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Old 06-10-2016, 04:33 PM
Bo Bo won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Tenth Edition (Apr-May 2014). 

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Location: Ohio
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Quote:
Any technical knowledge you recommend I should know for Desktop support?
Most well-paying Desktop Support jobs will require at least a COMP-TIA A+ certificate. By the time you do the prep work for the 2 exams that comprise the A+ cert, you will have an understanding of the hard and soft skills needed to get through the interview questions.
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Old 06-10-2016, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bo View Post
Most well-paying Desktop Support jobs will require at least a COMP-TIA A+ certificate. By the time you do the prep work for the 2 exams that comprise the A+ cert, you will have an understanding of the hard and soft skills needed to get through the interview questions.
Good advice thanks
what about the Enterprise Desktop Support Cert?
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Old 06-10-2016, 06:26 PM
Bo Bo won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Tenth Edition (Apr-May 2014). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmoStars View Post
what about the Enterprise Desktop Support Cert?
In my area, that one doesn't seem to be considered an equivalent, in most cases. I still see quite a few jobs advertised that require the A+. So not having it is likely to prevent a resume from getting past the HR screen for the job.

In smaller shops, they often want the Network+ cert, too... either because there isn't a network tech on the staff or the network tech is overworked and they want you to be able to troubleshoot as many network issues as you can without bothering the network tech!
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Old 06-11-2016, 01:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bo View Post
In my area, that one doesn't seem to be considered an equivalent, in most cases. I still see quite a few jobs advertised that require the A+. So not having it is likely to prevent a resume from getting past the HR screen for the job.
That's the point. if you can't manage to pass the A+.. you're likely not going to pick up what is needed to do the job.

Even a lapsed A+ is better than never having it. Of course.. I'm lucky.. Sort of.. I guess.. I got my A+.. the card says May 1, 1997. They were valid for life back then. No recerts.
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Old 06-12-2016, 06:39 AM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
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Specific technical knowledge will depend on the company you're interviewing with, the software they use and the IT platform they are on. For example, someone experienced on the same helpdesk software or asset inventory tool is going have a leg up.

In a general sense, I'd say for entry level roles like DS. You're looking more at attitude/personality (as Peregrine mentioned). As they say - "Hire for attitude, train for skill".

You can walk in as a PowerShell expert and have the skills to be a sys admin. But if you throw off the vibe that users are idiots and people need to be told what to do and when to do it, you're going to lose that job to a lesser skilled candidate with a pleasant attitude. I can develop skills, I can't change personality.
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Old 06-13-2016, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
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Exactly. Being able to walk into someone's office who called "because their computer is dead" and NOT making them feel like an idiot because the monitor was off? The importance of being able to do that can not be understated.
As Macroy said so succinctly, I'd rather hire someone who's good at that and train them to use NBTSTAT, then train them to treat people with respect.
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Old 06-19-2016, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmoStars View Post
For anything like

Desktop Support
Help Desk Level 2
Computer Support Specialist Tier II
Or Service Desk II

What do employers expect you to be knowledgeable about in technical terms?
I am about to be interview for these positions pretty soon so I do want to know what knowledge is required for these positions and skills.
And when I say knowledge I mean technical knowledge ( not customer service skills)
I am currently reviewing the A+ and also the Enterprise Desktop Support Cert knowledge.
Technical support is 90% customer service. Lack of customer service, or inability to communicate effectively, is one of the reasons I no longer work in customer service. You may be better off working with technology hands on, or as a computer operator, rather that be literally, as in supporting old Unix software, or in the abstract, such as work as a master control operator at a TV station or a similar job in a radio station.

Getting the certification is one thing. Being able to know the material fluidly because you have a hands on experience with the concepts is another.

I'll tell you what my professor told me in college, which still haunts me, 25 years after the fact. It doesn't mean anything to learn all of this stuff about programming academically and I never do it in my spare time, on my own, for fun. If you're only learning it to pay a test, exam, or a class, you don't know anything.

I think he knew, back then, that I wasn't serious about computers and I wasn't cut out for it. I had to learn the hard way.

That's the best advice I have. If you don't live or breathe tech, don't waste time. Not yours, not anyone else. Don't get me wrong you can make a living wage in tech support, and I did for a long time, but the level of BS that goes on in Tier II (as I've shadowed support specialists and I've been the consumer on the other end of the call) is astounding. And that is nothing but customer service; not because the tech was not adept, but because the caller had the tech between a rock and a hard place.

Sometimes, the more you know, and the more you walk the customer through, the longer your day, and the longer your call. And you get penalized for that from your employer. It is a fine line to walk and every tech needs to weigh their options, no matter how talented. Tier II is no place to play games, and it can be as difficult to find another job as it was to get the job you have. Certifications will get you in the door but if you don't do it for fun, laughs and giggles you won't be around long. Most level II techs I knew worked something else similar on the side or had other extracurricular interests in computing, it wasn't just a job for them. The successful ones, at least.
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Old 06-20-2016, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labonte18 View Post
You need to know one phrase.

"Have you tried turning it off and back on again?"
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Old 06-20-2016, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Whittier
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmoStars View Post
In the Desktop Interview they have asked me like

What the NSLOOKUP do?
Describe a scenario where you working with a Co worker and you both agree on different things?
Also like how can you find a mac address?
How do you troubleshoot an IP conflict address or mapping a drive?
Things like that mostly I know what it means but I really don't do this kind of work every day at the help desk.
Any technical knowledge you recommend I should know for Desktop support?

For a desktop support the A+ is pretty good overall training.

I used to watch Professor Messer's videos on youtube and bought an A+ book. If you have time you really should study the N+ and S+ as well. You don't necessarily have to take the tests, just know the basics.

Basically you should know Windows inside and out. You should know all of the basic commands. ipconfig is a pretty big one.

You should learn how to do basic scripting/batch files.

You should also learn a bit of AD, how to add accounts, computers, etc.

The hardware part is easy but can be overwhelming on the A+ test basically because it's most of it is useless knowledge. I don't need to know how many pins a certain thing has, but I should know what a hard drive is and how it differs from RAM. And if you're even slightly familiar with the innards of a computer you should do well.

----------------

This won't get you the job alone, but other's have told you is: Be very customer service oriented, and be willing to learn.

There are some genius techs, but a lot of them can be jerks.

Google is your friend. If it wasn't for Google, and some peer mentoring, I wouldn't know half as much about things like MDT/WDS, SCCM/WSUS, etc...

I've been at my current sysadmin/desktop hybrid role for a while now, and so problems usually aren't too complicated. However if there's something that does pop up and I don't know, (the big secret is) I'll ask others in my dept. and then check Google to find out. If you're nice and prompt in responding to calls and say, "I'll have to get back to you on this," a majority of the time people are understanding.

If you go up to a user and say, non-ironically, "What did you do this time?!" You're going to be on a short leash; given less leeway.

----------------

In the end each company is different. Each company has their own equipment, their own systems, their own style. During your interviews you need to ask THEM about some of their systems. If they are deploying any new technologies in the future. What do they currently use, etc. Are they transferring to cloud based AD, if so why. If not, why not?

Granted you wouldn't ask the HR manger these things as they'll probably be clueless, but if you get an interview with a direct manager those are some things to ask.

Those sorts of questions would narrow down the skills needed.
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