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Old 04-20-2018, 09:35 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
14,393 posts, read 21,082,505 times
Reputation: 23918

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Your deleted files wind up here.
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Old 04-20-2018, 11:47 PM
 
40,296 posts, read 41,850,213 times
Reputation: 16809
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanBev View Post
Thank you this is what I was asking.I just used Ccleaner will this accomplish what you are talking about.
This would be how law enforcement recovers files and why Hillary used chemical to destroy them?
Hillary didn't use she use a chemical, they used a program called bleachbit which is similar to what CCleaner will do. As much as I despise Hillary that story was overblown because it's standard procedure for drives you are discarding. Had they not done that they would have actually been negligent in their duties.

When you "delete" a file and then remove it from the trash bin that space on the drive is available for other data. When new data is stored in that space it is effectively gone. Programs like Bleachbit, CCleaner and others will write dummy data to that space. Note that the options for this is not on by default in CCleaner.

There is two ways to use CCleaner for wiping data. You can use it to wipe data when emptying the recycle bin, it will add a context menu item. With this option it will overwrite just the space the file occupied, this offers minimal security. For example if you open and saved the file multiple times when it was saved it may not have been saved to the same space so there could be multiple copies in unused space that will be there until they are overwritten by new data. CCleaner is not going to wipe the old copies.

The other way to use it is in conjunction with CCleaner's basic function which is to remove unneeded files. When you use CCleaner to remove old files there is option to wipe the free space. This will write dummy data to all the empty space on the disc. These two options used together are quite thorough but can still leave some data. One thing to note is this can take hours to complete.

If you are gong to discard the drive and want to be thorough there is a program called Dban you can download for free. This is booted from a CD/DVD disc and Windows never loads. This will start at the beginning of a drive and write data to the end, this wipes everything including Windows itself.

One final note, these programs should not be used on SSD drives for wiping data. SSD drives have built in functions for this and it will be performed by Windows periodically as normal function of the OS. For total secure deletion of an entire SSD drive you can boot into something like Knoppix from CD/DVD and send the command to the drive. It takes only seconds to wipe it.
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Old 04-24-2018, 07:14 PM
 
2,533 posts, read 6,519,722 times
Reputation: 2305
All of these posts are way over my head,I barely know how to use Win 7,I felt one hundred percent happy with ME and XP and was forced to go to Win 7 to do paperless tasks.
I have never had an interest in computers or modern technology.
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Old 04-24-2018, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,581 posts, read 55,510,434 times
Reputation: 32366
"Had they not done that they would have actually been negligent in their duties."

The system actually allowed me to rep you again! Yes, politics aside, there are protocols used in government and business to destroy data. Others can think of that when they see panel trucks with shredders next to a business .

As a geek, I loved the electron microscopy of a hard drive showing the rim of data left behind after a wipe, when the head had a slightly different path than the original write.
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Old 04-29-2018, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,728 posts, read 6,921,053 times
Reputation: 10477
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanley-88888888 View Post
hard drives are like closets.
if you take a shirt off a hanger and drop on the floor; the shirt still exists.

before i donate a pc i do something like:
dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda && dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sda
Useless. A *nix command isn't going to do him any good on a Win7 machine...and even if he had something similar, he clearly doesn't have the expertise to use it correctly, just like many people with the old DOS 'deltree' command...
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Old 04-29-2018, 03:27 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,915 posts, read 2,509,651 times
Reputation: 3152
^ live-usb's; it aint 'dat hard.
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Old 05-02-2018, 07:11 PM
 
7,199 posts, read 3,928,963 times
Reputation: 6808
Where do they go?

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Old 05-02-2018, 11:00 PM
 
28,648 posts, read 40,627,244 times
Reputation: 37346
That requires the version of Recuva you pay for.
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Old 05-03-2018, 01:51 AM
 
1,293 posts, read 452,537 times
Reputation: 2562
To actually answer the OP's question, yes they do "stack up" in a way. This is speaking for the "ordinary" way of deleting files (i.e. selecting files then doing shift+del), not any low-level deletion or secure method. When you delete a file you don't actually delete the file itself, you are simply telling the OS to remove the entry for the data in the file system (e.g. FAT32, EXT4, XFS etc.) after which the OS then treats as unallocated (writable) space on the disk. The file still remains physically on the disk until it's overwritten with new data, you just don't see it because it's been removed from the directory listing. This is also why "undelete" utilities like Recuva, to recover recently deleted files, work.

Most operting systems since probably time immemorial have done it this way because it's MUCH faster than actually blanking each sector the file is stored in.

(See guys? That wasn't so hard, was it?)
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Old 05-03-2018, 07:44 AM
 
40,296 posts, read 41,850,213 times
Reputation: 16809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ttark View Post

(See guys? That wasn't so hard, was it?)
Already explained twice, once by me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
When you "delete" a file and then remove it from the trash bin that space on the drive is available for other data. When new data is stored in that space it is effectively gone.
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