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Old 02-13-2014, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Northville, MI
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Just want to ask your opinion. It takes me a long time to write code correctly. Always involves several rounds of testing and debugging before the problem is finally solved in a sensible manner. I am just starting to learn Java, and have run into some difficulties using it. How much experience does it take for one to be familiar with writing computer code in object oriented languages. I learned MATLAB, and it took me around 6 months to learn the language with reasonable fluency. But MATLAB is primarily a numerical analysis tool rather than programming language. Please share your experiences in relation to object oriented programming and how to become fluent in using them.
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Old 02-13-2014, 01:21 PM
 
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Don't get discouraged. OOP is one of those "wrap your head around it" things where there will ALWAYS be several rounds of debugging to get it working perfectly.

I'm fairly new to my programming position and some days I feel like a 3 year old trying to do brain surgery, then a half hour later I slap myself in the face when I realize there's an extra space where there shouldn't be. I think it just comes with the territory. My coworker/mentor is vastly better at it than I am, he's been in the business for 12 years, and he says he still has those days.
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Old 02-13-2014, 01:32 PM
 
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JAVA is a bit tougher to learn OOP on if you've never done it before. C++, PHP, etc. are easier to start with because OOP is not strictly enforced... so you can transition to it. Where JAVA is OOP and that's it.
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Old 02-14-2014, 10:36 AM
 
Location: SoCal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
JAVA is a bit tougher to learn OOP on if you've never done it before. C++, PHP, etc. are easier to start with because OOP is not strictly enforced... so you can transition to it. Where JAVA is OOP and that's it.
My opinion is that makes Java the best language to learn OOP on. It'll keep you from learning "bad" (non-object-oriented) habits. Although I don't know much about it, C# may be another language to learn on - it's very Java-like.
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Old 02-14-2014, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Northville, MI
11,882 posts, read 11,441,057 times
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Originally Posted by oddstray View Post
It'll keep you from learning "bad" (non-object-oriented) habits.
What does that mean. Can you explain. Being new to OOP, I dont want to develop bad habits right off the bat.
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Old 02-14-2014, 04:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Adi from the Brunswicks View Post
What does that mean. Can you explain. Being new to OOP, I dont want to develop bad habits right off the bat.
If you have a few hours, take a listen:


Object-Oriented Programming Principles (2012) - YouTube

It's good intermediate information.
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Old 02-14-2014, 06:56 PM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,952,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oddstray View Post
My opinion is that makes Java the best language to learn OOP on. It'll keep you from learning "bad" (non-object-oriented) habits. Although I don't know much about it, C# may be another language to learn on - it's very Java-like.
That makes quite an assumption. That assumes that object-oriented is good and non-object-oriented is bad. And that couldn't be further than the truth. There are times when each of them is a better fit.
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Old 02-17-2014, 10:14 AM
 
Location: SoCal
6,118 posts, read 9,723,900 times
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Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
That makes quite an assumption. That assumes that object-oriented is good and non-object-oriented is bad. And that couldn't be further than the truth. There are times when each of them is a better fit.
Absolutely! That's why I put "bad" in quotes and explained that what I meant was non-object-oriented. I think you clarified it much better than I did.
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Old 03-05-2014, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Reno
843 posts, read 1,875,807 times
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I'm going to be the devils advocate here, do get discouraged. Not everyone can be a programmer, some will never get it. If you can't bootstrap your own learning, IMO you shouldn't be trying to enter the field.

If that doesn't encourage you to dig in and figure it out (and tell me to **** off ;-), you might want to look into another line.
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Old 03-06-2014, 10:28 AM
 
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It's not rocket surgery. The good programmers outshine the not-so-good ones not because the language is hard or they can't grasp syntax or something like that, it's the thought process behind how things should be structured. I've learned it's much more about being good at engineering something rather than actually learning how to code. There are tools at your disposal that will help you immensely and they can be easily learned, but if you can't wrap your head around the problem to begin with, your solution may become convoluted or even non-functional.

Saying that, if you enjoy programming, you can absolutely learn and grow. You will see your own short-comings VERY quickly and you can work on those as you progress.
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