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Old 03-16-2012, 08:26 PM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,982,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Konraden View Post
I don't have a touch-screen, so I have no idea. What hardware are you using? You might be better served by asking your host's developer. I use Oracle's VirtualBox.

But really, it takes only a few minutes to install Win8 on VirtualBox anyway, so you can always try it out.
ThinkPad x220 w/ multitouch screen

I typically use VMWare, but I've never used a gui interface on it.
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Old 03-18-2012, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL SouthWest Suburbs
3,528 posts, read 5,238,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
I don't think that's true. Someone looking to replace a computer that they use a lot is not suddenly going to stop doing things they did before because the interface has changed. Everything is still there: it's just been Metroified...

It was metrofied and without 8 running on a tablet
you have to make short cuts or do extra steps to get the same job done.

to me that is going backwards in a technology advanced world.
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Old 03-18-2012, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL SouthWest Suburbs
3,528 posts, read 5,238,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHTransplant View Post
I installed the Windows 8 preview last weekend on my Dell laptop. Had tried it earlier but the install failed. After a few days I tried again and had success.

Unlike my initial experience with Windows 7, I'm underwhelmed. I just don't see anything that's better, slicker, or easier. It's just clunkier and harder to navigate around. Some of my PC features don't work (e.g., fingerprint reader). My network multi-function printer disappeared - and reinstalling it turned out to be a huge pain in the rear, and it's still not at 100% functionality.

I don't care for the Metro interface and apps. First, it assumes you use a lot of Microsoft services. Second, on a shared PC each user would have to keep logging in and out - something we don't do for what is a shared family laptop that is always running and everyone grabs when needed.

Utlimately, for me and my uses this just seems like a hobbled version of Windows 7.
You nailed it, Assuming you use alot of microsoft services.
I got the same impression.

Kind of like my android and using google services.
However with the android I have already used picasa and gmail and calendar for 3 years so everything came together flawlessly.

it appears microsoft is piggy backing off android and apple with this big experiement.

I do not see why they cant just leave it alone
7 is fine for most causal users and laptop , desktop users.

Really if I had a touch pad I would probably not mind 8.

Just like alot of people here it is simply not designed to function in a work environment.

I think when it is all said and done microsoft will have a tablet and will have a desktop/work package.
I dont see how 8 will be a savior .

When the microsoft team did a video of 8 i had to laugh becaue they recreated the start icon on the screen what does that tell you.
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Old 03-18-2012, 12:22 PM
 
11,715 posts, read 36,348,910 times
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I have the consumer preview running in a VM. The whole thing has split personality disorder. For example, Windows can now open PDF's. So you're in Explorer, you double click a PDF, and suddenly you're in a full screen Metro app (reader) viewing your PDF. Wait, where's my Explorer window? How do I close this thing? Most people will probably wind up hitting Start and clicking desktop again. The best I've found is either Alt-Tab or Win+Tab to get back to the desktop. Still a lot more jarring and tedious than just clicking an X to close a window.
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Old 03-18-2012, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL SouthWest Suburbs
3,528 posts, read 5,238,598 times
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There you go why should you or anyone in the year 2012 me hitting alt tab, **** tab. xtytab ..... you get the message.

WHY

They are going backwards with this wizardry
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Old 03-18-2012, 04:16 PM
 
3,614 posts, read 3,092,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EscapeCalifornia View Post
I have the consumer preview running in a VM. The whole thing has split personality disorder. For example, Windows can now open PDF's. So you're in Explorer, you double click a PDF, and suddenly you're in a full screen Metro app (reader) viewing your PDF. Wait, where's my Explorer window? How do I close this thing? Most people will probably wind up hitting Start and clicking desktop again. The best I've found is either Alt-Tab or Win+Tab to get back to the desktop. Still a lot more jarring and tedious than just clicking an X to close a window.
I already know and use a tremendous number of keyboard shortcuts that the average population doesn't know, so it isn't terrible difficult for me to get around--but I'm looking at this with my mother's glasses on, thinking what the ****.

Seriously, whose going to have a dozen apps open and running all the time on their computer? There is just no practical way to manage your running apps, like a simple "close" and "minimize" button. I was enjoying a chat with a linux guru a few months back, and he was explaining how Windows is revolutionary, where as linux was evolutionary. Everything you worked with in Linux would apply to the next version, and the next version, and the next version--etc. Windows reinvented the wheel every-time a new OS came out. I think Windows 8 is pretty solid example of that, but how many people can honestly say that the interface from Windows 95 and Windows 7 are all that difference? You have added features and some slipstreaming, but for the most part, you can click start, find your program, run it in a window, manipulate that window, etc. Windows hasn't changed really in fifteen years.

It's going to be interesting once Win8 starts coming to fruitation.
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Old 03-18-2012, 04:29 PM
 
11,715 posts, read 36,348,910 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Konraden View Post
I already know and use a tremendous number of keyboard shortcuts that the average population doesn't know, so it isn't terrible difficult for me to get around--but I'm looking at this with my mother's glasses on, thinking what the ****.
It actually looks like Microsoft has expanded the number of Win+letter key combos in Win8 while making it that much more tedious to navigate solely with a mouse. I'm actually thinking of getting some cards printed up with all these shortcuts on them.

While memorized shortcut keys are great for power users, ( use them a lot, I agree that they're the wrong direction for a consumer OS that's supposed to be easy to use. The nice thing about traditional menus is that things are discoverable. You can mouse your way through an unfamiliar program's menus and get a feel for how to operate it just by reading the menus, but without actually committing to any actions.

Touch screens, with their reliance on symbols instead of words, and shortcut keys are the opposite. Without a manual, the only way to find out what something does is it hit it and find out. Most people, especially people like your mother, will be too afraid of breaking something to just start hitting things.

My mom has a digital picture frame that's a touch screen. You tap the screen to pause the slide show, then tap an icon to perform some action such as delete the current picture or change some options. Her eyes glaze over trying to figure out what the wordless icons are supposed to do, so she does nothing and asks me to take care of it the next time I'm over.

This reminds me of the old WordPerfect days where people had cheat sheets on their keyboard because only the most dedicated users could remember what Shift+Alt+F9 did.
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Old 03-18-2012, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Wandering.
3,546 posts, read 5,683,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Konraden View Post
Seriously, whose going to have a dozen apps open and running all the time on their computer? There is just no practical way to manage your running apps, like a simple "close" and "minimize" button.
The reason that the Metro apps don't have a close button, is that they don't close. These aren't traditional apps, but are written via one of two methods; either HTML5 CSS and Javascript, or XAML and a lightweight version of .NET (these are closer to the Silverlight based apps on Windows Phone 7). They also don't interface directly with the Windows API or .NET framework, but with a new run time (WinRT).

Metro apps are far closer to a phone app than a traditional application.
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Old 03-19-2012, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,849 posts, read 13,976,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EscapeCalifornia View Post
This reminds me of the old WordPerfect days where people had cheat sheets on their keyboard because only the most dedicated users could remember what Shift+Alt+F9 did.
O yea. That good old F-Key overlay.
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Old 03-21-2012, 08:36 AM
 
9,198 posts, read 22,172,275 times
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After running Windows 8 for more than a week on my Dell laptop, I've given up on the metro interface entirely. It seems like a toy - not a serious work environment. Fun to play around with a bit, but after the novelty wears off, there's just no real utility to it. It would perhaps be nice, for example if it linked to my (non-Microsoft) Outlook email. The so-called "live" tiles are really dead as I don't use any Microsoft services. The rest of the tiles (so-called apps) don't do anything that a quick internet bookmark wouldn't do (weather, movies, etc.)

I've created a startup link to open the traditional desktop and just skip the metro interface. (It doesn't really skip it - loading the desktop is the last item in the startup sequence, but since I don't sit and watch the startup it's like bypassing it.) I've also added Stardock's start button utility to return the missing Windows Start button (not quite the same function as in Windows 7, but it saves me having to hunt for my programs and settings.)

I'm probably stick with this a while to get more familiar with it, but I'm thinking I may go back to Windows 7.
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