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Old 06-18-2013, 07:55 PM
 
65 posts, read 64,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
I have an external hard drive--assuming the hard drive is ok, I should be able to use that to extract information, correct? I'm not sure what all is going on with the computer, the computer is not here. I just know that it won't boot up fully.
It's all in the details. We really can't give you an accurate answer without knowing what is going on with the computer. It would be good if you could tell us how far in the boot process the computer gets. Does your dad see the initial "Microsoft Windows" startup screen? (Assuming he's using Windows).
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Old 06-20-2013, 06:28 PM
 
20,793 posts, read 54,650,996 times
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Originally Posted by JessicaMyerson View Post
It's all in the details. We really can't give you an accurate answer without knowing what is going on with the computer. It would be good if you could tell us how far in the boot process the computer gets. Does your dad see the initial "Microsoft Windows" startup screen? (Assuming he's using Windows).
It's a Dell with Windows. Not sure how far it boots up. Unfortunately my Dad passed away last month, which is why we need to try to get this off his computer. I will be going down to visit my mom in a week or two and was going to try to help her get access to the information. She needs to see if she can get some passwords and whatnot for some accounts, turn off some of his social networking things, Facebook, blogs, etc. Just one of those things she didn't consider to get before.
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Old 06-20-2013, 11:38 PM
 
15,924 posts, read 17,656,019 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
It's a Dell with Windows. Not sure how far it boots up. Unfortunately my Dad passed away last month, which is why we need to try to get this off his computer. I will be going down to visit my mom in a week or two and was going to try to help her get access to the information. She needs to see if she can get some passwords and whatnot for some accounts, turn off some of his social networking things, Facebook, blogs, etc. Just one of those things she didn't consider to get before.
If the system will not boot normally attempt to boot the system in Safe Mode....

Start your computer in safe mode

Keep us informed....
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Old 06-24-2013, 12:36 AM
 
137 posts, read 118,651 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JessicaMyerson View Post
I work with a lot of technical people. I've seen the term "memory" thrown around for all sorts of addressable and non-addressable storage mediums (including hard drives). Most often when they're talking to other technical folks. I'd be surprised if a computer engineer or computer scientist didn't use the term to refer to a hard drive at some point. It's computer architecture 101.

Computer users (everyone from end users to computer enthusiasts to support staff) typically restrict the term "memory" to volatile memory used for temporary storage.
This. Logically, all memory (RAM, hard drives, SSDs, etc) work the same. That's why when you load data into registers, you use the same MEM command. No matter where the data comes from. The only difference is which controller you reference by address and the address location (the OS translates the addresses to virtual blocks to overcome addressing limitations for large storage devices). To the computer, it's all memory. Anyone who's flipped through a computer arch book will have come across the term "memory" being used for hard drive and disk storage.
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Old 06-24-2013, 01:04 AM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,979,772 times
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Originally Posted by Tenured View Post
This. Logically, all memory (RAM, hard drives, SSDs, etc) work the same. That's why when you load data into registers, you use the same MEM command. No matter where the data comes from. The only difference is which controller you reference by address and the address location (the OS translates the addresses to virtual blocks to overcome addressing limitations for large storage devices). To the computer, it's all memory. Anyone who's flipped through a computer arch book will have come across the term "memory" being used for hard drive and disk storage.
As I said earlier, this usage of the term "memory" is reserved for technical people.
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