U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Computers
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-05-2011, 04:01 PM
 
2,182 posts, read 4,707,639 times
Reputation: 1206

Advertisements

k = kelvin

and yeah, no one overvolts their stuff, that has the potential to fry delicate parts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-05-2011, 04:24 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
22,370 posts, read 19,836,515 times
Reputation: 8825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jabronie View Post
I'm yet to run into one mobo that overvolts 'stock' since things moved past P III's lol. Err not to mention temps up 10k? WTF is 10k, temps are measure in Celsius typically. Sounds like a tool making **** up on an overclocking forum.
I read it on the amd boards. They were referring to the X6 1090T, which is almost the same as mine, so I think I might have to check that out as well.

K is Kelvin as temperature differences are measured in Kelvin, at least in the case of the Celsius unit, dunno about Fahrenheit. E.g. the difference between -10°C and +15°C is 25K.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2011, 04:59 PM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,977,317 times
Reputation: 12847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jabronie View Post
I'm yet to run into one mobo that overvolts 'stock' since things moved past P III's lol. Err not to mention temps up 10k? WTF is 10k, temps are measure in Celsius typically. Sounds like a tool making **** up on an overclocking forum.
Just because you are uneducated, doesn't make others a tool. Kelvin is a measurement of temperature used by scientists.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post

K is Kelvin as temperature differences are measured in Kelvin, at least in the case of the Celsius unit, dunno about Fahrenheit. E.g. the difference between -10°C and +15°C is 25K.
Kelvin is just another scale like Fahrenheit and Celsius. The conversion from C to K is simple.

C = K - 273.15

It has nothing to do with delta. That being said, a delta of 25K is the same as a delta of 25C.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2011, 05:03 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
22,370 posts, read 19,836,515 times
Reputation: 8825
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Kelvin is just another scale like Fahrenheit and Celsius. The conversion from C to K is simple.

C = K - 273.15

It has nothing to do with delta. That being said, a delta of 25K is the same as a delta of 25C.
When I went to school they taught us that Celsius differences are in K, maybe that has changed meanwhile
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2011, 05:06 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
22,370 posts, read 19,836,515 times
Reputation: 8825
Found this on Wiki:

Use in conjunction with Celsius
In science and in engineering, the Celsius scale and the kelvin are often used simultaneously in the same article (e.g., "...its measured value was 0.01028 °C with an uncertainty of 60 µK..."). This practice is permissible because the degree Celsius is a special name for the kelvin for use in expressing Celsius temperatures and the magnitude of the degree Celsius is exactly equal to that of the kelvin.[10] Notwithstanding that the official endorsement provided by Resolution 3 of the 13th CGPM states, "a temperature interval may also be expressed in degrees Celsius," the practice of simultaneously using both "°C" and "K" remains widespread throughout the scientific world as the use of SI prefixed forms of the degree Celsius (such as "µ°C" or "microdegrees Celsius") to express a temperature interval has not been widely adopted.

Kelvin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2011, 05:09 PM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,977,317 times
Reputation: 12847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
When I went to school they taught us that Celsius differences are in K, maybe that has changed meanwhile
I was fortunate enough to go to school after William Thomson's paper on absolute. 1840's I believe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2011, 05:32 PM
 
902 posts, read 957,733 times
Reputation: 1103
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Just because you are uneducated, doesn't make others a tool. Kelvin is a measurement of temperature used by scientists.



Kelvin is just another scale like Fahrenheit and Celsius. The conversion from C to K is simple.

C = K - 273.15

It has nothing to do with delta. That being said, a delta of 25K is the same as a delta of 25C.
Well I know of Kelvin, but TBH I've never seen it used in reference to temps on a home PC. I saw 10k and my mind instantly thought 10,000 ... as in OVER 9 THOUSAAAAAAAAND :P I made a bad assumption.

I'll also be the first to admit when it comes to AMD chips, I'm a bit of a newb - I should have prefaced my statement with all Intel chips since PIII's I'm yet to see one that runs higher volts with default bios settings.

I've had some CPUs overvolted and had no issues, mind you though I was on a phasechange cooler, Prometia Mach II, and my idle temps where neg40f, so heat was no issue :P (I had my last gen P4 clocked 24/7 @5ghz) I used it like that for over a year, ended up giving the rig to my brother back as a stock unit - he just tossed it last year. Long as temps are in tolerance (or better, the better) you have some room to play with volt wise, with in reason.

Other times, no matter how many extra volts fed to the cpu would allow for higher clocks, it's all such a crap shoot to get 'the one' lol. I wish I had the money to build a new icore rig, but the funds are just not there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2011, 05:45 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
22,370 posts, read 19,836,515 times
Reputation: 8825
One thing they said is that core temperature is often not correct with AMD chips as motherboards don't read the temp sensor within the chip, but somewhere outside and then estimate what it might be inside.

Above 61°C silicon starts to become unstable, similar to proteins above 41°C in living beings.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2011, 05:52 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
22,370 posts, read 19,836,515 times
Reputation: 8825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jabronie View Post
Well I know of Kelvin, but TBH I've never seen it used in reference to temps on a home PC. I saw 10k and my mind instantly thought 10,000 ... as in OVER 9 THOUSAAAAAAAAND :P I made a bad assumption.

I'll also be the first to admit when it comes to AMD chips, I'm a bit of a newb - I should have prefaced my statement with all Intel chips since PIII's I'm yet to see one that runs higher volts with default bios settings.

I've had some CPUs overvolted and had no issues, mind you though I was on a phasechange cooler, Prometia Mach II, and my idle temps where neg40f, so heat was no issue :P (I had my last gen P4 clocked 24/7 @5ghz) I used it like that for over a year, ended up giving the rig to my brother back as a stock unit - he just tossed it last year. Long as temps are in tolerance (or better, the better) you have some room to play with volt wise, with in reason.

Other times, no matter how many extra volts fed to the cpu would allow for higher clocks, it's all such a crap shoot to get 'the one' lol. I wish I had the money to build a new icore rig, but the funds are just not there.
Just for fun? I mean, when you already have a working PC, why build a new one?
I am happy when my computers last for a decade or so, modern processors are so powerful, I doubt I will ever need anything more powerful than the one I ordered now. Except for the music program I use the very same programs I used 5 to 10 years ago, in some cases not even new versions. For instance the ancient Winamp 2.9x, Word 2002, etc. They still work fine. Sometimes I feel that they bloat software just to offer more than the competition, even if nobody needs the new stuff.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2011, 06:10 PM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,977,317 times
Reputation: 12847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jabronie View Post

I'll also be the first to admit when it comes to AMD chips, I'm a bit of a newb
That explains it. You did realize this is an AMD thread, right?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Computers
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top