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Old 09-09-2010, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Scranton
1,384 posts, read 2,760,818 times
Reputation: 1648

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Why even bother buying a good computer, or in my case, building a good computer? When you build it, it is top of the line. Awesome video card, plenty of RAM and HD, top of the line CPU, etc.... You look at the Best Buy ads, and smile and say "My computer is better than all of THAT".

6 months later, you see the Best Buy ad and their mainstream PC's are catching up to yours, but cost 1/3 of what you paid. You justify yourself by saying "Who needs that much RAM? At least mine still has a better video card than THAT."

1 year later, you see the Best Buy ad and their budget PC's can kick the butt of your custom built PC. You curl into fetal position and say to yourself "That can't be true. My computer is supposed to be better than THAT".
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Old 09-09-2010, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,815 posts, read 13,954,365 times
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Disagree. I just built a gaming PC for a buddy. $600 out the door.
Yea, it may be outdated in 2 years but it was still cheaper then buying something from bestbuy.
But for laptops I would agree.
Why pay $2,000 for a laptop? You will need a new one every 4-5 years anyway. Better off to buy a $600 laptop and replace it every 4 years. 2 $600 laptops still don't equal that one $2,000 laptop.
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Old 09-09-2010, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,345 posts, read 83,895,661 times
Reputation: 17566
Dell outlet. Most bang for the buck. No hassles. Lots of selection and drop down box filters.
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Old 09-09-2010, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Scranton
1,384 posts, read 2,760,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
Disagree. I just built a gaming PC for a buddy. $600 out the door.
Yea, it may be outdated in 2 years but it was still cheaper then buying something from bestbuy.
If you're building something that won't be outdated for 2 years, you'll have to spend a lot more than $600. I spent about $500 when I built mine, but that cost didn't include the video card, cd/dvd drives, HD, mouse, or keyboard, since I pulled those from my old PC (which wasn't that old to begin with). It also doesn't include the price of Windows, since I run Linux, which is free. If I wanted to add a high-end video card, new HD, optical drives, more RAM, a copy of Windows, and keyboard/mouse, the cost would've been closer to $1,000 or more.

For $600, assuming that you're building a complete PC (case, power supply, cooling fans, MB, CPU, RAM, dedicated video card, HD, optical drives) you'll probably looking at a MB with integrated graphics, low end CPU, or soon to be outdated MB chipset. If you're truly going top of the line, you'll spend $600 on just the MB, CPU, and RAM.
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Old 09-09-2010, 09:26 AM
 
7,376 posts, read 13,032,153 times
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I built a computer, cost me about 1k. This was almost 2 years ago. Still plays any game that comes out new on max settings. Not to mention if i need to i can upgrade it for only a couple hundred dollars with a better video card.
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Old 09-09-2010, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,720 posts, read 25,902,245 times
Reputation: 9219
A good homebuilt system will probably cost more than a brand name retail unit of the same or comparable specs.

You can't buy retail components at the same cost as Dell or HP.

But the components you buy are probably better quality, starting with the case and power supply. The HP motherboard may come from ASUS, but you find strange things like space for two more RAM sockets, but they aren't there.

Dell has in the past used non-standard power supply connectors and odd fan mounts.

Your own system is far more maintainable and upgradeable for years.
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Old 09-09-2010, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Pomona
1,955 posts, read 9,661,742 times
Reputation: 1538
Define "outdated", folks. For gaming, yeah ... one month, you're the tops, next month, you're not. A/V, graphic artists and code crunchers ... perhaps. Office apps and internet use ... no.

Bottom line ... different stokes for different folks. We still have a P3-1.0GHz at the office, and it still works. Having any computer that's worth over $100 isn't going to make a lick of difference when it comes to filling out and printing forms. Ditto with letters and spreadsheets ... the biggest limitation is the one entering the data, not the processor. Granted, the software (both the OS and the applications) do factor into all this too, and running the "latest and greatest" is not a necessity.

OTOH, the engineering department can always use something faster. Still, they don't go high-end, as any mid-market computer is going to be faster than what was out a few years back already, so such would already be an upgrade.
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Old 09-09-2010, 10:38 AM
 
28,607 posts, read 40,583,741 times
Reputation: 37262
I'm with Narfcake. If all you want is the latest and greatest then prepare yourself to spend the money to keep up.

Personal experience (25 years in the PC biz) says it's not important unless you are in a high production environment that pays back the investment quickly or an addicted game player.
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Old 09-09-2010, 11:02 AM
 
11,715 posts, read 36,330,137 times
Reputation: 7514
Why buy anything good then? Do you take this approach with cars or tools? I build a nice computer because I expect to get several years out of it and know I can repair/upgrade it along the way. Don't confuse specs with quality and actual performance. You can get a lot of big numbers on the spec sheet really cheaply, but its just that, cheap. I don't build the highest spec machine possible, but I build quality.
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Old 09-09-2010, 11:44 AM
 
3,743 posts, read 11,462,616 times
Reputation: 2754
Imo, you're just looking at hardware, and that's only part of what makes up the computer system.

At any rate, since the technology, software and hardware are always advancing, and pretty quickly at that, you should always buy the latest and greatest within the cost curve that is in your budget imo to get the most usable life and utility from it. Your argument is like the why make the bed argument.
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