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Old 05-03-2019, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
2,179 posts, read 1,555,989 times
Reputation: 1979

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrightflyer View Post
See bold comments.

Also, there is probably a reason LA consistently has seen population declines over the last 10 years. So, there is something for that argument as well. And Columbus is a metro that is gaining. Maybe not at Austin or Orlando levels, but it is gaining per census numbers. The only way LA can do this is to build like crazy and build up. Most home owners don't like this (see SF and the Bay Area). So, doubtful the housing crisis will be easily solved like the LA subway.
So you went to one of the most populated parts of the world, got on a major freeway....and there were other cars on the road? Wow.


So I guess the freeways in NY and DC metro are just empty because "everyone" is on the subway.

Los Angeles is building like crazy (five buildings over 500 feet already completed just this year including the tallest residential building in California) and it won't matter what "home owners" say because unlike Columbus, suburbanites don't dictate whether the city has things like skyscrapers or subways.
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Old 05-04-2019, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
15,415 posts, read 14,903,319 times
Reputation: 6882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Losfrisco View Post
Yeah ok whatever.

We got here via your critique of Phoenix and Arizona-yes, I agree, a city probably shouldn't be there!

It is though, and somehow in the middle of scorching desert with artificially engineered resources they have a booming metro rail system that is set for a massive expansion.

Columbus sits in some of the most ideal conditions available and has nothing. Please tell us more about how "complicated" it is compared to Phoenix!
You know it's true. Why you would spend so much time trashing Columbus without any specific axe to grind wouldn't make any sense. Aside from you and the guy from Minneapolis, the only people who talk about Columbus this much are natives and people from Cleveland who don't like that it's a rising city in the state relative to Cleveland. I don't live there now, but I am a native and lived there most of my life. I care about what happens there. So what's your excuse?

I don't know Phoenix's history with rail or why it's been easier there. You must or you wouldn't be saying as much. You also must know the history of rail in Columbus, right? You being the expert on the issue, why don't you give us the reasons they are so different. You suggest it's only because the local leadership doesn't want rail. Support that conclusion with evidence, then. Show us that there has been no other issue aside from a lack of motivation. I look forward to your report.

One last question... why would it be wise for Columbus to push for an Amtrak line when 3 of the 4 states mentioned with Amtrak service- including Ohio- have steadily falling ridership and the other state, even with a proclaimed "massive" expansion, is flat? I'm not sure it would make sense to invest in something that is not competitive on price, speed, routes or ridership when it comes to national travel. But you tell us why it would be.
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Old 05-05-2019, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
2,179 posts, read 1,555,989 times
Reputation: 1979
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
You know it's true. Why you would spend so much time trashing Columbus without any specific axe to grind wouldn't make any sense. Aside from you and the guy from Minneapolis, the only people who talk about Columbus this much are natives and people from Cleveland who don't like that it's a rising city in the state relative to Cleveland. I don't live there now, but I am a native and lived there most of my life. I care about what happens there. So what's your excuse?

I don't know Phoenix's history with rail or why it's been easier there. You must or you wouldn't be saying as much. You also must know the history of rail in Columbus, right? You being the expert on the issue, why don't you give us the reasons they are so different. You suggest it's only because the local leadership doesn't want rail. Support that conclusion with evidence, then. Show us that there has been no other issue aside from a lack of motivation. I look forward to your report.

One last question... why would it be wise for Columbus to push for an Amtrak line when 3 of the 4 states mentioned with Amtrak service- including Ohio- have steadily falling ridership and the other state, even with a proclaimed "massive" expansion, is flat? I'm not sure it would make sense to invest in something that is not competitive on price, speed, routes or ridership when it comes to national travel. But you tell us why it would be.
I lived in Columbus longer than any other place in my life. Is that sufficient to comment in this sub forum, or is there some sort of application and vetting process I need to go through to have your endorsement as a commenter?

The local leadership, the state leadership, and the residents don't want it (local rail).

Columbus not having an Amtrak station isn't helping the ridership issues in the region. I checked Amtrak departures daily between Chicago and Milwaukee-is was like 7 (which is pathetic). Amtrak is something of a "use it or lose it" thing. There are so many Amtrak stations in southern California you can literally use it as a commuter rail to go to and from work in many cases.

If San Diego or Anaheim didn't have stations, the whole thing would start to fall apart and resemble intercity rail in the midwest. Do you begin to see the implications of one of the biggest cities in the midwest not having a station?
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Old 05-05-2019, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
15,415 posts, read 14,903,319 times
Reputation: 6882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Losfrisco View Post
I lived in Columbus longer than any other place in my life. Is that sufficient to comment in this sub forum, or is there some sort of application and vetting process I need to go through to have your endorsement as a commenter?

The local leadership, the state leadership, and the residents don't want it (local rail).

Columbus not having an Amtrak station isn't helping the ridership issues in the region. I checked Amtrak departures daily between Chicago and Milwaukee-is was like 7 (which is pathetic). Amtrak is something of a "use it or lose it" thing. There are so many Amtrak stations in southern California you can literally use it as a commuter rail to go to and from work in many cases.

If San Diego or Anaheim didn't have stations, the whole thing would start to fall apart and resemble intercity rail in the midwest. Do you begin to see the implications of one of the biggest cities in the midwest not having a station?
Okay, but why always so negative? I don't like Florida, obviously, but I don't troll the Florida forums telling them how much I think it sucks. Seems like a waste of energy to me and meant to just get a rise out of people.


This is just false. You really need to do your homework on this. Columbus has had multiple transit plans that included rail since 1980. Almost all of them didn't happen because of mistakes made, Republicans slashing funding for them (Kasich didn't just kill the 3-C rail project, he helped kill an 8-line rail plan for Columbus back when he lived in Westerville by targeting national transit funding specifically to make the Columbus project financially infeasible), or bad timing. All rail proposals that I've researched had majority public support. The only one that ever went to vote was in 1999, and that failed because of the confusing split ballot with poor language that was actually legally barred from mentioning rail at all. Mike Coleman's High Street trolley died because he happened to push it the year the Great Recession started. And let's not forget that state-level funding for mass transit in Ohio was only about $7 million in recent years. That won't even get you a mile of new rail line. So no, it's not just been a matter of lack of local support. You go to literally any social media platform for Columbus and there's always people asking when rail will be built. If you're going to make big proclamations that people in Columbus hate transit, then you need to back it up. History doesn't support that conclusion, though. You could argue that Columbus leadership have maybe taken too much time between proposals, or haven't done a good job selling their plans, or that they get lost sometimes going after other shiny technology like autonomous vehicles, but I don't think you can argue that no one wants transit there.


But that's the point, people aren't using Amtrak, and they're using it less and less. If Chicago routes aren't seeing traffic, why would the addition of Columbus change much? This suggests that an increasing number of people don't find value in the product it offers. You don't blame the customer when they don't buy what you're selling, you create a better product people want. Arguably, Amtrak is not doing enough to be competitive. To be fair, though, they're working with what they have. Rail transit in the US is woefully underfunded and ignored, and it shows. Ironically, back in I think 1972, a new style HSR passenger arrived in Columbus to show off the possible future of Amtrak. Obviously, we ended up not getting those trains really anywhere, let alone Columbus.
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Old 05-08-2019, 02:15 PM
 
Location: NKY's Campbell Co.
1,961 posts, read 4,279,925 times
Reputation: 1052
Quote:
Originally Posted by Losfrisco View Post
So you went to one of the most populated parts of the world, got on a major freeway....and there were other cars on the road? Wow.


So I guess the freeways in NY and DC metro are just empty because "everyone" is on the subway.

Los Angeles is building like crazy (five buildings over 500 feet already completed just this year including the tallest residential building in California) and it won't matter what "home owners" say because unlike Columbus, suburbanites don't dictate whether the city has things like skyscrapers or subways.
Doesn't mean the metro as a whole is bleeding people in the middle income brackets. Too expensive and that kind of building isn't sustainable. Ask Miami and its rows of glass condos that no one in the local market can afford. Just wealthy foreigners looking for places to park cash.

I see no point in continuing to argue with you. Obviously you have your own perspective that is a little rose-colored glasses in nature. I'll agree SD is nice, but LA can stay where its at.
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Old 05-08-2019, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
2,179 posts, read 1,555,989 times
Reputation: 1979
Quote:
Originally Posted by wrightflyer View Post
Doesn't mean the metro as a whole is bleeding people in the middle income brackets. Too expensive and that kind of building isn't sustainable. Ask Miami and its rows of glass condos that no one in the local market can afford. Just wealthy foreigners looking for places to park cash.
.
If people want to move into the desert for more living space, its a free country.

People don't go to New York City and say "you want HOW MUCH for a 2700 square foot, four bedroom house with a yard and two car garage?" because its generally understood that the attractions the city offers would be worth making do with smaller accommodations. Not sure why Los Angeles would be any different.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:13 PM
 
57 posts, read 27,184 times
Reputation: 95
I read a lot of the comments and most of them say to stay in Southern California and not to move to Columbus Ohio in particular. Some posters mentioned that Columbus lacked natural beauty. I seen pictures of the rural ohio landscape it looked like green rolling hills ..but maybe that's southern Ohio

Last edited by sidneyinmyeyes34; 05-22-2019 at 10:29 PM..
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Old 05-23-2019, 04:54 AM
 
134 posts, read 95,872 times
Reputation: 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by sidneyinmyeyes34 View Post
I read a lot of the comments and most of them say to stay in Southern California and not to move to Columbus Ohio in particular. Some posters mentioned that Columbus lacked natural beauty. I seen pictures of the rural ohio landscape it looked like green rolling hills ..but maybe that's southern Ohio
This is 39 miles south of Downtown Columbus.



There's plenty of beauty even within Columbus city limits. But because you have to actually go to the beauty and not just admire the mountain tops from 50 miles away Columbus apparently has no natural beauty
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Old 05-23-2019, 09:10 AM
 
37 posts, read 47,732 times
Reputation: 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by sidneyinmyeyes34 View Post
I read a lot of the comments and most of them say to stay in Southern California and not to move to Columbus Ohio in particular. Some posters mentioned that Columbus lacked natural beauty. I seen pictures of the rural ohio landscape it looked like green rolling hills ..but maybe that's southern Ohio
I am in SoCal and would move back to Columbus in a heartbeat if I could get out of here. Circumstances have me stuck. Ohio has lots of beauty. Amazing day trips can take you to different types (rolling hills, Amish Country, Lake Erie, smaller lakes, etc, etc.) And it is more peaceful. And not to mention better air quality.
It depends on what you enjoy and what you want. Each state has their pros and cons. For me, I can't wait to get back to Ohio.
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Old 05-23-2019, 09:37 AM
 
57 posts, read 27,184 times
Reputation: 95
I stand corrected...
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