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Old 09-10-2010, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Wicker Park, Chicago
4,791 posts, read 13,329,995 times
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Last year in the Philippines there was a flood in Manila called Ondoy and you can Youtube videos of it to see it. It flooded many homes and destroyed lots of property. Well, I'm wondering if I gave a desktop to my cousin would it survive another flood?

Any of you ever have your desktop completely submerged in a flood? Afterwards did you clean it out with water and then dried it... did it work afterwards?
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Old 09-10-2010, 06:08 PM
 
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Why would you expect any electronic device to survive a flood unless it was high enough to stay dry?
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Old 09-10-2010, 06:08 PM
 
Location: In a house
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Likely not, because likely the water in a flood isn't just water, and the assorted random chemicals, effluvium, and toxic waste would corrode any metallic parts.

The keyboard however might be salvageable if you were to rinse it thoroughly in tepid soapy water, then rinse it again to clear it of any/all soap, then leave it upside down to dry. The mouse would be hosed.
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Old 09-10-2010, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Wicker Park, Chicago
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All of my cousin's digital cameras were destroyed by the flood. I'm just wondering if a desktop can survive...
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Old 09-10-2010, 08:01 PM
 
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The data on the drives might be recoverable from professional service that specializes in water/fire damage for a ridiculous amount of money. They disassemble them, remove and clean the platters which hold the data. Then they reassemble the platter into a temporary housing to try and extract the data. Quite successfully from my understanding.

Don't quote me but I believe most drives are water resistant and you may be able to dry out the exterior and plug it into another computer. Not something I would do myself because if there is water/dirt inside you might cause irreversible data loss.
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Old 09-10-2010, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Wicker Park, Chicago
4,791 posts, read 13,329,995 times
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Yeah, I think hd's are waterproof but I don't want to test that theory. Water and dirt on a motherboard, vc, ps, - can all be cleaned and blasted by water...

This is the type of dirty flood that can happen in the Philippines --

YouTube - Typhoon Ondoy, flood reached to 7ft by 6 PM, Sept. 26, 2009
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Old 09-10-2010, 11:47 PM
 
Location: 10110001010110100
6,385 posts, read 10,845,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
The data on the drives might be recoverable from professional service that specializes in water/fire damage for a ridiculous amount of money. They disassemble them, remove and clean the platters which hold the data. Then they reassemble the platter into a temporary housing to try and extract the data. Quite successfully from my understanding.

Don't quote me but I believe most drives are water resistant and you may be able to dry out the exterior and plug it into another computer. Not something I would do myself because if there is water/dirt inside you might cause irreversible data loss.
Hard Drives are air tight, not certain about the Solid States but the conventional hard drive would not let any liquid or air in it, it should not.

Plain water should not cause any damage if:
Unit was not in use and was not plugged in, however the battery on the mobo is a concern as it still provides power to the CMOS chip meaning there is still some current somewhere on the motherboard. CPU and RAM should not be effected however, PSU and Optical drives probably would.
I have an old system and I am thinking about doing this just for giggles however the 2 important variable would be:
- How long is the PC submerged under water for?
- Was the water properly drained/rinsed out of the PC and was all the components completely dry before plugging it in an outlet?

I would most certain drain the bulk of the water by opening both sides of the case and shaking the case as I turn each side facing down a few times.

Then, take all components out of the case, completely disassemble everything including the PSU and CPU. Investigate each and every component, carefully dry them, preferably using compressed air or a hair dryer as a last resort. Leave components out where there is some sort of a breeze but make sure they are not exposed to direct sunlight, wait a few days or longer if you must. Then if they all look dry with no apparent damages, assemble and test. I would probably plug in the PSU by itself and use one of those $10 PSU tester to check to see if it worked before connecting it to the rest of the stuff. In case if it shorts, it wouldn't take the other components along with it.

Another, and possibly a smarter idea (if applicable): tell your cousin to move to a higher floor!
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Old 09-11-2010, 07:58 PM
 
422 posts, read 652,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
Likely not, because likely the water in a flood isn't just water, and the assorted random chemicals, effluvium, and toxic waste would corrode any metallic parts.

The keyboard however might be salvageable if you were to rinse it thoroughly in tepid soapy water, then rinse it again to clear it of any/all soap, then leave it upside down to dry. The mouse would be hosed.
Yup. If it was pure water (not even salt water), you could probably submerge certain parts in water and then dry it COMPLETELY for several days and it would work. All this as long as it was not plugged it.

Are you trying to recover data? It seems so.

HDDs are NOT waterproof or airproof! Why would anyone think such a thing? There is even a hole on the bottom of most with a "do not cover" message, for ventilation.
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Old 09-11-2010, 09:58 PM
 
Location: 10110001010110100
6,385 posts, read 10,845,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dougstech View Post
HDDs are NOT waterproof or airproof! Why would anyone think such a thing? There is even a hole on the bottom of most with a "do not cover" message, for ventilation.
Well, I stand corrected, I don't believe the older drives had such a hole nor needed one. They were completely airtight to prevent any kind of contamination. The space between the head and the platter is incredibly small so even a cigarette smoke could be harmful.

Oh well, I guess tell your cousin to get a HD snorkel just in case!
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,345 posts, read 83,926,729 times
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I back up our valuable electronic data (family photos for example) in a safe deposit box. And, paranoid Charles will seek a credit union safe deposit box located in non flood prone places and on the highest box in the vault (just in case there is a weird local flood like a pipe burst or fire sprinklers).
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