U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Computers
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-27-2018, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
25,402 posts, read 11,261,033 times
Reputation: 21391

Advertisements

I've ordered a new tower from HP, customized.

This time around I'm going to hire someone to set it up for me.

I particularly want help transferring some programs from the old computer to the new computer.

I've already "chatted" with the guy and he also wants to reduce "bloatware". I know there is plenty of bloatware on new computers...should I let him do that? Any guidelines or suggestions?

Any other thoughts?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-27-2018, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
2,297 posts, read 3,491,828 times
Reputation: 3018
A friend of mine just purchased a new laptop. She had this OLD MacBook and was scared of the same efforts.
Installing on the new machine all the stuff on her old, echoing it's data and what customizations that could be done.

She went on NextDoor.com (rather than CraigsList, so it'd be restricted it to those within a few miles of her), and listed a "Wanted to Hire: Geek-for-a-Day".
She sifted through about 5 respondents and found a computer enthusiast (IE: hard-core geek) who offered a reasonable hourly rate. She met him at a local coffee shop for about 3 hours with her new and old hardware and he did all she needed, while she looked over his shoulder.
She was very happy with that, and even paid for a 2nd meeting to add a few new programs she had been contemplating, plus a few old-program tweaks. Again, very happy.
Of course, this is very dependent on you doing a good screening of The Geek.

More specifically:
I'd agree to the Bloatware removal (with enthusiasm).
Also do (or ask your Guy to do) a Burn In. That is where you take an electronic device and have it run test programs for 2-3 days, so it's under a very heavy load. Electronics tent to fail under load within the first few days, or then only after years. So do the Burn In while it's still easy to return for a factory replacement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2018, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,727 posts, read 6,919,321 times
Reputation: 10477
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
...I particularly want help transferring some programs from the old computer to the new computer.

I've already "chatted" with the guy and he also wants to reduce "bloatware". I know there is plenty of bloatware on new computers...should I let him do that? Any guidelines or suggestions?

Any other thoughts?
Unlike the Good Old Days of DOS, and (in some cases) Win 3.1, you generally cannot simply 'transfer' programs from one machine to another. The programs must be installed on the new machine using the original media, data files...assuming they are stored in a manner separate from the program itself...can then be transferred. Settings may or may not be stored in a manner that allows them to be transferred/exported/imported, in a 'worst case' scenario you might have to go through the process of manually setting up any customizations to your preference.

Ya, get rid of any bloatware you don't want. I find that a lot of manufacturers include a whole bunch of crap in which I have no interest, including stuff that runs on startup and consumes resources that I would prefer to have available for other purposes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2018, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
25,402 posts, read 11,261,033 times
Reputation: 21391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zymer View Post
Unlike the Good Old Days of DOS, and (in some cases) Win 3.1, you generally cannot simply 'transfer' programs from one machine to another. The programs must be installed on the new machine using the original media, data files...assuming they are stored in a manner separate from the program itself...can then be transferred. Settings may or may not be stored in a manner that allows them to be transferred/exported/imported, in a 'worst case' scenario you might have to go through the process of manually setting up any customizations to your preference.

Ya, get rid of any bloatware you don't want. I find that a lot of manufacturers include a whole bunch of crap in which I have no interest, including stuff that runs on startup and consumes resources that I would prefer to have available for other purposes.
Then what is this?:
"However, Microsoft has partnered with Laplink to bring you PCmover Express—a tool for transferring selected files, folders, and more from your old Windows PC to your new Windows 10 PC." It claims that "Instead of repurchasing and manually reinstalling the programs from your old PC, use PCmover Professional. Transfer the selected applications to your new PC, installed and ready to use. PCmover; the fast and easy solution for migrating your files, settings, profiles, and applications PC to PC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2018, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,849 posts, read 13,973,633 times
Reputation: 8083
"Transfer Selected Applications"

Yea, so it will transfer Candy Crush for you but it certainly is NOT going to transfer Microsoft Office.

What Applications do you want moved to the new PC?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2018, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
25,402 posts, read 11,261,033 times
Reputation: 21391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
"Transfer Selected Applications"

Yea, so it will transfer Candy Crush for you but it certainly is NOT going to transfer Microsoft Office.

What Applications do you want moved to the new PC?
Good question. But that's why I decided to hire someone to do it for me. I just don't wanna struggle though it. Let an expert figure it out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2018, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,849 posts, read 13,973,633 times
Reputation: 8083
I just hate to see people waste money on this type of stuff. We could have walked you through it for FREE.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2018, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
11,341 posts, read 17,879,937 times
Reputation: 28828
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
I just hate to see people waste money on this type of stuff. We could have walked you through it for FREE.
Computer set up guys gotta eat too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2018, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,849 posts, read 13,973,633 times
Reputation: 8083
LOL True, true.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2018, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,727 posts, read 6,919,321 times
Reputation: 10477
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Then what is this?:
"However, Microsoft has partnered with Laplink to bring you PCmover Express—a tool for transferring selected files, folders, and more from your old Windows PC to your new Windows 10 PC." It claims that "Instead of repurchasing and manually reinstalling the programs from your old PC, use PCmover Professional. Transfer the selected applications to your new PC, installed and ready to use. PCmover; the fast and easy solution for migrating your files, settings, profiles, and applications PC to PC.
Note that I said "simply"...if you dig into the description, you will see that PCmoverExpress transfers only files, data, settings, and user profiles, it does not transfer applications- for that you would have to purchase PCmover Professional.

In the GODOD, you could very simply copy the directory in which a program was stored from one machine to another, and everything would be there. You'd type in the program start command and it would work just as it did before. Windows is not that simple, especially when it comes to Registry entries.

Even with Win3.1, .ini files controlled much of the functionality...but the introduction of the Registry with Win95 changed that...simply copying a program from one machine to another was no longer sufficient. This change made it 'inconvenient' to simply copy a program and have it work as it did before- now you had to spend more money, or time and effort to accomplish the desired result.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Computers
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:28 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top