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Old 11-04-2010, 09:47 PM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,955,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
It may come to the powers that be to do so. Theft is theft.
There is no theft going on. You cannot have posession of a song or movie. You can only have permission to use it. When you download a pirated song, you are making illegal use of that song. Not stealing it.
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Old 11-04-2010, 10:11 PM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,955,968 times
Reputation: 12847
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgomez912 View Post
If they really wanted to crack down on illegal downloads they would require ISPs to either block known torrent sites or notify the police if your IP downloads from them. It would be simply for the ISP to put a tracker on their network to notify them when users access certain sites since thats how they find child porn users from the sites the access.
This can easily be circumvented.
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Old 11-04-2010, 10:17 PM
 
713 posts, read 3,171,462 times
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Still it would catch those who are not that smart which is half the internet users out there
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Old 11-04-2010, 10:45 PM
 
3,614 posts, read 3,090,722 times
Reputation: 909
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgomez912
If they really wanted to crack down on illegal downloads they would require ISPs to either block known torrent sites or notify the police if your IP downloads from them. It would be simply for the ISP to put a tracker on their network to notify them when users access certain sites since thats how they find child porn users from the sites the access.
Pending Net Neutraility laws, such an action would be illegal. There is nothing wrong with torrent sites, programs, or the users who download them and use these websites. The "problem" is those who share material against the owner of that materials policy. "Illegal downloading" is just "illegal sharing" as NJBest points out. If a software developer offers his\her\their software available for download via crowd-sourced p2p protocols, I'm always preferring that method. Less stress on the host and developer of that software. Likewise, you can (and will) find legal material on file-sharing websites and applications.

To ban p2p websites and applications for illegal activities of its users would be akin to banning Microsoft Pain, GIMP, or Photoshop because people can edit photos that don't belong to them and have no legal right to edit. It doesn't make any sense what so ever.
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Old 11-05-2010, 12:01 PM
 
11,127 posts, read 12,800,829 times
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Just a quick reminder folks, the premise of this discussion is great, but lets not stray too far or promote activities to other members which may be illegal or unethical. Many of the laws surrounding this aspect of file sharing on the net are still pending, so just be careful in the advice we dispense. Sound reasonable?

Thanks.
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Old 11-05-2010, 02:35 PM
 
Location: In Phoenix by way of San Antonio
1,682 posts, read 2,750,327 times
Reputation: 1247
There still is Frostwire, Limewire's lil bro. Get it while you can!
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Old 11-06-2010, 07:26 PM
 
40,169 posts, read 41,775,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EscapeCalifornia View Post
And what percentage of P2P traffic is that compared to "sharing" rips of commerical CDs?

I have a piece of analog video equipment called a TBC that can fix timing errors common on VHS recordings. It will also eliminate the Macrovison copy protection used on commercial tapes and analog outlets on a DVD player.

This device would certainly be of more interest to those looking to make illegal copies, should I be denied the ability to fix home recordings because of this?
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Old 11-06-2010, 07:46 PM
 
11,715 posts, read 36,330,137 times
Reputation: 7514
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
I have a piece of analog video equipment called a TBC that can fix timing errors common on VHS recordings. It will also eliminate the Macrovison copy protection used on commercial tapes and analog outlets on a DVD player.

This device would certainly be of more interest to those looking to make illegal copies, should I be denied the ability to fix home recordings because of this?
Yes I've heard that argument before. But when a product or place becomes overwhelmingly associated with illegal activity, it draws attention and gets shut down. Its no different than when a liquor store gets known as the place for minors to buy, even if the store makes legal sales too, the ABC will cite them and eventually pull their license.
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Old 11-06-2010, 07:58 PM
 
Location: The Woods
17,084 posts, read 22,598,172 times
Reputation: 9373
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
An orange jumpsuit for ten years may slow it down though.
I find the notion of putting someone in prison for 10 years of their life, and spending piles of tax money to do it, over a few dollars of music, to be repulsive. In some cases we're talking music that was originally recorded decades ago (or longer, I know of record companies owning the rights to recordings over a century old, refusing to allow them to be copied, when they don't even re-issue them, which is simply a waste in multiple ways), whose actual creators are dead...sorry, I don't support copyrights after the original artist/creator is dead. Patents generally expire much earlier, for instance.

Perhaps the recording industry should accept that their early 20th century business model and the laws they created, are dead and worthless now that the internet is here. They lost any sympathy with me when they filed absurd lawsuits against vulnerable and ignorant targets. The intelligent people don't get caught anyways. The record companies aren't going after the well off who could defend themselves (they've lost major cases when they picked the wrong targets).
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Old 11-06-2010, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 41,840,053 times
Reputation: 10962
I'm surprised that these sites aren't shut down quickly, after the Napster debacle.

The RIAA just got done having a multimillion judgement against a private citizen for downloading songs.
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