U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Computers
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-09-2016, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 18,270,440 times
Reputation: 6728

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
If it was up to me, I'd still be using Win98 and Netscape. I'm 71.

But it's not up to me.

Two years ago I built my own computer. Figured it all out, bought all the parts, bought my own copy of Win7 64 bit, and built in all the stuff I use and none of the stuff I don't.

It was a great adventure! My computer works great and has a backup hard drive built right in. It should be good for years to come and if it ever crashes I have everything I need to get it cooking again.

Glad to hear everyone loves Win10, and I will probably switch in due time.
But not soon.
It's important to have an external backup as well. Just in case you have something like a fire or similar catastrophe. I have portable Seagate drives that back up the computer on a regular basis. One is attached to my computer - and one is in my safe deposit box. Rotate them about once a month. Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-09-2016, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 18,270,440 times
Reputation: 6728
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
I am sticking to Windows7 and Office 2007 and Firefox indefinitely. I have had no problems with the computer in seven years.

My mobile devices are all Android and I use Chrome exclusively on those.

My Windows Surface crapped out two weeks ago after ONLY three years of fairly limited use and I am switching over to a Chromebook. I received it as a retirement gift and never learned to love it. I was not unhappy to see it go as it was one of the worst engineered computer device I've used.
Windows 7 is scheduled to bite the dust at the beginning of 2020 - like Windows XP did a while back. So - unless you have a terminal disease (hope not!!!!) - you will outlive your operating system . Don't recall how old you are - but if you think it's hard to change operating systems now - well it won't be any easier 3 1/2 years from now.

My husband is a big Chromebook fan. The only downside in terms of what he does that I've seen is setting up a cloud-based wireless printer is a relatively big PITA. I do different things with my computer than my husband does. So a Chromebook isn't a good everyday solution for me. OTOH - I do have a little Chromebook that I travel with. And it does the job on our relatively short trips (usually not more than 10 days). Also - you pretty much don't have to worry about anyone stealing a Chromebook when you're traveling. First - because they're so cheap (I got mine at a Christmas sale at Best Buy for about $125). Second - because whatever sensitive information you have when it comes to your Chromebook is "in the cloud" (and password protected). If I had one of those super-expensive Apple products - I'd probably feel compelled to lock it in a hotel room safe every night. Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 18,270,440 times
Reputation: 6728
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
When my last Windows 10 laptop battery failed to hold a charge, I decided to go to an I-Pad, something I have resisted for many years. Now I'm so sold on it that I upgraded to an I-Phone also, and they keep in sync with each other.
Windows 10 is only a year old. What brand of laptop that isn't over a year old wouldn't hold a battery charge? Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 22,745,181 times
Reputation: 3896
Quote:
Originally Posted by jim9251 View Post
You mean I shouldn't use Windows 3.11 anymore? And I finally got my modem to dial up AOL at 9600 baud too.
9600 bps. I think V.32 was 2400 baud, 4 bits/baud. Sheesh.

[Insert Fido COMMS echo FAQ here] Hehee...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 18,270,440 times
Reputation: 6728
Quote:
Originally Posted by Modification Specialist View Post
I've worked with my and others peoples computers since the mid 90's. Since the OP has already purchased a computer with Windows 10. The best thing you can do now is get a firewall. My suggestion is installing AVAST. What ever you do - stay away from NORTON...

  • The "Windows 10 Big Advantage---It is FREE"..... think about it... The applications that come installed tend to "phone home" with your computer use and your surfing habits. No doubt so they can sell your information to third party's.
  • Windows 8 - is a very secure operating system, but the major problem it takes forever to boot. Loading countless programs using up the ram. So when you open up more than a few programs. The computer slows down, if not locks up.
  • My favorite operating system is Windows 7. You can control what programs are running in the back ground.
Just last weekend was on a clients computer - her saying she could not opening up a PDF document. Within 30 seconds found the problem - with the Chrome browser. She left her connection open listening to music. The audio application used up all the memory on her hard drive. That being said - my suggestion for surfing the internet is installing Firefox. You can add "Add-On's" that prevent adds and pop-ups... Here's links for free downloads Simple Computer Care | PRO Business - Responsive Multi-Purpose Theme – Free Downloads

Good Luck
Hi - I'm the OP and I'm not sure you read my message closely. I had an old computer running XP (which I liked a lot) - and just bought a totally new computer system with Windows 10. Which - after 10 days - seems pretty ok to me.

I practice "safe computing". There are 4 basic rules IMO.

1. Don't go to porn sites.

2. Don't go to "celebrity" websites.

3. Don't click on any email links/attachments unless you're absolutely positively sure what they are and you're expecting them. Which means never clicking on anything that's supposedly from your bank - or someone you know. If it means throwing 95% of these links/attachments in the trash - so be it.

4. Never rely on "security" software to protect you if you ignore Rules 1-3.

FWIW - I listen to Pandora music in the background a lot. And it doesn't eat up all my memory (or anywhere close to it).

I do use Firefox - which I like. But often don't mind pop-up ads (especially when I'm shopping for something on line and businesses are angling for my business). Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 18,270,440 times
Reputation: 6728
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
It's just a tool. Corporate IT knows how to administer Microsoft and all the corporate stuff I use assumes Microsoft. If I have a problem, I launch TeamViewer, send an email, and somebody remotes into my machine and sorts it out. If I insisted on a Mac or Linux, I'd be stuck doing it all the administration stuff myself and having to figure out how to do all the corporate things myself that use home brew tools that aren't supported on a Mac or Linux.

If I need Linux, I just telnet to a host on the corporate network. I don't do that very often these days.
That's really the bottom line IMO. When one of my brothers started using Apple stuff after he retired about 5 years ago - he got "dumbed down". When he visits - he has to use my computer to run some financial things. And his email is very unpredictable. When he forwarded an email to me last year - guess he was using the defaults - and it was attached to a half dozen emails his wife had sent to other people - stuff I wasn't supposed to see. It was quite a family mess . Overall - I suspect it is possible to use Apple products in an adult professional way. But - if you don't spend the time necessary to learn how to do that - which is probably pretty much the same amount of time you're going to have to spend learning how to use Windows products - you'll wind up working at a 10 year old level.

My other brother is still working. For a major US corporation. All of his stuff is still Windows based.

FWIW - I have worked in some Unix systems/universes. I'm ok when it comes to tech stuff - but not great - and it was very hard for me to learn how to work in that environment.

BTW - the first computer I bought was an IBM 5120 - back in about 1980. Cost about $25k. The advances in terms of computing/the price of computing since then have been nothing short of amazing. Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 18,270,440 times
Reputation: 6728
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
Robyn55, I do love Microsoft Outlook for email. I purchase the fairly new Microsoft Office 365 yearly ($65 or $70) which includes the Microsoft Outlook product for email.

(plus Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, and Microsoft Powerpoint are all included in Microsoft Office 365 - none of which I use except for occasionally Word. But one has to purchase Microsoft Office 365 to access Microsoft Outlook for email)

I run this, by the way, on my Macbook, rather than a PC. It works on both.

https://www.microsoftstore.com/store...160808210217:s

https://www.microsoftstore.com/store...oryID.68021500
I bought a permanent MSFT Office license for this computer (which cost about $160).

I've never used Outlook before - only Outlook Express. Reckon I will get the hang of it in terms of doing the things I want to do the way I like to do them. Will just take more than a week. Will probably wind up customizing the program a fair amount. But I want to work with it for a few weeks before I start to change anything. FWIW - I use Word a lot too - Excel occasionally - and hardly ever use Powerpoint. I have OneNote too now. But haven't had the time yet to figure out what it does (there's a limit to what you can do in a week). Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 18,270,440 times
Reputation: 6728
Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaDL View Post
For laptops, I strongly recommend getting one with solid state drive (hard drives are not robust enough for high probability of dropping - important for senior citizens).

2gb of memory is quite inadequate. Media rich internet surfing requires a lot of memory. I'd think 4gb is the minimum, preferably 8gb memory

32gb storage is also very limited and don't allow much room for loading programs let alone storing pictures, videos etc. I'd suggest at least 80gb and use SD card to store files (64gb SD cards cost about $30).

I stick with my recommendation to get Lenovo laptops for reliability. I got a refurbished T430 last year with 8gb memory and 160gb solid state drive for something like $350 (it was on sale) with a free extended 1 year warranty.
I too have been very happy with my Lenovo products - and my IBM products before Lenovo bought out the IBM computer division.

I also very much agree with your suggested minimum system recommendations. I am far from a power user with unusual storage needs - but got 8 gb of memory and a 256 gb solid state drive. I am very happy with the way the new system handles things compared to my old XP system. Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 18,270,440 times
Reputation: 6728
Quote:
Originally Posted by rothbear View Post
As a retiree and being over 64, I think things should be a bit easier if they want us to keep up. About 2 years ago I bought a Lenovo laptop with 8.1. My unit automatically upgraded to 10 (without my approval) several months ago...
There's a way to prevent updates from being installed automatically - even in Windows 10 - as you found out.

I totally agree with you about how the defaults should be set. Like don't upgrade. Unless asked to and agreed to.

FWIW - I didn't order any security software on my computer - or pay for any. But still found some crummy McAfee stuff pre-installed when I set things up. Don't know exactly how I'll deal with it at this point (too early to tell). Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 06:08 PM
 
1,080 posts, read 830,757 times
Reputation: 627
Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaDL View Post
I upgraded both my desktop and laptop from windows 7 to windows 10 last month. Except for an unknown glitch which caused the Start menu on my laptop to disappear, windows 10 has been stable with faster bootup and shutdown than windows 7.

For whatever reason, microsoft windows versions have been alternating between a horrid, unstable one then a good one. I hanged on to windows XP on an old tablet, and had to put up with windows vista on my desktop for a while. At work, we stayed with XP until windows 7 come along. I also upgraded my desktop to windows 7 as soon as it was available.

Last year, I decided to get a refurbished Lenovo laptop so that I could have windows 7 professional instead of putting up with windows 8 on a new one.

My experience of helping friends and relatives to troubleshoot computer problems (both hardware and software) for years is that desktops from major companies (Lenovo, HP and Dell) are quite reliable. For laptops, Lenovo seems to be the most reliable. Tech supports from all these major companies are acceptable.

I typically don't buy PC and electronic stuffs from brick and mortar places. For people who are not tech savvy, I think it's better to buy from local stores (best buy, staples etc) to get the direct support. Online support could be frustrating at times.

I'm glad that microsoft offered free upgrade to windows 10 with the option to rollback to previous operating system.

Windows 10 is definitely a much better version than windows 8.

So I agree with Robyn that now is a good time to upgrade your computers.
i won't buy any pre made pc no more there to propritary for my blood. your much better off builing your own you know what's going in it and you know what you can do with it. along with better warranties and tech support than a pre made POS wich is mostly a year warranty and tech support
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Computers
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:16 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top