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Old 04-29-2019, 10:33 AM
 
Location: cleveland
2,301 posts, read 3,774,887 times
Reputation: 1518

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Florida is great if you like old people, strip malls, traffic, bugs, humidity, Jersey Shore transplants and meth. Seen it first hand. Aside from some of the nice natural areas that are being rapidly gobbled up by ant-infested ranch homes in various shades of gaudy pink, there's little redeeming about Florida.
Not to mention that climate change is going to render most of Florida's coastline uninhabitable eventually, anyway, either through sea-level rise or the American public just getting tired of footing the bill to rebuild your homes after another historic hurricane. There is no future there. It doesn't take a miserable person to see any of this. That Ohioans and others move there... well, there's no accounting for taste. We could spend all day discussing the dumba**ery of human beings and the inexplicable things they do.
Stop the global warming climate change bull**** hoax. This article is from 1989. It says we have 10 years to save the earth. The coasts in countries will be underwater by the year 2000 the article predicts. Now, 19 years after the coasts were supposed to be gone we have a new whack job congresswoman from New York who says The world will end in 12 years. BTW- In the 70s we were taught there was a coming Ice Age go figure.
Alex, I will take Florida over Columbus for $1000...
https://www.apnews.com/bd45c372caf118ec99964ea547880cd0
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Old 04-29-2019, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
15,240 posts, read 14,867,999 times
Reputation: 6794
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1watertiger View Post
Stop the global warming climate change bull**** hoax. This article is from 1989. It says we have 10 years to save the earth. The coasts in countries will be underwater by the year 2000 the article predicts. Now, 19 years after the coasts were supposed to be gone we have a new whack job congresswoman from New York who says The world will end in 12 years. BTW- In the 70s we were taught there was a coming Ice Age go figure.
Alex, I will take Florida over Columbus for $1000...
https://www.apnews.com/bd45c372caf118ec99964ea547880cd0
Yeah, I'm going to go ahead and accept the overwhelming scientific consensus by people who actually study this issue rather than some random guy on the internet. But thanks, anyway.

Even your article doesn't say what you claim it does. The person didn't claim it would all happen by 2000, only that things would go beyond our control by then.
The prediction was based on emission rates at the time, which were higher then and have since been reduced somewhat, particularly in the US, which was by far the #1 emitter into the early 21st century. Those reductions may have delayed the outcome, but there is a general consensus that there is a tipping point where, once gone past, the affects will accelerate beyond our control. Any emissions changes could make that happen sooner or later, or potentially not at all if we ever got serious about the issue. Realistically, though, we won't because humans are stupid and deny what's right in front of them. You're really no different than flat earthers or those that claim vaccinations cause autism. You don't understand the science, so you create your own reality instead, most likely because some idiot politician told you. It is to your doom.

And no, even during the 1970s, the consensus was a warming world. If you were taught otherwise in school, you went to a crappy school. This stuff was known all the way back to the early 20th Century. I read an article in the Dispatch about it all the way back in the 1910s. Do not confuse a Time Magazine cover with scientific consense.

So move to Florida. Enjoy the next Cat 5 over your house.
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Old 04-29-2019, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
2,172 posts, read 1,552,012 times
Reputation: 1974
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Have you ever actually ridden Amtrak? I have. It’s slow af.
Hundreds of times, and I have thousands of Amtrak reward points. There are 12 daily departures from San Diego to Los Angeles, and they are often sold out.

I've clocked the surfliner at 95mph going through Orange County. You can take the surfliner from San Diego to downtown Los Angeles in 2:32, which would be as fast or faster than driving in many cases.

I'm sure inside the bubble of Columbus, Ohio "Oh those slow trains nobody rides, lol" is a popular refrain, but outside millions of people use them in the United States for intercity travel that is, in many cases, more efficient than driving.

There's no reason why the upper midwest couldn't have similar levels of service given the population of the area, but when you have holdout cities like Columbus not even having stations, you begin to see why they don't.
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Old 04-30-2019, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
9,637 posts, read 8,860,972 times
Reputation: 8624
Quote:
Originally Posted by Losfrisco View Post
Hundreds of times, and I have thousands of Amtrak reward points. There are 12 daily departures from San Diego to Los Angeles, and they are often sold out.

I've clocked the surfliner at 95mph going through Orange County. You can take the surfliner from San Diego to downtown Los Angeles in 2:32, which would be as fast or faster than driving in many cases.

I'm sure inside the bubble of Columbus, Ohio "Oh those slow trains nobody rides, lol" is a popular refrain, but outside millions of people use them in the United States for intercity travel that is, in many cases, more efficient than driving.

There's no reason why the upper midwest couldn't have similar levels of service given the population of the area, but when you have holdout cities like Columbus not even having stations, you begin to see why they don't.
Amtrak down the BOS-WASH corridor is pretty convenient and very popular. Preferable to buses and flights, no doubt.
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Old 04-30-2019, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
15,240 posts, read 14,867,999 times
Reputation: 6794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Losfrisco View Post
Hundreds of times, and I have thousands of Amtrak reward points. There are 12 daily departures from San Diego to Los Angeles, and they are often sold out.

I've clocked the surfliner at 95mph going through Orange County. You can take the surfliner from San Diego to downtown Los Angeles in 2:32, which would be as fast or faster than driving in many cases.

I'm sure inside the bubble of Columbus, Ohio "Oh those slow trains nobody rides, lol" is a popular refrain, but outside millions of people use them in the United States for intercity travel that is, in many cases, more efficient than driving.

There's no reason why the upper midwest couldn't have similar levels of service given the population of the area, but when you have holdout cities like Columbus not even having stations, you begin to see why they don't.
The only financially successful Amtrak lines are in the Northeast, from what I've read, and other systems can have huge constructions costs. California couldn't even build a HSR system without massive cost overruns to the point that your governor cancelled most of the project except for a section in the central valley. Not that I think rail needs to be financially successful because I consider it infrastructure, but if Columbus ever gets rail, Amtrak is at the bottom of the list of desired systems. There's so much better and faster technology now, so I'd rather not see bare minimum happen. Even if Columbus wanted Amtrak back, it does not control it or any other potential national systems.
So far, it has contributed financial support to proposals like the Chicago line, and backed the Hyperloop proposal (which is unlikely anytime soon), but there's a limit to what it can do on its own when connecting to any national rail system. They also supported the 3-C proposal back in the day, but it was cancelled by the then governor. So I don't think it's honest to say they've been a holdout.
Local rail is another complex story. Plans are in the works for its first rail line. I can't say more about it, other than we'll likely get an announcement later this year.
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Old 04-30-2019, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
2,172 posts, read 1,552,012 times
Reputation: 1974
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
The only financially successful Amtrak lines are in the Northeast, from what I've read, and other systems can have huge constructions costs. California couldn't even build a HSR system without massive cost overruns to the point that your governor cancelled most of the project except for a section in the central valley. Not that I think rail needs to be financially successful because I consider it infrastructure, but if Columbus ever gets rail, Amtrak is at the bottom of the list of desired systems. There's so much better and faster technology now, so I'd rather not see bare minimum happen. Even if Columbus wanted Amtrak back, it does not control it or any other potential national systems.
So far, it has contributed financial support to proposals like the Chicago line, and backed the Hyperloop proposal (which is unlikely anytime soon), but there's a limit to what it can do on its own when connecting to any national rail system. They also supported the 3-C proposal back in the day, but it was cancelled by the then governor. So I don't think it's honest to say they've been a holdout.
Local rail is another complex story. Plans are in the works for its first rail line. I can't say more about it, other than we'll likely get an announcement later this year.
This is pretty much the standard Columbus mass transit PR.

No system will ever be perfect, and since Columbus has smartly not installed any system, the places that bought into them are suckers right?

Then, one day soon, the perfect system WILL come along, and Columbus will be perfectly positioned to pounce on it!


The bottom line is that Amtrak is the only national intercity rail there is for the forseeable future. Somehow Phoenix, Louisville, Indianapolis, etc. found a need for a station while Columbus didn't. Interesting, given their supposed amazing central location to whatever % of the U.S. population.

As far as local rail, it will never happen. Mark it down, and it won't be because of conservative politicians but the people.

Even today's "high density corridor" announcement is just yet another report/study. I doubt it will even lead to a single BRT line.

MSA's that already have rail always face significant resistance when they want to expand it. You had people promoting bogus health impact studies to try and discourage the subway expansion in Los Angeles a few years ago. Had the city not been serious and dedicated, they might have caved to stuff like that.

Cincinnati is more likely to build three more streetcar lines than C-Bus is to get a single track laid down.

Anyhow, to keep this on thread-there's a reason for SoCal right there-robust Amtrak, commuter, and metro rail service everywhere.
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Old 05-01-2019, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
15,240 posts, read 14,867,999 times
Reputation: 6794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Losfrisco View Post
This is pretty much the standard Columbus mass transit PR.

No system will ever be perfect, and since Columbus has smartly not installed any system, the places that bought into them are suckers right?

Then, one day soon, the perfect system WILL come along, and Columbus will be perfectly positioned to pounce on it!


The bottom line is that Amtrak is the only national intercity rail there is for the forseeable future. Somehow Phoenix, Louisville, Indianapolis, etc. found a need for a station while Columbus didn't. Interesting, given their supposed amazing central location to whatever % of the U.S. population.

As far as local rail, it will never happen. Mark it down, and it won't be because of conservative politicians but the people.

Even today's "high density corridor" announcement is just yet another report/study. I doubt it will even lead to a single BRT line.

MSA's that already have rail always face significant resistance when they want to expand it. You had people promoting bogus health impact studies to try and discourage the subway expansion in Los Angeles a few years ago. Had the city not been serious and dedicated, they might have caved to stuff like that.

Cincinnati is more likely to build three more streetcar lines than C-Bus is to get a single track laid down.

Anyhow, to keep this on thread-there's a reason for SoCal right there-robust Amtrak, commuter, and metro rail service everywhere.
You have some reading comprehension issues. I never said anything about Columbus waiting for the perfect system, only that it shouldn't settle for a system that is far slower than international counterparts. While Amtrak is the only national rail system, that doesn't mean Columbus can't be on a line that isn't Amtrak. As you well know, any new line- such as the proposed Chicago-Columbus line- can certainly connect to Amtrak without actually being Amtrak. None of those cities you mentioned have highly-traveled lines. In Arizona, Amtrak served only 104,000 in 2018, far less than any single airport, and ridership is flat. In Indiana, it was about 131,000 in 2018, and ridership has been falling. In Kentucky, Amtrak served only, 8,500 people in 2018, and ridership there is also going down. In Ohio, it was 134,1000 in 2018, and also going down. https://www.railpassengers.org/all-a...ip-statistics/ The Columbus airport alone has seen millions of passengers just this year so far. The problem is that Amtrak simply isn't competitive with current air travel. HSR would be far more competitive, but the US doesn't want to really invest in it. Rail has become political, and as I said before, even in California, you guys couldn't finish the LA-SF HSR due to enormous costs (what was it, $77 billion?) that became a political football. Republican leadership in Ohio is actively hostile to mass transit, so Ohio is unlikely to fair any better when it comes to building any new rail lines.

None of this is necessarily an excuse for why Columbus doesn't have rail. There's no argument that they haven't done enough, especially with local rail. At the same time, I don't think Amtrak is the answer in terms of national rail unless it's significantly upgraded. The current system outside of the NE Corridor, is mediocre at best. Meanwhile, Columbus has not always been in control. The 3-C project was out of their hands, and the only other proposals to come alone, they've supported financially, but multi-state projects are also not controlled by a single city. Whether the other proposals ever happen remains to be seen, but if they don't, it won't be because Columbus didn't want them. The history of rail in Columbus is far more complex than you're making it out to be.

Cincinnati is unlikely to ever get another line, at least with current city leadership. The public had to vote for it like 3 times and the Ohio government tried to defund it. It's going to be an uphill battle for any Ohio city to expand their systems or build new ones.

Ultimately, though, this debate isn't even about rail. You have some kind of axe to grind against Columbus and always have. If it wasn't this, it'd just be something else.
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Old 05-01-2019, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
2,172 posts, read 1,552,012 times
Reputation: 1974
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post

Ultimately, though, this debate isn't even about rail. You have some kind of axe to grind against Columbus and always have. If it wasn't this, it'd just be something else.
Yeah ok whatever.

We got here via your critique of Phoenix and Arizona-yes, I agree, a city probably shouldn't be there!

It is though, and somehow in the middle of scorching desert with artificially engineered resources they have a booming metro rail system that is set for a massive expansion.

Columbus sits in some of the most ideal conditions available and has nothing. Please tell us more about how "complicated" it is compared to Phoenix!
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Old 05-02-2019, 02:44 PM
 
8 posts, read 4,209 times
Reputation: 14
Hi! Seems like not everyone is being too helpful on this page. I believe you're asking for suburbs/neighborhoods to checkout in Columbus area rather than someone telling you you should/shouldn't move! Columbus is a great place to raise a family. I would recommend checking out the Hilliard, Dublin, and Powell areas. We live near these areas, and my sister lives in between Dublin and Hilliard. Feel free to send me a message and we can connect. I'd be happy to share my opinions and information on various areas!
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Old 05-03-2019, 05:53 PM
 
Location: NKY's Campbell Co.
1,957 posts, read 4,276,748 times
Reputation: 1047
Quote:
Originally Posted by Losfrisco View Post
The bottom line is that Amtrak is the only national intercity rail there is for the forseeable future. Somehow Phoenix, Louisville, Indianapolis, etc. found a need for a station while Columbus didn't. Interesting, given their supposed amazing central location to whatever % of the U.S. population.

I feel like you don't have a clue of the history of the railroads and how they came and essentially fell apart by the 70's, in large part due to expanded jet travel. I don't think Columbus current day can really be blamed for Amtrak's poor management and shuttering of lines.

As far as local rail, it will never happen. Mark it down, and it won't be because of conservative politicians but the people.

This is a misnomer. Columbus is very much a blue county. One of the few that went blue in Ohio back in 2016. It's the suburbs, particularly the Delaware, Licking, Fairfield and Union County suburbs, that oppose things like this as conservative infrastructure talking points.

Even today's "high density corridor" announcement is just yet another report/study. I doubt it will even lead to a single BRT line.

No one knows the future.

MSA's that already have rail always face significant resistance when they want to expand it. You had people promoting bogus health impact studies to try and discourage the subway expansion in Los Angeles a few years ago. Had the city not been serious and dedicated, they might have caved to stuff like that.

Apples to Oranges.

Cincinnati is more likely to build three more streetcar lines than C-Bus is to get a single track laid down.

You obviously have no understanding of Cincinnati politicians or politics. Don't go to the Cincinnati forum because you'd be laughed off CD. So, I'd stick to commenting on San Diego happenings in the local political scene.

Anyhow, to keep this on thread-there's a reason for SoCal right there-robust Amtrak, commuter, and metro rail service everywhere.

Amtrak is best on the coast and only certain sections. Most people in LA don't take metro or subway. Otherwise, why is the 405, 5, 91, 10, 210 and any other highway packed with cars at rush hour (and sometimes beyond) every time I go to Southern California? It just doesn't add up.
See bold comments.

Also, there is probably a reason LA consistently has seen population declines over the last 10 years. So, there is something for that argument as well. And Columbus is a metro that is gaining. Maybe not at Austin or Orlando levels, but it is gaining per census numbers. The only way LA can do this is to build like crazy and build up. Most home owners don't like this (see SF and the Bay Area). So, doubtful the housing crisis will be easily solved like the LA subway.

Side note on FL:
Personally, I love visiting family in SWFL, but would never want to live there or anywhere south of Atlanta. Too hot from April-October. And the greenery really only stays out year round south of the FL-GA line. And having seen what Maria did to PR, I wouldn't want to risk that kind of pain and drastically high insurance rates under that risk. Not that we don't have tornadoes here, but my insurance won't drop anytime a storm comes within insurance companies' risk calculations. Let alone when people evacuate (see Irene and the debacle of getting out of Miami / Ft. Lauderdale only to see the track change to the Gulf Coast) the highways become gas guzzling parking lots and stations either run out or spike their prices.

Phoenix being on a Amtrak rail line isn't much. I wonder what time the service stops and leaves? If it is like Cincinnati, that would be the time frame of 2:00 AM to 3:00 AM. I know one co-worker (of the 200 of us that travel weekly) that uses rail. And that is between Detroit and Chicago. Everyone else drives or takes a plane.
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