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Old 06-20-2013, 08:30 AM
 
40,212 posts, read 41,808,108 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
When I go to ESPN, I immediately get the blaring audio of the portal video. The only way I can turn it off is to get a login name and password at ESPN, which enables me to acess their tools and defeat that annoyance. What the hell do I care if somebody guesses my "secure" password at ESPN?
I have a mute button on my keyboard, I usually leave it on mute.
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Old 06-21-2013, 10:40 AM
 
13,072 posts, read 11,577,126 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KC_Sleuth View Post
I work in an office setting where we have to log into several software applications in addition to various accounts to internet based databases. Additionally, there are network and hardware passwords (Windows, VPN tunnel, etc.).

Is there a particular reason why password security seems to be so non-uniform among all of these applications - so you can't create one password and use it for all systems/applications. Each has its own requirement - whether it be special characters, upper/lower case characters, number/character combinations, etc. I have literally seen people who have a paper list of passwords taped to their desks because there is no way that they could possibly remember all of the passwords they need to use on a daily basis. Who can remember that one application requires a password like P283!$horty131 and another requires P283Shorty131, and they have to be changed every three months.

There is a breaking point where too much password security actually creates a hazard because people will defeat the purpose of said security measures (by writing them down, or storing them online in a less then secure location, or by taping post-it notes to their monitors with various passwords on them, etc.).

Today I had to log into a personal account and had forgotten the ridiculous password that the site required, and so I was presented with 5 security questions I answered 2 years ago (and for which I did not know the correct answers because they were case sensitive, etc.). It seems like we have taken password security to absurd levels. Sorry just needed to vent.
Very much needed, but there is an easy solution.

Look up some techniques online. There are some tricks that teach you how to make extremely complex passwords that you can very easily remember.

An example of approach is 3 sections of associate passwords (acronyms, dates, etc), segregated by a sequence of shift keys (123 = !@#).

HSRP!1950@itil#

First is an acronym of "Hot Standby Routing Protocol"
Second is a date.
Third is an acronym of :"Information Technology Infrastructure Library"

Next next character is a sequence of !@# placed in between the next two

So, in your head, associated those with the shift keys, the sequence is really just...

Hot Standby Routing Protocol-- shift 1--1950--shift 2--Information Technology Infrastructure Library--shift 3.

Very easy to remember when you approach it this way, and the boon is that you can use the base and change out one of the 3 word sections to change between passwords.

You could even use one of the acronyms (or even a word) as an association to the relevance of the specific passwords use.

For instance

HSRP!1950@vpnconn#

HSRP!1950@dskcomp#

etc...

This should make having multiple complex passwords easy to remember.

Also, if you have to change every 3 months, just change one of the two associations in the beginning consistently across all your passes. So for instance, HSRP, change to VRRP. Now all Passes begin with VRRP and that is the only thing you have to remember aside from your original pass.

Add in the fact that most password reuse restrictions will be around a 6 month to 1 year cycle and you can cycle through them as well. The beauty of it is that you will have an easy system to remember and associate passwords to which are likely much stronger than anyone else is using.

Last edited by Nomander; 06-21-2013 at 10:51 AM..
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