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Old 09-21-2010, 09:31 PM
 
3,651 posts, read 8,375,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
While your average home user has embraced 7,
The only reason people "embraced" 7 was because it didn't suck like Vista did, plus the vast majority of home users are still stupid/pathetic enough to be obsessed with this "I have to have the newest" idiocy.

Quote:
Like it or not, the continued dominance of XP is holding back technology advancement,
Hardly.

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yet I completely understand the rationale for sticking with XP as it still does everything most businesses need and power users prefer the increased control XP gives them over their system vs the newer versions, as well as the light footprint. There is nothing that Windows 7 offers that can win over these people...they will not upgrade just for the sake of upgrading.
Exactly......businesses FINALLY got the clue which the mindless consumer will never get.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Its time to face it, XP is a decade old..its time to move on. Thus far however, there has not been an economically feasible successor from Microsoft.
Which is exactly why it's NOT "time to move on." Who cares how old it is? This isn't a blind date we're talking about but an OS.

I would happily ditch freakin Vista to "upgrade" to XP if I could and ditto if I had Win 7.

PS and oh btw can MS pls make up their alleged minds about whether to use version numbers or not


Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Vista/7 was a huge step forward for consumers.
LOL

My drink almost came out of my nose on that one.
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Old 09-21-2010, 10:36 PM
 
Location: sowf jawja
1,940 posts, read 8,305,853 times
Reputation: 1042
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazznblues View Post
Businesses are always laggards. The #1 reason they delay upgrades is when their critical business applications don't run on a new OS. Companies like Oracle, apps like Siebel, etc. are notoriously slow moving to a new OS.
that's it in our office.

we have thousands of dollars in specialty software that is only tested on windows xp; if we moved to windows 7, an unsupported OS, the manufacturers wouldn't provide tech support.

it has to work every day, and there's no point and risking anything.

other than using our industry specific software, they only need the ability to check email and type a document. xp does that just fine.

we've even got some new dell's and ordered them w/ the xp downgrade.


i upgraded to windows 7 @ home, primarily for the new windows media center features.
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Old 09-23-2010, 02:14 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,226,323 times
Reputation: 4522
Quote:
Originally Posted by joey2000 View Post
Which is exactly why it's NOT "time to move on." Who cares how old it is? This isn't a blind date we're talking about but an OS.

I would happily ditch freakin Vista to "upgrade" to XP if I could and ditto if I had Win 7.
How long do you think the average user should cling to XP? 2015? 2020? 2030? Beyond?

Reality check: Technology changes. Yes, there will probably be specialized computers in business environments that run it for another 10-20 years because their software won't run on anything else...much like some businesses still have machines running DOS or NT4 for this purpose, but IT departments in general will probably move on from XP sometime within the next five years at the latest. Whether thats sooner or later depends on what Windows 8 brings to the table.

Now on the consumer side, I see absolutely NO reason to buy/build a new PC with XP instead of 7 (notice I didn't say people who bought computers during the XP era should upgrade). XP is on its way out with home users as more of them are upgrading their machines and 7 is good enough out of the box less see a need to downgrade to XP. Gamers are still clinging to XP but that will soon change as more games take advantage of DX10 and DX11...and the fact that 2GB of RAM is no longer enough for a hardcore gamer. The RAM limit on XP will likely be its death, as it cannot handle more than 3.2 GB of RAM. Yes, there's XP 64 but there are so many compatibility issues with that you'll have better luck just using 7.

Finally, I just don't understand why power users are rocking XP on i7 machines with 6GB of RAM, especially if they aren't running any specialized software that needs XP. Then again, this is the same group that held on to Windows 2000 through most of the XP era, complaining that XP "dumbed it down" or was too "fisher price".

Quote:
Originally Posted by joey2000 View Post
LOL

My drink almost came out of my nose on that one.
It took Vista to get 7...which most people would agree 7 is a huge step forward, especially on the consumer side. See my comments above.
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Old 09-23-2010, 11:34 AM
 
3,651 posts, read 8,375,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
How long do you think the average user should cling to XP? 2015? 2020? 2030? Beyond?
As long as it does everything it needs to do, that's how long. Obviously that will vary. For me, that could've easily been many years, but sadly my old PC died, I had to get a new one, and didn't know what POS Vista was and so declined the option to have XP installed along with Vista. d'oh.


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Now on the consumer side, I see absolutely NO reason to buy/build a new PC with XP instead of 7
I can't say for sure since 7 has a smaller footprint than Vista, but I'm betting machines still run faster with XP (esp if pushed to extremes) and take up less space. Course with HDs getting silly big that might not matter much either. Bottom line for me is if someone can't show me what a new version buys me, I'll pass.

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It took Vista to get 7...which most people would agree 7 is a huge step forward, especially on the consumer side.
Still not seeing why. Seems to me like a keeping up w/the Joneses bit. If you're a casual PC user - and I t hink most adults are ie not hard-core gamers etc - XP is already plenty.
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Old 09-23-2010, 12:58 PM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,268,988 times
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In the business world, upgrading to "the new version" is a business decision, and not a vanity or 'gotta have the latest version' drive. WHEN the benefit of an upgrade out weighs the cost, then business will upgrade. While that formula is upside down, it is bad business practice to upgrade, especially in today's economy.
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Old 09-23-2010, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,226,323 times
Reputation: 4522
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asheville Native View Post
In the business world, upgrading to "the new version" is a business decision, and not a vanity or 'gotta have the latest version' drive. WHEN the benefit of an upgrade out weighs the cost, then business will upgrade. While that formula is upside down, it is bad business practice to upgrade, especially in today's economy.
Won't the current policy of downgrading new machines to XP cost more in the long run when businesses finally do make the jump to 7 (or 8)? Seems to me the most economical thing to do would be to slowly upgrade as machines are replaced.
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Old 09-23-2010, 05:35 PM
 
11,715 posts, read 36,343,249 times
Reputation: 7514
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Won't the current policy of downgrading new machines to XP cost more in the long run when businesses finally do make the jump to 7 (or 8)? Seems to me the most economical thing to do would be to slowly upgrade as machines are replaced.
When you buy a business PC with XP today, you're also getting a Win7 license. Should it ever be needed, its just a matter of re-imaging with Win7. But as others have said, if XP does the job and you're dependent on older software, it's FAR more expensive to upgrade everything else to be Win7 compatible that it is to just stick with XP.
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Old 09-24-2010, 09:13 AM
 
Location: WV and Eastport, ME
11,733 posts, read 11,311,179 times
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Here's why businesses don't do that. Yesterday a new machine was installed with Win 7 & Office 07. The user opened a shared database without issue until another user tried to access it, just like they have done for several years. When the XP/Office 07 machine opened the database, an error was created and the database file was corrupted, requiring restoration from a backup. Today we're trying to solve the problem. Had we upgraded all the machines at the same time, it wouldn't have happened.
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Old 09-24-2010, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Pomona
1,955 posts, read 9,665,693 times
Reputation: 1538
Quote:
Originally Posted by mensaguy View Post
Today we're trying to solve the problem.
On the corollary, it is a way that IT departments create work.

1. Upgrade computer
2. Have problems with upgrade.
3. Create a resolution.
4. Profit!

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Had we upgraded all the machines at the same time, it wouldn't have happened.
Yeah, with some systems, it's an all-or-nothing affair. Also, it's why some prefer other database vendors; the program accessing it may vary, but the database is kept the same format.
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Old 09-24-2010, 11:15 AM
 
Location: WV and Eastport, ME
11,733 posts, read 11,311,179 times
Reputation: 7705
I don't know where you're going with that. Nobody's trying to create work. It just happened, and IT, as a part of an organization, doesn't profit. Are you suggesting that we should be using Oracle for a small database that 6 people use? I think Access makes sense for those kinds of things.
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