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Old 04-16-2014, 08:19 PM
 
8,402 posts, read 20,657,715 times
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I bought my refurb Dell laptop with Win7 on ebay last year. It came with the OEM W7 disc. I had to use the warranty 6 months after I bought the laptop, and it was no problem through Dell.
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Old 04-17-2014, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Treasure/Space coast.
349 posts, read 349,532 times
Reputation: 328
I would stick with Dell or Lenovo and slap "classicshell" onto Windows 8, problem solved.
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Old 04-17-2014, 10:55 PM
 
Location: California & Texas
157 posts, read 307,838 times
Reputation: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
That is different. You certainly can buy a retail version of Windows and Install it on one Computer.

Amazon.com: Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64bit, System Builder OEM DVD 1 Pack (New Packaging): Software

What you are refering to is when you buy a computer and IT comes with a Windows 7 disk. That Windows 7 is tied to that computer and is called an OEM version. This cannot be legally used on another computer.
A retail version does not work this way...
You are correct that you can buy retail and install it wherever you want. But this discussion is about OEM licensing, not retail. Read the thread to follow the conversation.
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Old 04-17-2014, 10:56 PM
 
Location: California & Texas
157 posts, read 307,838 times
Reputation: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaceAndLove42 View Post
Huh? What do you mean you can't? Last September I bought all the parts needed to build a computer, along with that, built my own computer and installed that and it worked fine, just like all the other times I have built my own computers and used OEM windows. I honestly don't even remember the last time I actually bought retail.
But it's illegal. You are pirating Windows. You should purchase a retail copy for your own use.
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Old 04-18-2014, 04:08 PM
 
1,030 posts, read 1,252,336 times
Reputation: 2398
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnemployedandLovingIt View Post
But it's illegal. You are pirating Windows. You should purchase a retail copy for your own use.
Illegal or just against the TOS? Regardless, like I care. Kind of like jaywalking sure it's "illegal" but people do it all the time and no one ever gets in trouble for it. I am certainly not going to pay the absurd amount for an OS. Not to mention, unless you called Microsoft up and said "Hey I built my own PC and installed OEM OS" it would be impossible for them to know.
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Old 04-18-2014, 09:02 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 85,063,717 times
Reputation: 18083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
That is different. You certainly can buy a retail version of Windows and Install it on one Computer.

Amazon.com: Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64bit, System Builder OEM DVD 1 Pack (New Packaging): Software

What you are refering to is when you buy a computer and IT comes with a Windows 7 disk. That Windows 7 is tied to that computer and is called an OEM version. This cannot be legally used on another computer.
A retail version does not work this way...
Because i9ts a copy of OEM which is cheaper bought that way thru MS.Its like buying a million eggs versus one.
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Old 04-19-2014, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
82 posts, read 110,776 times
Reputation: 134
Not illegal, but against the EULA (End User License Agreement). We have this little thing called innocent until proven guilty.

Just how many Microsoft customers have been proven to be guilty of violating its EULA? Answer: None.

So just how enforceable are EULA's? Well, sometimes the court will side with the company, and sometimes with consumers. Microsoft however hasn't tested thier EULA's in court.

This quote, taken from Windows Secrets, sums it up "If Microsoft truly considers the Windows EULA enforceable, you’d think the company would’ve taken at least one of the tens of millions of licensees to court. No doubt Microsoft has many reasons why it has avoided putting its putative contract to the test, but one in particular occurs to me.

Imagine the consequences if a U.S. court found — for whatever reason — that the Windows EULA isn’t enforceable against an individual Microsoft customer."

Yeah, I know that article was written in 2009, but I don't think Microsoft's enforcement of its EULA has changed as it bears repeating. "Imagine the consequences if a U.S. court found — for whatever reason — that the Windows EULA isn’t enforceable "

So as long as you have a license from Microsoft, for the version of the software you are using, you are good. Be it retail license, upgrade license, or OEM license, Microsoft isn't going to prosecute you for using the wrong type of license.

Now if you go and install one license on multiple computers. Or don't have a license at all. Then expect Microsoft to sue you if you are caught.
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Old 04-20-2014, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Oroville, California
3,316 posts, read 4,872,833 times
Reputation: 6030
Regarding MS's convoluted, conflicting, ever-changing, esoteric OEM licensing all I can say is "whatever" (and one can interpret what that means to me personally and my usage of such software anyway they might like).
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Old 04-20-2014, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Wappingers Falls, NY
1,618 posts, read 2,000,382 times
Reputation: 1094
FYI, any machine sold with Windows 8 is booting in UEFI mode. Windows 7 is pretty shaky in UEFI mode, at best, according to my experience.

On the other hand, business laptops such as Dell Latitudes and Lenovo Thinkpads can be bought with Windows 7 pre-installed still. Technically they're selling you a Windows 8.1 Pro license, which comes with Windows 7 downgrade rights, so they're basically just downgrading it for you.
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Old 04-20-2014, 06:10 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 85,063,717 times
Reputation: 18083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorath View Post
Not illegal, but against the EULA (End User License Agreement). We have this little thing called innocent until proven guilty.

Just how many Microsoft customers have been proven to be guilty of violating its EULA? Answer: None.

So just how enforceable are EULA's? Well, sometimes the court will side with the company, and sometimes with consumers. Microsoft however hasn't tested thier EULA's in court.

This quote, taken from Windows Secrets, sums it up "If Microsoft truly considers the Windows EULA enforceable, you’d think the company would’ve taken at least one of the tens of millions of licensees to court. No doubt Microsoft has many reasons why it has avoided putting its putative contract to the test, but one in particular occurs to me.

Imagine the consequences if a U.S. court found — for whatever reason — that the Windows EULA isn’t enforceable against an individual Microsoft customer."

Yeah, I know that article was written in 2009, but I don't think Microsoft's enforcement of its EULA has changed as it bears repeating. "Imagine the consequences if a U.S. court found — for whatever reason — that the Windows EULA isn’t enforceable "

So as long as you have a license from Microsoft, for the version of the software you are using, you are good. Be it retail license, upgrade license, or OEM license, Microsoft isn't going to prosecute you for using the wrong type of license.

Now if you go and install one license on multiple computers. Or don't have a license at all. Then expect Microsoft to sue you if you are caught.
That is the Bart Simpson excuse. If you steal; your a thief; plain and simple. Your talking abut criminal responsibility as determined by society for punishment; quite different. Society to be civil relies on people self policing and rule of law. Most ten year olds know that.
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