U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Computers
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 07-28-2013, 04:42 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 4,205,672 times
Reputation: 6149

Advertisements

This is a question & topic I've noticed & pondered for sometime. It seems to me that when I first started getting into the Internet in the late 90s, and up until around 2004 or 2005 or so, one's Internet behavior had no bearing on their real life in terms of things they posted or said. If I wanted to, I could "ICQ" a lady & talk in whatever kind of way, and it had no bearing on my real life. If I had "racy" exchanges (I was single in those days) it had no bearing on my job or my personal life. It was as if we understood that I was "larrytxeast" and you were "cutegrl3214" or whatever and "what is said in ICQ STAYS in ICQ," and the sense I get is that even if someone in ICQ were to "expose" what you said in ICQ, the understanding was "well that's an ICQ conversation, it has no relevance here." At least that's the impression I get.

In like manner, I could debate philosophical merits & do so with very "talk show flavored" language, and it had no bearing in my real life whatsoever. I could have friends who loved the iPhone, for instance, go online as "larrytxeast" and bash Apple "iSheep" all day long & it had no bearing on my friends who were Apple fans, and in fact I still loved those people as my friends. I could go into the photography forum bashing the presence of video in fancier SLR cameras while all the while having a friend who PRACTICES such, with me really not having any bad feelings towards them personally, and it never "bled" into my relationship with that person. It was just that larrytxeast was where I got to vent. It was as if it was a completely alternate reality altogether. I tend to think of it as being somewhat like ham radio or the like.

Now, increasingly, although you do still have a lot of this (we can rant all day in these forums for instance & it's just ranting within this forum period), anymore if someone posts a particular YouTube video or rants within places like Reddit, it goes "viral" & they make a point to expose whoever the real person was, and have it come back to them in the real world. Except for a few specific arenas like Facebook, which is designed around the very principle of real names vs aliases, I don't see why it should be this way. To me the very reason for having the Internet is to be able to come to places like this forum and be "larrytxeast" and debate or talk about whatever we want to talk about, knowing that it wouldn't affect our "real life" in anyway. It's sort of like those early days of "virtual reality" where people would slip on those goggles & be someone else for awhile, it had no bearing on their real life.

Why is it now, when someone posts a rant on YouTube, they want to make it go "viral" & find out who the real person is, & confront them "why would you post that for the whole world to see?" Well if they are "larrytxeast" no one knows them from a whole in the ground, it doesn't matter to me. I browse YouTube for videos such as people making their cats chase a laser pointer or such, & to me it's as if they're just a "face in the crowd," I'm not worried about finding out their real name & where they live & such, even if what I see is something I don't agree with. I watch the video, I think of it whatever, and I do not even ponder trying to find out who the person really is & I sure as heck don't think about finding out who their employer is & confront their employer along the lines of "look at what your employee is saying, is that what type of employee you want working for you?"

To me, I don't care if I post anti-gay stuff condemning homosexuality while all the time I have a gay co-worker, so long as I treat that employee with respect at work, that is the ONLY thing that matters. The only exception would be if I were within Facebook with PUBLIC posts & making it clear where it was that I worked & also making light of who this co-worker is. But if I'm in the politics or current events of a forum like here as "larrytxeast" bashing the homosexual lifestyle, not mentioning real names etc, then it has zero relevance to my job or real life. In like manner, if I post photos of me having fun in a strip club and I'm "larrytxeast" and posting in a photo-hosting site like photobucket, then to viewers I'm just a "face in the crowd," I'm just some guy at a strip club somewhere.

What is with this trend towards trying to make what people say online anywhere go "viral" & become fair game for public discussion in the real-world etc? Again, if you're talking Facebook and PUBLIC (vs private) posts and people "tagging" each other with real names attached, then I somewhat understand. But if someone is posting privately and especially if they're "larrytxeast," why don't we just leave it in that realm and stop "un-masking" the persons?

LRH
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-28-2013, 11:36 PM
 
15,924 posts, read 17,656,019 times
Reputation: 7645
You actually expect someone to read all that???

LMAO
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2013, 12:02 AM
 
3,279 posts, read 4,205,672 times
Reputation: 6149
(plwhit) Yes I have noticed--in recent years people seem to want things very brief & quick. I come from an era of wordiness (then again even my college philosophy teacher told me my term paper was "wordy," and that was in 1989). I'm also cursed with the ability to type fast, as in around 75 words per minute.

A short version of what I was asking--when I started goofing around with the Internet in the late 90s the tendency, it seemed anyway, was that Internet was sort of like "ham radio" in that things in that realm didn't "spill over" into the real world. A person posting photos of them acting goofy during their leisure hours didn't create job-losing risks. A person could blog about whatever & never hear about it in their real world. Nothing ever went "viral." Heck I've seen crazy YouTube videos of people doing crazy things where you just saw the video & that was it, nothing more came of it, they were a "face in the crowd." We understood that your online personna was sort of like your "alias" or your "alternative" self, with zero relevance to the real world.

It still is that way in a lot of realms, such as forums (like this one), but not as much as before, & not just in Facebook, where it's kind of understandable, but everytime someone posts something a colorful rant in YouTube or posts a colorful post say in Reddit, it goes "viral," with them wanting to "un-mask" who the real person is & ask why they posted, whereas before we just read it & moved on, and let everything stay within the "alias" or "username" realm. Again, within Facebook, I kind of understand, but otherwise, I'm not understanding why people can't just leave it alone & let it stay within the "username" realm. To me such "un-masking" has a chilling effect on free expression & risks people being unemployed for after-work activities which aren't any of their boss' business, yet the person to me should be able to post about it and STILL not have any work repercussions, especially if they're posting within the "username" realm where they're a "face in the crowd" vs on Facebook where it's real names, public & they're also publicizing the name of their employer.

LRH
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2013, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
5,896 posts, read 4,421,807 times
Reputation: 3934
LOL! I got the gist of what you're saying Larry. And yes, I agree, it does seem like you have to watch what you say online, especially if it is on something like Twitter or Facebook. That is why I usually don't post anything political or "preachy" on either one. I have friends who do all the time, and it gets on my nerves. So, I usually keep Twitter and Facebook pretty vanilla. On discussion boards - it's a little different for me. Since I use a username and not my real name, I might be more inclined to being more confrontational (hopefully not in a bad way though) but I still try to maintain a certain level of respect - or at least give as much respect as to how much is given to me. I mean, if someone could "out" me on a public discussion board, I'm pretty confident that it wouldn't be very damaging of my private life.

Of course, blogs can be tricky, because people do often attach their real identities to their blogs. I guess luckily for me, I'm not disciplined enough to maintain an ongoing blog, lol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2013, 02:23 PM
 
15,924 posts, read 17,656,019 times
Reputation: 7645
Quote:
Originally Posted by larrytxeast View Post
(plwhit) Yes I have noticed--in recent years people seem to want things very brief & quick. I come from an era of wordiness (then again even my college philosophy teacher told me my term paper was "wordy," and that was in 1989). I'm also cursed with the ability to type fast, as in around 75 words per minute.

A short version of what I was asking--when I started goofing around with the Internet in the late 90s the tendency, it seemed anyway, was that Internet was sort of like "ham radio" in that things in that realm didn't "spill over" into the real world. A person posting photos of them acting goofy during their leisure hours didn't create job-losing risks. A person could blog about whatever & never hear about it in their real world. Nothing ever went "viral." Heck I've seen crazy YouTube videos of people doing crazy things where you just saw the video & that was it, nothing more came of it, they were a "face in the crowd." We understood that your online personna was sort of like your "alias" or your "alternative" self, with zero relevance to the real world.

It still is that way in a lot of realms, such as forums (like this one), but not as much as before, & not just in Facebook, where it's kind of understandable, but everytime someone posts something a colorful rant in YouTube or posts a colorful post say in Reddit, it goes "viral," with them wanting to "un-mask" who the real person is & ask why they posted, whereas before we just read it & moved on, and let everything stay within the "alias" or "username" realm. Again, within Facebook, I kind of understand, but otherwise, I'm not understanding why people can't just leave it alone & let it stay within the "username" realm. To me such "un-masking" has a chilling effect on free expression & risks people being unemployed for after-work activities which aren't any of their boss' business, yet the person to me should be able to post about it and STILL not have any work repercussions, especially if they're posting within the "username" realm where they're a "face in the crowd" vs on Facebook where it's real names, public & they're also publicizing the name of their employer.

LRH
This "unmasking" - are you telling us you are gay and coming out of the closet?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2014, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,582,705 times
Reputation: 6682
Quote:
Originally Posted by shyguylh View Post
This is a question & topic I've noticed & pondered for sometime. It seems to me that when I first started getting into the Internet in the late 90s, and up until around 2004 or 2005 or so, one's Internet behavior had no bearing on their real life in terms of things they posted or said. If I wanted to, I could "ICQ" a lady & talk in whatever kind of way, and it had no bearing on my real life. If I had "racy" exchanges (I was single in those days) it had no bearing on my job or my personal life. It was as if we understood that I was "larrytxeast" and you were "cutegrl3214" or whatever and "what is said in ICQ STAYS in ICQ," and the sense I get is that even if someone in ICQ were to "expose" what you said in ICQ, the understanding was "well that's an ICQ conversation, it has no relevance here." At least that's the impression I get.

In like manner, I could debate philosophical merits & do so with very "talk show flavored" language, and it had no bearing in my real life whatsoever. I could have friends who loved the iPhone, for instance, go online as "larrytxeast" and bash Apple "iSheep" all day long & it had no bearing on my friends who were Apple fans, and in fact I still loved those people as my friends. I could go into the photography forum bashing the presence of video in fancier SLR cameras while all the while having a friend who PRACTICES such, with me really not having any bad feelings towards them personally, and it never "bled" into my relationship with that person. It was just that larrytxeast was where I got to vent. It was as if it was a completely alternate reality altogether. I tend to think of it as being somewhat like ham radio or the like.

Now, increasingly, although you do still have a lot of this (we can rant all day in these forums for instance & it's just ranting within this forum period), anymore if someone posts a particular YouTube video or rants within places like Reddit, it goes "viral" & they make a point to expose whoever the real person was, and have it come back to them in the real world. Except for a few specific arenas like Facebook, which is designed around the very principle of real names vs aliases, I don't see why it should be this way. To me the very reason for having the Internet is to be able to come to places like this forum and be "larrytxeast" and debate or talk about whatever we want to talk about, knowing that it wouldn't affect our "real life" in anyway. It's sort of like those early days of "virtual reality" where people would slip on those goggles & be someone else for awhile, it had no bearing on their real life.

Why is it now, when someone posts a rant on YouTube, they want to make it go "viral" & find out who the real person is, & confront them "why would you post that for the whole world to see?" Well if they are "larrytxeast" no one knows them from a whole in the ground, it doesn't matter to me. I browse YouTube for videos such as people making their cats chase a laser pointer or such, & to me it's as if they're just a "face in the crowd," I'm not worried about finding out their real name & where they live & such, even if what I see is something I don't agree with. I watch the video, I think of it whatever, and I do not even ponder trying to find out who the person really is & I sure as heck don't think about finding out who their employer is & confront their employer along the lines of "look at what your employee is saying, is that what type of employee you want working for you?"

To me, I don't care if I post anti-gay stuff condemning homosexuality while all the time I have a gay co-worker, so long as I treat that employee with respect at work, that is the ONLY thing that matters. The only exception would be if I were within Facebook with PUBLIC posts & making it clear where it was that I worked & also making light of who this co-worker is. But if I'm in the politics or current events of a forum like here as "larrytxeast" bashing the homosexual lifestyle, not mentioning real names etc, then it has zero relevance to my job or real life. In like manner, if I post photos of me having fun in a strip club and I'm "larrytxeast" and posting in a photo-hosting site like photobucket, then to viewers I'm just a "face in the crowd," I'm just some guy at a strip club somewhere.

What is with this trend towards trying to make what people say online anywhere go "viral" & become fair game for public discussion in the real-world etc? Again, if you're talking Facebook and PUBLIC (vs private) posts and people "tagging" each other with real names attached, then I somewhat understand. But if someone is posting privately and especially if they're "larrytxeast," why don't we just leave it in that realm and stop "un-masking" the persons?

LRH
First, I want to say the comparison with amateur (ham) radio is faulty. Hams must ID with their callsign every ten minutes and at the beginning and end of conversations. This callsign is issued by the FCC and searchable both in their database and several free commercial extracts (such as QRZ.com), and contains their real name, address data, etc. Hams do not usually discuss "touchy topics"; in fact, they most often talk about the equipment they are making the contact with!

Maybe you're thinking of CB radio, which is unlicensed.

As for the importance of your posts in finding a job or your real-life reputation...I think people tend to exaggerate here, as if a public photo of you consuming an alcoholic beverage is going to disbar you from all jobs. However, a lot of HR workers do a Google search, check your Facebook and Twitter accounts, etc., and pictures or posts that are easily traced back to you might have an impact. Few, however, will expend the time and work necessary to do an extensive forensic investigation.

If there's been any changes here (such as the claim you made about 2004-05), they are tied into one of these factors:

1) The common use of full names on the internet, such as in Facebook profiles. In the really early Internet, posting your full name, work phone number, etc. was extremely common on USENET newsgroups; something I've done when I was bored is search through posts made in the 1980s and see where those people are today. Most people posted on the job. When services such as AOL and CompuServe became common, or people began to access the internet from home, screen names became very popular, and often were untraceable to the real user. Now that many sites interface with Facebook, real names are popular again.

2) The prevalence of user-generated photos and videos, often "selfies", which are identifiable through tags.

3) The rising importance of the Internet in general in society. In 2001, the majority of homes were connected to the Internet, but through dial-up and usually just one computer; the amount of time any person spent on the computer was often limited by other family members' needs as well as the fact that the phone line was clogged up when they were on the internet.

Today, the Internet is ubiquitous in most of our lives; we regularly check our phones for Facebook updates, watch movies and TVs on our flat-screens through the Internet, video-chat on our tablets with our friends, stream songs via Pandora to our stereo systems (actually, who today has a stereo system?), etc. "Surfing the web" used to be a defined activity; now, most of many persons' actions relate closely to the internet somehow.

4) The rising level of expertise among HR professionals and others who surveil people. Computer and internet literacy have grown by bounds in the general public, not to mention those concerned with lives and examples of others.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Computers
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:14 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top