsets etc. Plenty to like.

Mexico City has a near perfect climate by the way. Shame it's sooo big.
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Old 04-08-2019, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
2,172 posts, read 1,552,012 times
Reputation: 1974
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post


Also, I'm not sure how you can describe everything in Columbus as old. It's built environment is easily one of the newest in the Midwest and is more akin to Austin or Charlotte in age. It's almost like you're talking about somewhere else.
Apart from the the obvious facts about Phoenix that Columbus can't touch-all 4 major sports, major hub airport, rapidly expanding Metro rail, etc., have to call out the fake news about Columbus being "new."

Columbus was already well over 100,000 residents by 1900, and had its most iconic structure in place by the 1920's.

To compare this to Charlotte or Austin is just straight up misinformation.

I understand why people want to believe that Columbus is "new", facts don't support it though.
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Old 04-09-2019, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
15,240 posts, read 14,867,999 times
Reputation: 6794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Losfrisco View Post
Apart from the the obvious facts about Phoenix that Columbus can't touch-all 4 major sports, major hub airport, rapidly expanding Metro rail, etc., have to call out the fake news about Columbus being "new."

Columbus was already well over 100,000 residents by 1900, and had its most iconic structure in place by the 1920's.

To compare this to Charlotte or Austin is just straight up misinformation.

I understand why people want to believe that Columbus is "new", facts don't support it though.

Census data disagrees with your assessment in terms of average building age. Only about 12% of Columbus' residential buildings, for example, were built prior to WWII. This is significantly closer to the likes of Sun Belt cities than it is to other major Midwestern cities. Columbus has historic neighborhoods, of course, but a lot of its built environment is newer than most.

None of those things change the fact that Phoenix is pretty ugly, IMO. I am not a fan of desert topography, the endless dead hills of sand and scrub brush. It's similar to why I dislike South California topography. I prefer actual green landscapes. Phoenix also has all that tract housing that all looks the same on every street and is all in various shades of beige. I like more architectural variety. I am also not a promoter of extreme heat, which will only get worse as the climate becomes hotter. No thanks. Phoenix is one of those cities that probably shouldn't exist at all given its location.
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Old 04-25-2019, 05:07 PM
 
Location: moved
9,927 posts, read 6,061,898 times
Reputation: 16821
The OP has a young/growing family. Her husband has local roots, and a blue-collar vocation. She doesn’t find strong consonance with Southern California life, and finds Ohio to be pleasant and aesthetically appealing. Thus, there’s excellent impetus to move to Ohio.

Some of us have quite the opposite situation. We’re unmarried and have no children. We have no cultural roots or relations in Ohio. We have “coastal” mentality, and possible esoteric professions. And yes, we hate harsh winters. Thus, there’s impetus to leave Ohio and to move to Southern California. Speaking personally, I hope to achieve this in due time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wrightflyer View Post
Columbus and Ohio overall is very different from SoCal.
Columbus itself isn’t shockingly different from parts of Southern California, except of course for the weather, topography and proximity of salt-water. It is a reasonably prosperous city. 50 miles south, east or west of Columbus is a different story entirely. When we speak of Ohio being backward, retrograde and mired in decline, we don’t really mean Cleveland-Columbus-Cincinnati. We mean the steel-mill towns, the coal-mining towns, the farm market-towns, the hollowed-out one-company towns. We mean the parts of Ohio that resemble traditional tropes about West Virginia, or Oklahoma. We mean places where property-values peaked 20 years ago, and where there are more residents who dropped out of high-school, than who have graduated from college. That's not Columbus.

To me, Columbus feels somewhat akin to Denver, minus of course the mountains.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mbear30 View Post
...As someone that was born and raised in Socal, that has always lived 10 minutes from the beach its overrated.
It's easy to become jaded with the familiar. I'm an aeronautical engineer, who lives not far from the US Air Force Museum in Dayton. I love airplanes, but I've not bothered to go to that museum for years... having grown jaded. If I were to move to LA, I'd be at the beach every weekend... for a couple of years. Thereafter, I would just become background noise.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
I love the cold. I love winter. I love all 4 seasons. People make winter miserable because they're boring people who don't know what to do with themselves. ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weaubleau View Post
You will need to get used to not just cold weather in the winter, but uncomfortably hot weather in the summer, as well as many many many many cloudy days where you don't see the sun at all. ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by I_am_Father_McKenzie View Post
Who defines "comfortable"? I'm uncomfortable maybe 5 days per year. ...
I've grown to detest the combination of cold, humidity and blustery winds. Sure, these things are entirely subjective, but this business of "four seasons" really baffles me. I find the extremes of weather throughout America's midsection, from Alabama to Utah, to be uncomfortable and annoying.

My house is drafty and poorly heated. Raising winter interior temperatures above 50 deg F is a luxury. I enjoy open, rear-wheel-drive sports cars… hard to do for 6 months in Ohio. Being in the countryside, I depend on propane for heating. The monthly heating-cost, had I maintained “normal” interior temperatures, would exceed the monthly mortgage, were I to have had one. Contrast that to living in Los Angeles. I spent several years there, back in the 1990s. Not even once did I turn on the heating-system.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
There are an awful lot of people who make the weather into the sole determining factor of their personal happiness and the quality of life in an individual city. Not jobs, cost of living, crime rate, diversity, amenities, schools, health care, or any other things that actually matter day to day. ...
This depends entirely on lifestyle and life stage. If you're single, child-free, retired, relatively affluent, in good health and an aficionado of outdoor warm-weather hobbies (such as autocross, and flying radio-controlled airplanes), then crime, jobs, schools, health care, cost of living and so forth don't matter particularly much. What does matter is lots of dry, warm days.
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Old 04-26-2019, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
15,240 posts, read 14,867,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
This depends entirely on lifestyle and life stage. If you're single, child-free, retired, relatively affluent, in good health and an aficionado of outdoor warm-weather hobbies (such as autocross, and flying radio-controlled airplanes), then crime, jobs, schools, health care, cost of living and so forth don't matter particularly much. What does matter is lots of dry, warm days.

Great, so like 0.01% of the population. Meanwhile, back down here on planet Earth, most of us have to work for a living.
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Old 04-28-2019, 06:47 AM
 
1,897 posts, read 2,324,773 times
Reputation: 1018
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Great, so like 0.01% of the population. Meanwhile, back down here on planet Earth, most of us have to work for a living.
Wow I haven't posted in over a year and we still have posters living in totally different countries posting "fake news" from Mexico City. Your hatred for Florida is something only petty miserable people have because Ohioans move there in large numbers. Also if Columbus is doing so well why are you always throwing rocks and hiding your hands at other more desirable locations in the country.
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Old 04-28-2019, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
15,240 posts, read 14,867,999 times
Reputation: 6794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fl1150 View Post
Wow I haven't posted in over a year and we still have posters living in totally different countries posting "fake news" from Mexico City. Your hatred for Florida is something only petty miserable people have because Ohioans move there in large numbers. Also if Columbus is doing so well why are you always throwing rocks and hiding your hands at other more desirable locations in the country.
Florida is great if you like old people, strip malls, traffic, bugs, humidity, Jersey Shore transplants and meth. Seen it first hand. Aside from some of the nice natural areas that are being rapidly gobbled up by ant-infested ranch homes in various shades of gaudy pink, there's little redeeming about Florida.
Not to mention that climate change is going to render most of Florida's coastline uninhabitable eventually, anyway, either through sea-level rise or the American public just getting tired of footing the bill to rebuild your homes after another historic hurricane. There is no future there. It doesn't take a miserable person to see any of this. That Ohioans and others move there... well, there's no accounting for taste. We could spend all day discussing the dumba**ery of human beings and the inexplicable things they do.
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Old 04-28-2019, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
2,172 posts, read 1,552,012 times
Reputation: 1974
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Phoenix is one of those cities that probably shouldn't exist at all given its location.
But somehow they are able to exist on the Amtrak grid while Columbus isn't.
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Old 04-28-2019, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
15,240 posts, read 14,867,999 times
Reputation: 6794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Losfrisco View Post
But somehow they are able to exist on the Amtrak grid while Columbus isn't.
Good for them? Have you ever actually ridden Amtrak? I have. It’s slow af. Besides, your point is dumb. Columbus has no control over Amtrak service, and even if it did, it’s not even a great choice in terms of rail.
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