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Old 03-07-2012, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,849 posts, read 13,976,351 times
Reputation: 8083

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I have to be honest. I WANT to love it. I really really do.

So far, as has been said, I think it would make a great tablet. Keep in mind I have a big ass honking 23" TOUCH screen I am using here. Exactly what this should be for, right?

OMG I HATE IT.
For most of the day I set it up using Windows7 as it was shipped. Installed Metro.... err Windows 8. I seem to always want to call it Metro. It doesn't feel like Windows.
Now, it is still very early. I have only been using it a few hours. This is initial impressions.
I LOVE the Touchscreen Dell. It's pretty, it's fast, it's responsive.
Using each OS for about the same 3 - 4 hours.
But so far?? I totally prefer the Windows7 install on here.
Look at the screen shot. Like my MS Office 2003 shortcuts? OMG YUCK. Clicking on those *whoop* flips your screen to the "old desktop" style in an animation that just feels funky. Or will to the not so tech savvy. I didn't think I would mind the flipping back and forth between Metro and Desktop. I hate it.
Click on Outlook in Metro. *Whoop* to Desktop. Read some email Open one. Click jpg in attachment. *whoop* back to Metro. Close attachment. Stuck in Metro "Pictures" area. Right swoop > back to Outlook.

Oh, also: notice anything odd about the screenshot? Can't seem to figure that out. I would forgive that in a Developer Preview, but not a "Consumer Preview".

More later... going to see if I can make those Office shortcuts look like tiles...
Attached Thumbnails
Windows 8 Consumer Preview Released-imag0319.jpg   Windows 8 Consumer Preview Released-imag0320.jpg  

Last edited by Peregrine; 03-07-2012 at 09:31 AM..
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Old 03-07-2012, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Wandering.
3,546 posts, read 5,683,145 times
Reputation: 2664
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnyandcloudydays View Post
I would be curious to your thoughts in a work environment.

Sure the final version will be better than what is out there right now.

Just thinking aloud this new version is clumsy . even turning the machine off takes a few extra steps.

I am sure I can create a shortcut to do this but why ??? Here it is the year 2012 and I have to manually create a short cut to shutdown

Maybe it is me and i am just missing the obvious.

Case in hand here i am this morning on my laptop because my desktop would not connect to the net this morning.
There are some different things at play here that I think will lead to several different deployment types.

The first thing is that the apps that run in the Metro UI, aren't regular Win32 or .NET apps. They are either special HTML5/Javascript apps, or special .NET apps written against WinRT (more like Silverlight or Windows Phone apps). They don't have the same amount of power and capabilities that "legacy" apps do, and they have very little ability to talk to the desktop or other apps since they are pretty well sand-boxed. It's a very different development model from what most people are used to working with. This means that to stay in Metro completely, you'd have to have every app out there rewritten and that's just not going to happen.


For line of business apps and creative apps, things like Photoshop or video editing, Quickbooks or Visual Studio, and other true desktop apps you'll be going back to the desktop a lot. Hardcore games will also have to run on the desktop. I think that the average dedicated business machine will just get the Metro UI turned off, and have the old start menu back (There's a registry key for that).


Another factor is that when Windows 8 is installed on an ARM device (inexpensive tablets), "Lecacy" desktop apps won't run. What I've read is that only a handful of MS supplied apps will run on the Arm desktop. This means that you aren't really going to be getting an inexpensive ARM tablet and installing all of the apps that you have on the desktop. Those ARM based tablets are going to be Metro only tablets.

The more expensive tablets and slates (that run the X architecture) that will have full blown Windows, but of course they aren't as cheap, energy efficient, light, etc. so the average consumer is going to end up with a Metro tablet, and get used to the Metro interface on a pure tablet format.

Then you'll have the desktop home users. These people fall into two categories, power users and normal users.

The Power Users: Their personal machine has tons of software on it, they know every keyboard shortcut, tweak their apps and OS, etc, etc. They have tons of games on Steam, Origin, etc, and have development tools, business apps, and graphics and video editors installed, they run multiple monitors and dual or triple boot, and on and on.

These folks will probably turn off the Metro UI completely on the desktop and keep going as they have been. They may buy a tablet, but it will more likely be the X based one where they can run "Real" Windows, and they'll run mixed Metro and legacy desktop apps.

The average users: They buy computers so that they can start a browser to do their banking, do Facebook things, check email, watch videos, etc. They live in the browser. Yea, they may have some small desktop games, they listen to some music, maybe they run the Kindle app, or Skype, but for the most part the browser is the computer. They also have iSomethings or Android phones and are very comfortable with the concept of apps that connect them to their browser based worlds.

These people make up the majority of the user base that's moving away from PC's (Windows and other OSs) and these are the users that will eat the Metro experience up. They are the ones that will buy the Metro based tablets, and the ones that still have a desktop or laptop will find that once they adjust to the new UI and the new way of doing things, that the Metro paradigm makes more sense to them, since they are used to it anyway.
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Old 03-07-2012, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Whittier
3,007 posts, read 5,207,900 times
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I haven't had time to check it out (I did check out the beta though).

And a few months ago when I first saw Windows 8 I knew it had to be paired with a high quality trackpad on a desktop to function the way it was supposed to. Otherwise it should be relegated to tablets. Good tablets and touchpads and phone UI have really marred the "mouse" experience for me.

I can see W8 being pretty awesome for a kiosk setup, or just a way to eliminate desktop clutter, but EVERYTHING has to be integrated in order to provide a fluid and cohesive experience. Unless you lock it down.

Like someone else mentioned if you're (like most people) just using the internet, maybe some word processing, and a few apps/games, then I can't see W8 not catching on.
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Old 03-07-2012, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,849 posts, read 13,976,351 times
Reputation: 8083
Fixed the Chinese Characters.

About this issue:

"even turning the machine off takes a few extra steps."

While I totally agree that it is super clunky to do it in Windows.
(I mean come on Microsoft... why is POWER OFF listed under SETTINGS??? I swear the designers at MS can be so clueless sometimes).

WHat I do not get is why people are SO damn afraid to use the Power Button to shut the laptop/computer off. I get it if it is way back under a desk, but so many folks are AFRAID to do it. Since Windows XP there is an option in the Control Panel: THIS IS WHAT I WANT TO HAPPEN WHEN I PRESS POWER.
Default is SLEEP, but you can set it to POWER OFF.
Everyone is so afraid "you can't do that!!!!!"
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Wandering.
3,546 posts, read 5,683,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
Fixed the Chinese Characters.

About this issue:

"even turning the machine off takes a few extra steps."

While I totally agree that it is super clunky to do it in Windows.
(I mean come on Microsoft... why is POWER OFF listed under SETTINGS??? I swear the designers at MS can be so clueless sometimes).

WHat I do not get is why people are SO damn afraid to use the Power Button to shut the laptop/computer off. I get it if it is way back under a desk, but so many folks are AFRAID to do it. Since Windows XP there is an option in the Control Panel: THIS IS WHAT I WANT TO HAPPEN WHEN I PRESS POWER.
Default is SLEEP, but you can set it to POWER OFF.
Everyone is so afraid "you can't do that!!!!!"
I thought the same thing about the fact that it was under settings, like they couldn't figure out where to put it, so they just stuck it there.

I have a sleep button on the keyboards on all of my towers, and use that when I'm done for the day. My laptop has a hibernate key right on the keyboard as well, and of course you can usually reconfigure what happens when the lid closes on laptops.

The only reason that I noticed the power down in Win8 was that I'm running it in a VM so have to use the built in shutdown command.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:22 AM
 
1,444 posts, read 2,573,389 times
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Installed it in a virtual machine today and played around for a bit. I'll say I don't hate it as vehemently as most do, but I'm not a fan either.

The switching between the new UI and Win7 interface does not bother me. I'm sure with some time spent pinning stuff to the taskbar and creating shortcuts, I could avoid the new start menu for the most part.

I haven't found a way to collapse stuff in the start menu. Install a program that creates multiple icons (say an icon for the program, uninstall, and 1 or 2 others, those all show up. No way to collapse them. This will make the new UI very cluttered in time.

No buttons in the traditional win7 view. You have to put the mouse in the general area and wait for the menu to popup. If there's other icons in the area (say on the bottom right of the taksbar) goodluck finding the sweet spot.

I do like the new task manager.

In the end, microsoft needs to decide if they want this to be a tablet OS or a desktop OS. Trying to make it a hybrid just isn't going to work. Your average user might get by with this, but power users will not. They need to let the user decide which interface they want to use.

If microsoft wants a tablet like interface, they'd probably be better off following something gnome 3 for linux. Thats at least more usuable.

I say lets forget this pretty interfaces and all go back to the command line.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:55 PM
 
11,715 posts, read 36,348,910 times
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I don't know why they don't just put their phone OS on tablets and leave the real Windows for real computers. They could have done that a year ago.
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Old 03-07-2012, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,849 posts, read 13,976,351 times
Reputation: 8083
OK it's growing on me. Scratch that, I mean, as I make it more and more useless I just don't hate it as much.

Brill, you can remove those extra programs by right clicking them and then choosing UNPIN. It hides them under the ALL APPS area.
Which is pretty much what I have done with all the Metro apps making this pretty useless overall.
Agree with Brill, the new Task Manger rocks. I also like the new COPY dialog box that actually has a bar that fills up. Things that have nothing to do with Metro.

As I get into configuring this more for my receptionist I find more and more stuff that doesn't work or we just don't need.
The Metro email app doesn't work well with Corporate Exchange. I fact I can't get it to work at all. So that removes my ability to use Mail, Calendar or People. Remove all those. Don't need any of these apps for reception: Finance, Music, Videos, Pictures. Removed all that.
Only left IE 10 (which is good) and Maps and Desktop. That is all.
The MS Surface apps are fun to show off what this can do but no real need for them. They aren't Metro Ready either.
So here is close to what it will look like if I roll it out.
Shortcut to programs. 2 or 3 Metro apps. And shortcuts to networks shares called: Home, Corporate & Litigation. So basically it is just a pretty launcher that takes you to Desktop if you need to do any type of, y'know: work.
Attached Thumbnails
Windows 8 Consumer Preview Released-imag0324.jpg  
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Old 03-07-2012, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,849 posts, read 13,976,351 times
Reputation: 8083
I can see MS's strategy though. They are trying to dominate Tablets, Phones and PC by tying it all together. If they lose 20% of the market, so what. They own 85, so they probably think they will make that back in 5 years when people start buying MS phones, tablets and PC's.
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Old 03-07-2012, 02:24 PM
 
1,444 posts, read 2,573,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post

So basically it is just a pretty launcher that takes you to Desktop if you need to do any type of, y'know: work.
I just see it as a revamped start menu with more clutter that needs to be removed.

I think your weather app isn't working correctly in that screen shot, it's never sunny in cleveland.



Thinking larger picture, how will all this metro stuff play with current group policy settings?
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