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Old 09-09-2010, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
34,276 posts, read 59,597,037 times
Reputation: 33307

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I always wonder about the power supply in a name brand computer, since it seems that manufacturers use off-name, minimum spec units.
So, I am considering just replacing the PSU's in two Dells. "Delta." 360W.
Got a couple of USB error messages that could be linked to low power.

For $50-$60+/- on sale with rebates at NewEgg for high-rated Corsair, et al, why not?

But as I read the user reviews for most units, even with high ratings it always seems like 5%--10% are either DOA or suffer dramatic failure well within a year.

Is this how it has always been and I am just coming to the party?
Or is failure more common over the last couple of years?
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Old 09-09-2010, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,720 posts, read 25,902,245 times
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What are these USB messages that point to a PS problem?

That seems a bit strange to me. If you are using USB devices that depend on power through the USB connection - it has nothing to do with the power supply itself. It could be a marginal USB circuit instead.

As for power supply failure rates - it is important to remember that user reviews will probably have a disproportionate amount of bad reviews vs. good reviews. Unhappy buyers will vent more than happy buyers spread good news.

I have had one power supply fail in 15 years of desktop ownership - most of which I built. I had a very old Dell Dimension Pentium II system for ten years and the PS was still going when I donated the computer.

BTW - Corsair power supplies are excellent. Just so you know - Corsair units are made by Seasonic - even better units.
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Old 09-09-2010, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Pomona
1,955 posts, read 9,661,742 times
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Delta is not an off-brand. It's not a household name, but that's not their market anyways ...
Welcome to Delta Electronics, Inc.

As for USB power ... the issue may be moreso that the device requires more power than spec. A unit load on USB 2.0 is 100ma, and may supply up to a 500ma maximum. External hard drives can use more than that, however; an external powered hub is the solution here.
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Old 09-09-2010, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
34,276 posts, read 59,597,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
What are these USB messages that point to a PS problem?

That seems a bit strange to me. If you are using USB devices that depend on power through the USB connection - it has nothing to do with the power supply itself. It could be a marginal USB circuit instead.

As for power supply failure rates - it is important to remember that user reviews will probably have a disproportionate amount of bad reviews vs. good reviews. Unhappy buyers will vent more than happy buyers spread good news.

I have had one power supply fail in 15 years of desktop ownership - most of which I built. I had a very old Dell Dimension Pentium II system for ten years and the PS was still going when I donated the computer.

BTW - Corsair power supplies are excellent. Just so you know - Corsair units are made by Seasonic - even better units.

"Boot error message D0"
I have 2 of the Studio SPS 435MT
I found a couple of responses that indicated possibility of a tie-in to PSU instability.
I am typically paranoid on OEM computer power supplies, figure they often go first and had thought of replacing them anyway.

Actually, I recall that I got the error and boot failure when my HTC Evo phone was connected to USB on my home machine at boot up. But, I got it on my office machine and do not know what triggered it. I think it was a USB card reader that I pulled and don't have in at boot up anymore.

I know that more complainers than praisers will offer feedback and that Corsair has a good reputation. Likely better tahn my Delta OEM unit...
I can get a Corsair 650w psu from NewEgg today for $49.99 after rebate. 1189 feedbacks. 58 with one star. One whining about not getting his rebate, and the others about DOA and booming failure.
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Old 09-09-2010, 07:55 PM
 
10,752 posts, read 17,999,763 times
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I've noticed a high instance of capacitor failure, which results in failure of a device, be it power supply (PC & Mac), video card, motherboard (PC & Mac), router, LCD monitor, TV's, even the new digital to analog TV converters. Cheap parts don't last, but even expensive ones can fail.
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Old 09-10-2010, 06:23 PM
 
Location: 10110001010110100
6,385 posts, read 10,841,220 times
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Power Supply is the first and arguably one of the most important component to ensure a stable, strong running PC is the PSU, sadly it has been the most overlooked, neglected one by many including the PC Vendors.

Also another ignored fact is the proper grounding of the motherboard, most do not pay close attention to that. Lastly, using a decent, reliable UPS system. Surge protectors naturally do a half-ass job since they provide no protection against brown-outs (voltage drops) that are just as damaging to PSU and other components as surges (spikes), even the low end UPS systems typically provide this protection as their trigger logic is normally tied to voltage drops.

One last thing is, some people might be connecting too many power hungry devices to their surge protectors, when it should really be reserved for PC, monitor and couple of other low profile devices but definitely no heaters, fans or even printers of any kind should be connected to the surge protector where PC and monitor is also residing on.

During a thunderstorm and lightning times, everything should be disconnected from wall outlets and be kept at no less than 2 feet away.

Just my 2 cents.
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Old 09-10-2010, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Tyler, TX
15,209 posts, read 18,487,531 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurcoLoco View Post
PLastly, using a decent, reliable UPS system.
Stole my thunder.

Dirty power is responsible for much more data corruption and component failure than most people realize. You can extend the life of your system significantly by using a good battery.
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