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Old 02-05-2015, 01:22 PM
 
7,249 posts, read 5,709,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DPolo View Post
I just googled what Facebook uses, and it says it's build with PHP, not JavaScript...
If you look through their job postings, you'll see that they're using PHP, Javascript, C++, Java, etc. They also have their own language called Hack.
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Old 02-15-2015, 03:39 AM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,979,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DPolo View Post
I just googled what Facebook uses, and it says it's build with PHP, not JavaScript...
You don't have to google anything. You can go directly to Facebook and see that they use JavaScript for their web application. You can also see that they have a few (akamai fronted) poll calls to php services. It looks like they are mostly JavaScript for the website, at least.
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Old 02-19-2015, 05:00 AM
 
4,366 posts, read 3,648,486 times
Reputation: 2928
Default Techie Jobs

I'm almost kicking myself right now. I took out around 100K in student loans to get a degree in English and a master's in Education; these are useless degrees from my perspective. I have still not been able to find a good job with either one, and I also found out a few months ago that I probably have ASD (also known as Asperger's Syndrome), so I'm probably not going to ever be that good with kids anyway.

I would love to go back and get certified in computer programming or some other IT job that really paid well, but I just don't have the money, and I don't want to get caught in another debt trap. I need to do something, though. Right now, I'm stuck as a substitute teacher, and I hate this job for several reasons, the main ones being that the kids treat me like a second-class citizen, if even that well, and I make about as much as a person on minimum wage year-round. I need a better set of options. Does anyone know of how I could use the skills I have now to transition into a tech job? If not, what should I do?

These are my areas of interest:

Life Science (I'm thinking about getting a plain old biology degree, but the college I want to go to won't be recognized for certification. I was thinking about going to WGU online and getting my credentials transferred to Utah, but they don't have an option to become certified once completing their science program.)

Technology
I like tinkering and building things, but I'm not much of a self-starter.

Computer Programming
I barely know basic HTML and CSS right now, though.

Languages
I took the lazy lady's route and learned how to instruct English as a Foreign Language as a native English speaker, but I'm highly interested in most foreign languages. I just don't have the money to take the classes or the discipline to study and learn more than a few phrases on my own. I'm also really impatient and often try to learn too much at once.)

Writing
I did major in literature and language arts.

Last edited by krmb; 02-19-2015 at 05:17 AM..
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Old 02-19-2015, 09:46 AM
 
Location: North America
14,210 posts, read 10,319,967 times
Reputation: 5547
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmb501 View Post
I'm almost kicking myself right now. I took out around 100K in student loans to get a degree in English and a master's in Education; these are useless degrees from my perspective. I have still not been able to find a good job with either one, and I also found out a few months ago that I probably have ASD (also known as Asperger's Syndrome), so I'm probably not going to ever be that good with kids anyway.

I would love to go back and get certified in computer programming or some other IT job that really paid well, but I just don't have the money, and I don't want to get caught in another debt trap. I need to do something, though. Right now, I'm stuck as a substitute teacher, and I hate this job for several reasons, the main ones being that the kids treat me like a second-class citizen, if even that well, and I make about as much as a person on minimum wage year-round. I need a better set of options. Does anyone know of how I could use the skills I have now to transition into a tech job? If not, what should I do?

These are my areas of interest:

Life Science (I'm thinking about getting a plain old biology degree, but the college I want to go to won't be recognized for certification. I was thinking about going to WGU online and getting my credentials transferred to Utah, but they don't have an option to become certified once completing their science program.)

Technology
I like tinkering and building things, but I'm not much of a self-starter.

Computer Programming
I barely know basic HTML and CSS right now, though.

Languages
I took the lazy lady's route and learned how to instruct English as a Foreign Language as a native English speaker, but I'm highly interested in most foreign languages. I just don't have the money to take the classes or the discipline to study and learn more than a few phrases on my own. I'm also really impatient and often try to learn too much at once.)

Writing
I did major in literature and language arts.
You don't need to necessarily spend a lot of money to get into it. I would suggest getting a+, network+, and possibly the windows 7 MCSA and then looking for an entry level help desk position. Getting a well paying job is going to depend on time though. You will make anywhere from 10-15 dollars depending on location. Making more money will require moving up the ladder. As for programming, you can do that with no certification. However, you need to be well versed in multiple languages.
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Old 02-19-2015, 10:30 AM
 
4,366 posts, read 3,648,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ~HecateWhisperCat~ View Post
You don't need to necessarily spend a lot of money to get into it. I would suggest getting a+, network+, and possibly the windows 7 MCSA and then looking for an entry level help desk position. Getting a well paying job is going to depend on time though. You will make anywhere from 10-15 dollars depending on location. Making more money will require moving up the ladder. As for programming, you can do that with no certification. However, you need to be well versed in multiple languages.
Where should I start? I'm really bad at managing time. I go to work, go to my volunteer job, and then go back home, mess around on the Internet, and go to bed.
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Old 02-19-2015, 10:55 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,872 posts, read 3,116,189 times
Reputation: 4882
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmb501 View Post
Where should I start? I'm really bad at managing time. I go to work, go to my volunteer job, and then go back home, mess around on the Internet, and go to bed.
This will hold you back from most careers. Perhaps you should determine why you are bad at managing time and try to fix it instead of accepting it as just the way you are.
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Old 02-19-2015, 12:16 PM
 
4,366 posts, read 3,648,486 times
Reputation: 2928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adhom View Post
This will hold you back from most careers. Perhaps you should determine why you are bad at managing time and try to fix it instead of accepting it as just the way you are.
Here are the reasons I think I'm bad at managing my time / getting organized:



  • When I take a class, all of the resources I need are laid out in an orderly fashion, and the instructor sets a reasonable schedule to learn the material.
  • When I'm on my own, though, I have to hunt for the resources myself. For one, it takes too long to hunt for the resources to actually start using them.
  • Also, my learning schedule, if I ever get around to creating one, is not realistic. Often, the resources I find for self study have loads of handy tips, but they aren't actually teaching me what I need to know about the field. Since, I get no where with this or make very little discernable progress, I usually stop.
  • For example, a phrasebook of the three hundred most used phrases in Spanish might be helpful, but it isn't a course in Spanish, only a piece of supplementary material. To really learn Spanish, I would need a textbook. Finding a textbook for certain subjects is very hard, and they are usually expensive. When it comes to computer programming, I don't even know where to start.
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Old 02-19-2015, 01:29 PM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
4,603 posts, read 8,203,327 times
Reputation: 5185
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~HecateWhisperCat~ View Post
You don't need to necessarily spend a lot of money to get into it. I would suggest getting a+, network+, and possibly the windows 7 MCSA and then looking for an entry level help desk position. Getting a well paying job is going to depend on time though. You will make anywhere from 10-15 dollars depending on location. Making more money will require moving up the ladder. As for programming, you can do that with no certification. However, you need to be well versed in multiple languages.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmb501 View Post
Where should I start? I'm really bad at managing time. I go to work, go to my volunteer job, and then go back home, mess around on the Internet, and go to bed.
You can start with books. And you should also get some old computers to setup a lab. The problem here is that these things will still require some type of investment. Books are $30+ and setting up a lab will be at least a few hundred to over a thousand depending on what you currently have and are looking to do. Not to mention these certifications will cost you $250+ for the tests alone.

And also keep in mind that in these type of roles, people look for experience. Yes, it's entry level, but the fact of the matter is that tech skills are somewhat common these days. You'll be competing against folks that just graduated college (or H.S.) that have been tinkering with computer pretty much all their life. So it may not be "professional experience", but some may have been building and troubleshooting computers and simple networks for years. And because of these factors - I would recommend against any type of formal training as the cost for these "remedial" certs. are often a waste from a job investment standpoint.

Since you have an education background, your other option is to research opportunities as a corporate trainer. And you can 'weave' a tech concentration into that. e.g. look for places that are hiring trainers. Then see if you can do software/application training down the road.

Finally - Adhom's advice is golden. You need to learn to manage your time.
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Old 02-19-2015, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Wandering.
3,545 posts, read 5,682,491 times
Reputation: 2664
To add to what's already here:

IMO you can absolutely learn software development and get into the industry without any sort of formal training or certification, but you really have to love doing it, and be driven to continually learn more. It's an industry that requires a lot of time and energy to master, and changes constantly.
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Old 02-20-2015, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
5,896 posts, read 4,421,807 times
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Here's the thing with IT. It comes down to what you know. Your "on the job" experience. Someone with 10 years experience as a C# computer programmer, who happens to only have a 2 year associate degree, is more valuable than someone who has a four year degree but no experience. Now you may ask, how did that programmer get a job with just a 2 year degree? Well, that person, more than likely, worked their way up to their position. They started out in entry level, which doesn't equate to a lot of $$$.

Which brings me to my next point. Don't get into IT for the money. Get into IT because you truly have a love for technology. Because, the truth is, you're not guaranteed to make a lot of money in IT. And especially not in the early going. If you're following the money, you're going to want to get on with some private sector company, but be prepared to get frazzled with the competitiveness of the private sector. It's cut-throat! The public sector is much safer to work in, but you're not going to make six figures unless you're in management. Even then, you may not make six figures a year. And of course, a lot depends upon which part of the country you work in. I work in NC, so if I'm making $100k/year, I'm in the upper class in terms of salary. That's not probably true if I'm making $100k/year in New York City. And I can tell you that making six figures in the public sector means that you're in upper - upper management. You're a director or CIO of some agency or college. You're not a System Administrator. If you're an SA or a programmer, you're making in the $30k - $65k per year.

And finally, if you're not good with managing your time, don't be a programmer. Those guys are up against deadlines all the time. While much of IT takes analytical, logical, thinking, programming takes a very logical, systematic, follow a process from start to finish, sort of thinking. You need to know how you want a specific module to work and a good idea of how to program it and how long it would take you to achieve the task. It can be a very stressful job giving the circumstance. You can stand to make a lot of money being a programmer, but from what I have been seeing, programming is becoming more and more contract based than it was before - which means you're not always employed! Now, someone else may come in and disagree based on their experience and their neck of the woods, but I've seen this to be true where I live and my experience.

So, basically, it boils down to this. Don't get into IT for the money. Because IT can turn out to be like watching paint dry if you truly don't have a love for it.
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