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Old 04-04-2012, 05:08 PM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,264,005 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurcoLoco View Post
If your logic is suggesting thermal cycling is bad, then the heat that gradually builds on while the device on couldn't be that good for it either.
While excessive heat is bad for electronics, that it the temp it is designed to operate at, it is the thermal cycling cold/hot/cold/hot, etc that kills it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TurcoLoco View Post
I have been power cycling each and every modem I had on a daily basis.
And when it fails, it will be when you apply power.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TurcoLoco View Post
Power cycling is bad for the electronics, yes, may be, if the power/current is crappy at that location.
Zero to line voltage is as extreme as it gets aside from surges/spikes, but who the hell has anything not protected by surge or UPS in the first place.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TurcoLoco View Post
What kills the unprotected device is the unregulated voltage that comes from the receptacle not because the device was "cold" and then it was turned on. I have seen just as many light bulbs die when they were already on.
First this is not about the hazards face by anything connected to the power grid, but the practice of turning devices off and on that are not designed to be turned off/on. Surges/spikes are an issue, you of course have surge protection at a minimum on your computers, and any TV home theater worth more than a $20 surge protector


Quote:
Originally Posted by TurcoLoco View Post
I have also seen people plug their hair dryer or printers to the same surge protector that their PC was connected to, I was like "Really?".
So? There are also complete idiots that look down the barrel of a gun to see if it is loaded.... DUH
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Old 04-04-2012, 06:33 PM
 
Location: 10110001010110100
6,385 posts, read 10,843,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asheville Native View Post
While excessive heat is bad for electronics, that it the temp it is designed to operate at, it is the thermal cycling cold/hot/cold/hot, etc that kills it.
You are talking as if you know each an every environment a modem is typically used at, the ambiance temperature and also the possibly heat/cold producing sources around the device, etc.
Too many variables to blame just the power cycling as the only device killer. If a device is designed to handle that presumed "operating" temperature, then on the same token, it is designed to handle the voltage that comes to it especially when every single modem I have seen comes with an DC adapter, so to say AC voltage kills it is plain silly.

Quote:
And when it fails, it will be when you apply power.
And I am saying, considering my experience with it thus far, before that actually happens, I might be dead or the technology changes might require me to get another one anyhow.

Quote:
Zero to line voltage is as extreme as it gets aside from surges/spikes, but who the hell has anything not protected by surge or UPS in the first place.
You will be surprised. Perhaps we should run a survey about it on this forum?


Quote:
So? There are also complete idiots that look down the barrel of a gun to see if it is loaded.... DUH
I didn't get what you mean by that so no comment.
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Old 04-04-2012, 07:24 PM
 
833 posts, read 968,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
When the modem and router stop working, before you go and buy a new one do the following: turn both the modem and router off for about a minute. Then plug-in the modem first and wait around a minute of more. Now plug the router and let it come online as usual.

Step by step instructions (how to reset a network):
How to Reset Your Home Network: 10 steps - wikiHow

By the way, I do turn the computers off, but not the modem and router.
Thats exactly what I was doing. I called support during modem one, and they told me to do exactly that. It works, and it worked many previous times with the other modems. This last time, after 2 hours or so, it would work for a minute or two, then it went bad. At that point I decided to buy a new modem. It works fine now.
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Old 04-04-2012, 07:26 PM
 
833 posts, read 968,178 times
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Amazing information all. I am better informed now and will definatley try your suggestions. Thanks everyone!
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Old 04-04-2012, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,723 posts, read 29,314,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RCLL View Post
Thats exactly what I was doing. I called support during modem one, and they told me to do exactly that. It works, and it worked many previous times with the other modems. This last time, after 2 hours or so, it would work for a minute or two, then it went bad. At that point I decided to buy a new modem. It works fine now.
Glad to hear that you solved that problem.

I forgot to mention something else: sometimes upgrading the router's (or modem/router) firmware helps, too. But before doing so, you have to save the settings to use them later, since the firmware upgrade wipes everything on the router.
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Old 04-05-2012, 10:30 AM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,264,005 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
Glad to hear that you solved that problem.

I forgot to mention something else: sometimes upgrading the router's (or modem/router) firmware helps, too. But before doing so, you have to save the settings to use them later, since the firmware upgrade wipes everything on the router.
Typically NO, firmware upgrades does not wipe settings, even when new features are added such as the recent change LinkSys made to allow WPS to be disabled.

Having a backup of setting is a good idea though.
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Houston
471 posts, read 1,375,248 times
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Speaking of better-than-average surge protectors, I'll be buying this Tripp Lite power bar for my HT system. Not the BEST out there (not junk though, with its metal construction), but I simply cannot afford one of those. And anyway, as several electricians have told me, if you are at home & a lightning storm approaches, the best protection is to simply unplug the equipment.

And IMO unplugging is also the best protection against a direct lightning strike, because using just the bar's power switch won't provide 100% protection because a major power surge can literally jump across the gap between the metal contacts in the switch. I've seen something similar on a buddy's stereo system back in the 90s when their home experienced a direct lightning strike which traveled through his home's wiring system: on the back of the receiver, between the two accessory outlets on the rear panel, were carbonised tracks in the paint between the slots in the outlets. The current literally forced its way through non-conducting material! (and yes, the receiver was completely non-functional).

As far as turn-on surges, I have no proof of this but I wonder if more quality-minded manufacturers include "soft turn on" systems in their products, systems which prevent harmful power-switch surges.
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:14 PM
 
Location: 10110001010110100
6,385 posts, read 10,843,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lije Baley View Post
Speaking of better-than-average surge protectors, I'll be buying this Tripp Lite power bar for my HT system. Not the BEST out there (not junk though, with its metal construction), but I simply cannot afford one of those. And anyway, as several electricians have told me, if you are at home & a lightning storm approaches, the best protection is to simply unplug the equipment.

And IMO unplugging is also the best protection against a direct lightning strike, because using just the bar's power switch won't provide 100% protection because a major power surge can literally jump across the gap between the metal contacts in the switch. I've seen something similar on a buddy's stereo system back in the 90s when their home experienced a direct lightning strike which traveled through his home's wiring system: on the back of the receiver, between the two accessory outlets on the rear panel, were carbonised tracks in the paint between the slots in the outlets. The current literally forced its way through non-conducting material! (and yes, the receiver was completely non-functional).

As far as turn-on surges, I have no proof of this but I wonder if more quality-minded manufacturers include "soft turn on" systems in their products, systems which prevent harmful power-switch surges.
I cannot remember the brand of mine but it was around $30 (on sale) and it is the kind that goes under the monitor. Flat design and has the connectors in the back, it also provides RJ-45/RJ-11 connectors to filter those lines too which could damage your modem just as easily due to their direct connection.
As I mentioned in my previous post, if a modem/router is using an adapter, it also regulates the current as it transforms AC current to DC, so if a spike hits bad enough, it is likely to take the adapter out before it can do anything to the device.

In case of a thunderstorm/lightning season, you were told right, you should disconnect every electric connection from the wall and keep the connectors at least a few feet away as the incredibly high lightning induced voltage can jump from the receptacle to a near by (disconnected) power cable.

No surge protector/UPS will ever protect against a lightening voltage.

Last edited by TurcoLoco; 04-05-2012 at 01:03 PM..
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Old 04-05-2012, 03:01 PM
 
Location: WV and Eastport, ME
11,714 posts, read 11,305,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurcoLoco View Post
I cannot remember the brand of mine but it was around $30 (on sale) and it is the kind that goes under the monitor. Flat design and has the connectors in the back, it also provides RJ-45/RJ-11 connectors to filter those lines too which could damage your modem just as easily due to their direct connection.
As I mentioned in my previous post, if a modem/router is using an adapter, it also regulates the current as it transforms AC current to DC, so if a spike hits bad enough, it is likely to take the adapter out before it can do anything to the device.

In case of a thunderstorm/lightning season, you were told right, you should disconnect every electric connection from the wall and keep the connectors at least a few feet away as the incredibly high lightning induced voltage can jump from the receptacle to a near by (disconnected) power cable.

No surge protector/UPS will ever protect against a lightening voltage.
I use TrippLite Isobar surge protectors. joule rating is about as good as it gets.

BTW, can anybody explain how a power surge is going to get to my Cat 5 cabling? Putting RJ-45 connectors on a surge protector looks like a sales opportunity about as useful as SNL's Robot Insurance.


A long time ago, my friend had me help him replace plugs on surge protectors that had been given to him. The cord had a loose loop tied into it. When the lightning hit, it blew the cord in two instead of frying the surge protector.

Last edited by mensaguy; 04-05-2012 at 03:04 PM.. Reason: robots
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Old 04-05-2012, 10:29 PM
 
Location: 10110001010110100
6,385 posts, read 10,843,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mensaguy View Post
I use TrippLite Isobar surge protectors. joule rating is about as good as it gets.

BTW, can anybody explain how a power surge is going to get to my Cat 5 cabling? Putting RJ-45 connectors on a surge protector looks like a sales opportunity about as useful as SNL's Robot Insurance.


A long time ago, my friend had me help him replace plugs on surge protectors that had been given to him. The cord had a loose loop tied into it. When the lightning hit, it blew the cord in two instead of frying the surge protector.
I think mine is called something like GhettoLite Isobar!
Mensa, don't ask me about this kinda stuff, for all I know, the whole "surge protection" is bologna! I mean, if it actually tripped, blew a fuse or sent me an e-mail informing that it actually caught a spike in the current then I would probably start believing that these device are actually doing something!

Ethernet/phone cable could very well be a marketing gimmick and it probably is. I personally never used them but I don't tell people not to, better safe than sorry and if it comes with one, might as well use it.
I mean the whole "joule rating" could be BS too. It is not like the surge protectors come with a joule gauge that we can check, right?
Is the 2% milk I am drinking really has only 2% fat in it? Did the aliens really build the pyramids in Egypt?

I need another drink...
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