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View Poll Results: Will Apple ever overrtake Windows machines for personal/home use?
Yes 18 19.35%
No 75 80.65%
Voters: 93. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-01-2010, 09:04 PM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,982,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
The fact of the matter is if you take a Macintosh, Linux and a PC that are built with the same Intel motherboard, CPU, RAM and comparable video cards, and then use the same bench test mark you will find you spent $9.000 to learn there isn't a nickles worth of difference between them when it comes to raw performance.

The rest is smoke and mirrors except ... Mac doesn't catch PC Viruses or throw a BSOD, and PC users have never seen a KP.or caught a unix virus.

The PC was an IBM creation. Apple designs and sells a Macintosh computer which includes Apple software for destops and servers. It does not produce PCs.. MS produces software. There is no "Windows" computer; it is a PC running a MS operating system. The Macintosh is an Apple computer running Apple software on a Apple modified Unix platform

I have quad core 64 bit Win 7 and 64 bit Snow Leopard machines networked along with dual core Leopard machines and a single processor XP. Some are wireless, some are not..They all do the same thing. The only difference is how fast and how well each machine compiles data.

To my knolege the last manufacture that built a desktop Personal Computer and wrote its own OS and software for that computer was IBM -- and that was pre-Windows. Apple still designs its own Macintosh machines and Apple software.

If you compare something try MS vs Unix software.

It's a shame that you wrote all that without reading inbetween the lines of the OP. Obviously it was implied that the OP was talking about the Windows Platform vs the Apple Platform. These are two very comparable platforms.

Apple makes technology easy to use and markets extremely well. Microsoft makes technology. The question is which one will be able to bleed into eachother's perfection. My guess is Microsoft will continue to prevail because money can buy good marketing. Money cannot buy good innovation.
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Old 10-01-2010, 10:02 PM
 
15,924 posts, read 17,657,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xavierob82 View Post
Especially once people realize how notoriously unreliable, slow, virus-prone, and complete pieces of worthless junk that Windows PCs are?

I can understand workplaces purchasing Windows machines for employees, since they are cheaper, but why would anyone choose to buy a Windows PC over an Apple macbook for personal use?
Here we go for the bazillionth time, OS wars.

I own both, and each has their strengths and weaknesses
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Old 10-02-2010, 12:50 AM
 
1,160 posts, read 2,096,291 times
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"Will Apple ever overrtake Windows machines for personal/home use?"

This is sort of like asking if more people will eventually buy Jaguar convertibles than Toyota Camrys. Of course they won't. But I like it that way. Apple products aren't meant for the Joe Q. Computer User.

I own two Apple laptops and love 'em to death. They're like little tanks, indestructible and functional, given what I use them for, personally.
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Old 10-02-2010, 01:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Melissa78703 View Post
"Will Apple ever overrtake Windows machines for personal/home use?"

This is sort of like asking if more people will eventually buy Jaguar convertibles than Toyota Camrys. Of course they won't. But I like it that way. Apple products aren't meant for the Joe Q. Computer User.

I own two Apple laptops and love 'em to death. They're like little tanks, indestructible and functional, given what I use them for, personally.
PCs are like tanks too if you buy the right ones. Comparing Apple vs Windows to Jag vs Camry is a horrible comparison.

A better comparison is Suburu to Toyota. Jaguar (solid, reliable, excellent company, ruined by bad management until recently, capable, but not everyone wants them) is Apple while VolksWagon (solid, reliable, available in all flavors from Audi line to to the simple beetle).


I own two Apple laptops, one Dell Latitude and one IBM Thinkpad. I also own Windows Home media server, and a Windows based gaming machine.
What's funny about all this is that if it weren't for Bill Gates helping Apple, they probably wouldn't have made it.
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Old 10-02-2010, 02:56 AM
 
Location: USA
701 posts, read 994,547 times
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Apple overtaking Microsoft? Anything's possible. After all, AT&T went from being the most dominant company in the world to almost a penny stock until their name got bought by SBC.

Personally, I like Windows 7 and I don't see any competitor threatening the other Microsoft cash cow, MS Office. So with their dominance in the OS, Applications and Development tools markets, I really don't see Apple overtaking Microsoft anytime soon.

And they don't have to. Apple is very profitable right now, being the smaller player. And I think they'll continue to grow in the mobile arena. I read somewhere, I think it was Forbes magazine, where they credit severa; Apple executives for the slew of successes in recent years. About how Apple was in good, capable hands even as Steve Jobs steps down in the next few years because they have several people in place, leading the company.

There are several articles on "Apple without Steve Jobs". This one is old, but still interesting: Yes, Apple Can Survive Without Steve Jobs | Fast Company

As far as "Microsoft saving Apple" in the 90's, there are other opinions on that: Stop the lies! The day that Microsoft 'saved' Apple | ZDNet

As a kid, my family had an Apple II computer in 1980, and the IBM PC XT and AT later, I remember how Microsoft was a small time software company that barely anyone had ever heard of. Wordperfect, Lotus 123 and DBase were the dominant software products at the time. Apple did kind of "save" Microsoft at the time, by helping them get MS Word and Excel on the Apple computers.

Here's a better picture of the situation back in the 80's: The money made by Microsoft, Apple and Google, 1985 until today | Royal Pingdom

And OS History: SCO, Linux, and Microsoft in the History of OS: 1980s — RoughlyDrafted Magazine
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Old 10-02-2010, 03:00 AM
 
2,385 posts, read 3,869,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xavierob82 View Post
Especially once people realize how notoriously unreliable, slow, virus-prone, and complete pieces of worthless junk that Windows PCs are?

I can understand workplaces purchasing Windows machines for employees, since they are cheaper, but why would anyone choose to buy a Windows PC over an Apple macbook for personal use?
Because the people who know what they're doing with computers can modify Windows anyway they want and fix any problem they have with them. They're scared to come over to Apple where the OS and troubleshooting is not as flexible. Also, people with PCs like to tinker with them, like some people like to do with old cars, it's a hobby and they can't really do that the same way with a Mac.

So in short, Macs are for people who just want the computer to do its job, PCs are for people who want to customize everything and who enjoy troubleshooting their own problems.
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Old 10-02-2010, 03:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fastninja500 View Post

As far as "Microsoft saving Apple" in the 90's, there are other opinions on that: Stop the lies! The day that Microsoft 'saved' Apple | ZDNet
That article is only about the 90's. So it fails to mention anything about floating point interpreter in the 70's. In the 70's Apple and Microsoft had a codependent relationship in the consumer (rather hobby) market.
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Old 10-02-2010, 04:49 AM
 
Location: Itinerant
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harveypooka View Post
I ran these tests months ago and things have improved since then. Please bear in mind that the Source engine was developed for Windows, not Mac OS X. It takes time working with Apple, AMD/NVIDIA and specific developers to improve performance. Look at something like World of Warcraft for more informative results. It's been on both platforms longer so it's a better judge.
So then I should call you "Alex McLarty" then, and in 4 months the Mac versions have had a 3 fold increase in frame rate...? Gimme a break. The Source Engine is 90% platform agnostic, it's linked to Valves own libraries, and provides the general AI, Engine, physics, meshes, textures and light sourcing. It's only the remaining 10% that relies on API's in Apples case primarily OpenGL, in Windows case DirectX 9 (or OpenGL). If this frame rate increase is accurate then please supply your benchmark data. However it still doesn't explain why the system specs for HL2 for PC are much lower than Mac.

Using WoW is a bit of a red herring (you could have gone all the way and said Tetris) minimum system requirements are a GeForce 2 and it was developed as a DX7 game. There is no current Mac hardware that only has a DX7 compatible graphics processor. Even on release it was hardly a seriously graphics intensive application (one of the problems of MMO games is they need a larger market, so more generic system requirements). On release in 2004 it only needed a 32Mb video card, with HW T&L.


Quote:
Originally Posted by harveypooka View Post
What competition? There aren't many tablets out in the wild. Samsung are coming out with the Tab (more expensive than the iPad) and RIM have just announced their Playbook. There's little competition...yet.
Either you've only just recently gotten interested in computers, or your ignoring a section of the market. Microsoft Windows XP Tablet has been around for a long time, tablet extensions exist in Vista, and Win 7 has Surface integration then there's the UMPC's like the Samsung Q1 (running Embedded, or XP Tablet, or later Windows OS). Finally there's Maemo (Linux tablet) has been around for 5, the latest release has been rebadged MeeGo. Tablets have been around for about 10 years, I've personally owned 3.

However my original statement (that you're responding to) was more to the iPhone, with Android having no barriers to entry for developers, and no infamous approval (or lack thereof) process needed. Although at the end of the day the iPad is just a larger version of the iPhone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by harveypooka View Post
iOS is different from Android or Chrome. It's closely monitored, limited but it does what it does very well. There have been killer apps for iPhone and iPad - mostly games.
From what I can tell most of the games are ports from PC, Console, or even iPhone. If it wasn't for Firemint I don't think that there's an iPad/iPhone game that isn't either a port or direct rip off of a PC or Console game there's at least one Zuma clone in many top 25 games, and Plants vs. Zombies (another oft cited top 25) while cute is not what I'd consider a killer title. Some of these may be killer apps (Mirrors Edge for one was perhaps one of the most underrated games of 2007) on their original platform, but certainly not when they're a port to something else. Take Halo, killer title (or more accurately Console Maker) on Xbox, not a killer title on PC. Some of the ports are downright embarrassing Monkey Island 2, IIRC I was disk swapping 3.5" floppies on my PC playing that, and Broken Sword a remake of a 15 year old game, the only value these have is nostalgia.

No iOS isn't really different than Android, Windows Mobile, Symbian or RIM its a system to allow users to launch applications, store and retrieve data (either locally or remotely), in a way that takes advantage of an intuitive GUI, it should also facilitate application development and platform extension; anything that you believe it is that is more than that is purely imagination.
BTW Isn't chrome a browser...?

Quote:
Originally Posted by harveypooka View Post
Oranges and apples.
Navels and Mandarins is more accurate.
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Old 10-02-2010, 11:14 AM
 
28,648 posts, read 40,627,244 times
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Easy answer: No.
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Old 10-02-2010, 12:36 PM
 
Location: USA
701 posts, read 994,547 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
That article is only about the 90's. So it fails to mention anything about floating point interpreter in the 70's. In the 70's Apple and Microsoft had a codependent relationship in the consumer (rather hobby) market.
Sorry, I just had to put in my 2-cents there, in the interest of accuracy.
I have nothing against Microsoft nor Apple nor IBM. I admire all these companies and actually own stock in all three.

Yes, you're right. This article only addressed the 90's. But when most folks talk about "Microsoft saving Apple", they usually refer to the $150M that Microsoft invested in Apple stock back in 97 or 98. I just wanted to give the other side of that story.

As for the floating point interpreter that Apple licensed from Microsoft in the 70's, ... well, I don't know that they "saved" Apple because of that. That's like Microsoft "saving" IBM by licensing DOS to them.

I learned to program Apple Basic on the Apple II and read something about that back then in one of the boards. Like you said, Apple and Microsoft, along with most of the "hobbyist companies" had a co-dependent relationship. In fact, most hobbyists shared their code freely and built on each others code. The same thing still goes on today for a lot of programmers/hacker. Bill Gates made waves then when he wanted to charge for their code, as that kind of went against the hobbyist ethic.
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