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Old 03-06-2012, 06:49 PM
 
40,209 posts, read 41,799,403 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wartrace View Post
and 24 dollars for a "mail merge fee"

They are going to adress each letter to the recipient. For example if you have quickbooks, a database or even information in a simple table you can merge that information into multiple documents.

Word mail merge: A walk through the process - Word - Office.com

You only have to type out your original letter once and then use placeholders for the information that differs on each document such as the address. I used to send out 400 letters once a year to all my customers, the adress was printed right on the letter and I used paned envelopes, I only had to fold and stuff the envelopes.

You can do lot with this, for example I had different price tiers based on the distance I had to travel. Each customer was assigned to a tier so I could print out on the letter exactly what the price was for each individual customer.

As crazy as it may sound the best letter printer I ever had was a lexmark 1000 that I purchased in 97. I only needed to print about 1500 pages a year and that thing lasted for 5 or 6 years. They had a waterproof black ink cartridge for it that produced outstanding letter quality and lasted forever.
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Old 03-06-2012, 08:12 PM
 
11,715 posts, read 36,336,945 times
Reputation: 7514
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
And yet I've never had any. Including the one I just set up on my Windows Home Server 2011 using a 64 bit PCL5 universal print driver from HP. Oh, did I mention it's a Series 1200 laserjet connected using a print server?

No problem at all...
OK, now go grab a random HP network AIO from Staples. Connect it to the LAN and verify its connected by talking to it through your browser. Now install their software on 20 random PCs connected to that LAN. A percentage of them will fail to find the printer. Or find the printer, then fail to install. Or find the printer, then deny its existence. This crap happens all the time with HP and rarely with any other brand I've worked with.
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Old 03-06-2012, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,537 posts, read 55,453,855 times
Reputation: 32256
Quote:
Originally Posted by EscapeCalifornia View Post
OK, now go grab a random HP network AIO from Staples. Connect it to the LAN and verify its connected by talking to it through your browser. Now install their software on 20 random PCs connected to that LAN. A percentage of them will fail to find the printer. Or find the printer, then fail to install. Or find the printer, then deny its existence. This crap happens all the time with HP and rarely with any other brand I've worked with.
My past problems with HP printers were different. The drivers were WAY too aggressive and interrupted and crashed anything else that tried to access a port. (Some POS systems use pass-through taps for cash drawers or pole displays.) HP drivers would snag them and toss 'em into the dirt every time. It got to a point I told customers that I wouldn't support systems that had HP stuff. Too bad, I remember the original HP inkjets were little jewels for the time. Well behaved, good ink capacity, and quite robust.
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Old 03-06-2012, 11:16 PM
 
11,715 posts, read 36,336,945 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
My past problems with HP printers were different. The drivers were WAY too aggressive and interrupted and crashed anything else that tried to access a port. (Some POS systems use pass-through taps for cash drawers or pole displays.) HP drivers would snag them and toss 'em into the dirt every time. It got to a point I told customers that I wouldn't support systems that had HP stuff. Too bad, I remember the original HP inkjets were little jewels for the time. Well behaved, good ink capacity, and quite robust.
That reminds me that I've seen a few HP drivers that take it upon themselves to always make their printer the system default. Really, HP? I've honestly not had much trouble with the hardware but the terrible software is a deal killer for me. HP also tends to abandon printers pretty quickly and throws up a half-assed "universal" driver on the web site.
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Old 03-07-2012, 01:17 AM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,723 posts, read 29,314,884 times
Reputation: 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
And yet I've never had any. Including the one I just set up on my Windows Home Server 2011 using a 64 bit PCL5 universal print driver from HP. Oh, did I mention it's a Series 1200 laserjet connected using a print server?

No problem at all...
I have had several HP printers, ink jets and now a very cheap laser printer (1102w for $99.00 at Amazon), and haven't had a single problem with it. I bought this little printer mainly for my wife to print documents from her iPad, but it works very well as a network printer. I have no idea how difficult to set this printer with a PC; it's very easy with a Mac.

What I usually do to set network printers is to connect it to a computer via USB or ethernet to set it. Once it's recognized by the network, I disconnect it from the computer and use it wirelessly to print from any of the computers. Now what is a little difficult is following the instructions on the manual, so I usually ignore that and take care of it as I have learned through the years
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Old 03-07-2012, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Wartrace,TN
5,819 posts, read 9,211,044 times
Reputation: 11585
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
They are going to adress each letter to the recipient. For example if you have quickbooks, a database or even information in a simple table you can merge that information into multiple documents.

Word mail merge: A walk through the process - Word - Office.com

You only have to type out your original letter once and then use placeholders for the information that differs on each document such as the address. I used to send out 400 letters once a year to all my customers, the adress was printed right on the letter and I used paned envelopes, I only had to fold and stuff the envelopes.

You can do lot with this, for example I had different price tiers based on the distance I had to travel. Each customer was assigned to a tier so I could print out on the letter exactly what the price was for each individual customer.

As crazy as it may sound the best letter printer I ever had was a lexmark 1000 that I purchased in 97. I only needed to print about 1500 pages a year and that thing lasted for 5 or 6 years. They had a waterproof black ink cartridge for it that produced outstanding letter quality and lasted forever.
I have a mail merge list all set up and can create the individual letters. I am just curious what the 24 dollar "mail merge charge" that this printer was asking for. I told her I had the letters I wanted to be printed from my mail merge file- maybe she thought I wanted HER to create the mail merged file. Still, at 24 dollars that seems steep since all she has to do is walk through the "Wizard" which takes all of a minute......
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Old 03-07-2012, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Wartrace,TN
5,819 posts, read 9,211,044 times
Reputation: 11585
I guess I am going to try it again with another printer. I think it is probably best to buy at a retail store for two reasons. 1) It is likely the product will have not suffered as rough handling as one that is shipped via UPS. 2) Returns would be easier if it is "screwed up".

I think my experience with the Samsung was probably due to the rough handling. When I first opened the toner area I could see toner had escaped the cartridges.

Although I might have been able to "fix" the problem with the black lines it just didn't seem right to have ordered a brand new printer that didn't produce right out of the box. In my opinion I shouldn't have to "clean" or "fix" anything on a brand new product.
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Old 03-07-2012, 01:40 PM
 
Location: WV and Eastport, ME
11,714 posts, read 11,305,024 times
Reputation: 7698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
And yet I've never had any. Including the one I just set up on my Windows Home Server 2011 using a 64 bit PCL5 universal print driver from HP. Oh, did I mention it's a Series 1200 laserjet connected using a print server?

No problem at all...
I've had no trouble with my 1200 (bought in 2002) either.Not so with later HP lasers. Back around 2000, a LJ 4100 was great and many are still in use. We've already trashed most of the 4200 and 4300 printers. Now, we buy Lexmark.
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Old 03-07-2012, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Diaspora
21,540 posts, read 24,674,751 times
Reputation: 8930
Quote:
The Samsung I bought was from Amazon and I suspect that the handling of the package through UPS might have been a factor in its printing problems.
It wasn't Amazon, it was the printer.

Due to the way the economy is now, most manufacturers are building them towards a price point that will move in this market rather than a quality point. If you want quality you will need to dig into the deep specs looking for certain highlights that would tend to make built for business use rather than home use. For example in #10 it lists the 3070. This is a low end consumer model that uses a TN210 cartridge. Problem with it is that it will run out of at least 1 cartridge by the time you hit the second ream of paper and the cartridge price is around $75 each. Its not a bad printer, just expensive to use. What you need to find is a printer that has a bypass tray that allows for thicker paper and has a better duty cycle which usually means better parts. My current printer is a Brother that uses 5000 page cartridges and has a duty cycle of 20000. I use and reccomend Brothers on a few main points good durability and each time Windows changed OS versions they have always had working drivers available before the new OS came to market. So look for the ones that currently use the TN310/315 cartridges (MFC-9XXX,HL-4XXX). These cartidges will cost more than TN210's but you will get nearly 4x the ink. If you don't mind using generic cartridges then go to EBay and purchase replacements from Duraeco.com.
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Old 03-07-2012, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Wartrace,TN
5,819 posts, read 9,211,044 times
Reputation: 11585
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
It wasn't Amazon, it was the printer.

Due to the way the economy is now, most manufacturers are building them towards a price point that will move in this market rather than a quality point. If you want quality you will need to dig into the deep specs looking for certain highlights that would tend to make built for business use rather than home use. For example in #10 it lists the 3070. This is a low end consumer model that uses a TN210 cartridge. Problem with it is that it will run out of at least 1 cartridge by the time you hit the second ream of paper and the cartridge price is around $75 each. Its not a bad printer, just expensive to use. What you need to find is a printer that has a bypass tray that allows for thicker paper and has a better duty cycle which usually means better parts. My current printer is a Brother that uses 5000 page cartridges and has a duty cycle of 20000. I use and reccomend Brothers on a few main points good durability and each time Windows changed OS versions they have always had working drivers available before the new OS came to market. So look for the ones that currently use the TN310/315 cartridges (MFC-9XXX,HL-4XXX). These cartidges will cost more than TN210's but you will get nearly 4x the ink. If you don't mind using generic cartridges then go to EBay and purchase replacements from Duraeco.com.
I wasn't blaming Amazon as much as the suspected "rough handling" in transit. When I opened the toner area it looked like there was toner that had "escaped" from the cartridges.

I appreciate the suggestion though to look at a more "robust" models- I am going to do some research....
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