U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Computers
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-21-2011, 11:50 AM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,968,627 times
Reputation: 12847

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by ragnarkar View Post
And those faster computers will be capable of generating cutting-edge uncrackable keys...
That's true and it seems likely that you would re-encrypt everything over time to keep encryption updated.

But, that assumes that all older lower-quality encrypted files are completely removed from the cloud. And there's not any way of knowing that. So along with your highly encrypted files, you also have the possibility of lower quality files being present... defeating the purpose.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-21-2011, 02:45 PM
 
40,212 posts, read 41,808,108 times
Reputation: 16755
Quote:
Originally Posted by kazyn View Post
I upload all my important pictures and videos to a photobucket pro account. $25/year (I got it free through trialpay), FTP access, unlimited bandwidth and space.
As a backup this is fine idea but really bad idea for your only copy. If photobucket goes out business tomorrow you would be toast if it were the only copy. You still need local storage for a primary copy/backup.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2011, 04:08 PM
 
2,182 posts, read 4,706,733 times
Reputation: 1206
Quote:
Originally Posted by le roi View Post
that makes no sense in relation to my post; it doesn't clear up anything i said, or answer anything i asked.
Seriously?

Sigh. Fine, here we go.

First, lets clear up some things. Here's how "cloud computing" works.

You create something locally. You upload that something to the "cloud." From there, it is accessible anywhere via the server you uploaded to.

It's that simple.

Quote:
Originally Posted by le roi View Post
but this "cloud" uses your internet bandwidth, right?
Initially, yes. You upload things (pictures, documents, etc) to a server somewhere (aka, the "cloud")...whether it be google's servers, amazon, etc. doesn't matter (beyond the scope of this discussion).

Once you upload something to those servers, to the "cloud" - you no longer use your internet connection to host those items for you to see on your phone, or another computer, or wherever. That is all hosted from the server you uploaded to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by le roi View Post
unless something drastically changed in the past few years, that is more expensive and slower than the connection between your CPU and your local drive.
Obviously, it is much slower to upload to the cloud than to save to your hard drive, and you have to have paid for an Internet connection to begin with.

I think the point is being lost here. No, this will never, ever replace local disks entirely. You will never see the day where you create something and save it over a wire to a server somewhere, rather than saving it locally first. It simply will not happen. It can't, it's far too risky. What if the connection goes out while you're saving? Plus, you'd have to have either a ****-load of RAM to house the unsaved document/project/whatever, or a drive big enough to host a swap file or pagefile of some sort, which....by definition, would NOT be cloud-only computing.

I do see more node computing (dumb terminals, and server-side applications) happening in the workforce, but for a regular person, on a personal computer, nah.

Google's chromebook is a step to cloud-only computing, but it's more about not so much creating something and uploading it, but rather creating something server-side, there is no uploading to be done. Think Google Docs, for example. You don't create a spreadsheet locally and then upload it, you create it on Google's side of the cord.

I hope this clears the mud a bit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2011, 06:45 PM
 
11,715 posts, read 36,339,299 times
Reputation: 7514
Quote:
Originally Posted by kazyn View Post
Once you upload something to those servers, to the "cloud" - you no longer use your internet connection to host those items for you to see on your phone, or another computer, or wherever. That is all hosted from the server you uploaded to.
You just use your Internet connection every time you access a file. If my photo library were stored remotely instead of locally, I'd burn 12MB of bandwidth every time I opened a file. If my video collection were stored remotely, I'd burn ~600MB every time I played a 45 minute TV episode. ISP bandwidth caps or some metering scheme are going to throw a big wet blanket on the idea of storing everything in the cloud.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2011, 06:56 PM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,265,774 times
Reputation: 8302
When I get old and stupid enough to trust for profit companies with the safe keeping of all my stuff, but not until. They don't have my best interest at heart, their bottom line is all they can see.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2011, 07:28 PM
 
2,182 posts, read 4,706,733 times
Reputation: 1206
Quote:
Originally Posted by EscapeCalifornia View Post
You just use your Internet connection every time you access a file. If my photo library were stored remotely instead of locally, I'd burn 12MB of bandwidth every time I opened a file. If my video collection were stored remotely, I'd burn ~600MB every time I played a 45 minute TV episode. ISP bandwidth caps or some metering scheme are going to throw a big wet blanket on the idea of storing everything in the cloud.
Well of course, but the point of uploading is to view them elsewhere, or as a backup. There wouldn't be much point in uploading things just to view locally anyway.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2011, 07:30 PM
 
11,715 posts, read 36,339,299 times
Reputation: 7514
Quote:
Originally Posted by kazyn View Post
Well of course, but the point of uploading is to view them elsewhere, or as a backup. There wouldn't be much point in uploading things just to view locally anyway.
But the OP's idea was that we'd just stick everything in the cloud and not have local storage.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2011, 07:00 AM
 
22,779 posts, read 26,638,788 times
Reputation: 14580
Quote:
Originally Posted by kazyn View Post
Initially, yes. You upload things (pictures, documents, etc) to a server somewhere (aka, the "cloud")...whether it be google's servers, amazon, etc. doesn't matter (beyond the scope of this discussion).

Once you upload something to those servers, to the "cloud" - you no longer use your internet connection to host those items for you to see on your phone, or another computer, or wherever. That is all hosted from the server you uploaded to.
So you're saying I use my internet connection to upload into the cloud.

And then when I want to download from the cloud, to retrieve that data, I use..... what? magic? My understanding is that it was using an internet connection to download from the cloud as well, but you were telling me "No".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2011, 07:50 AM
 
10,753 posts, read 18,007,151 times
Reputation: 10244
Quote:
Originally Posted by le roi View Post
So you're saying I use my internet connection to upload into the cloud.

And then when I want to download from the cloud, to retrieve that data, I use..... what? magic? My understanding is that it was using an internet connection to download from the cloud as well, but you were telling me "No".
Re-read the post, "you no longer use your internet connection to host those items for you to see on your phone, or another computer".

Obviously if you access the data from your home using a PC or wi-fi device you will be using your bandwidth. "Phone" implies your using your carriers data plan, "another computer" implies one that's not at your location.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2011, 08:12 AM
 
22,779 posts, read 26,638,788 times
Reputation: 14580
Quote:
Originally Posted by NHDave View Post
Obviously if you access the data from your home using a PC or wi-fi device you will be using your bandwidth. "Phone" implies your using your carriers data plan, "another computer" implies one that's not at your location.
so you do use an internet connection to download from the cloud. i am glad you agree, i don't understand why this has to be made so complicated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Computers
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top