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Old 05-06-2018, 10:04 PM
 
196 posts, read 82,287 times
Reputation: 170

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I am currently interested in learning coding programming, I just don't know where to start. I am a beginner. I found some sites online that teach you for a monthly fee, but I have no one to verify if they are worth my money. I was told python, C, C++ to start, but then again I'm not too sure. And I'm not too sure of the free programming sites either.

Majoring, maybe in computer science, if I like it, and can do it. I'll like any and all information you guys can share with me, thank you.
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Old 05-07-2018, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Plymouth Meeting, PA.
4,265 posts, read 2,157,663 times
Reputation: 2024
youtube has plenty of tutorials for free. C/C++ are very difficult languages to pick up especially if you do not understand Obect Oriented Concepts (OOP) in the case of C++.
when I was in college, we used paschal because it was geared to beginners and trying to switch to C/C++ was not easy.
Perhaps Python, Javacscript or Ruby might be a good place to start for todays beginners. Pascal would be a good choice although it doesn't do fancy web stuff but can set the foundations. You might be able to get a free compiler for it online somewhere and there is a OOP version called delphi.
good luck to you!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike2017 View Post
I am currently interested in learning coding programming, I just don't know where to start. I am a beginner. I found some sites online that teach you for a monthly fee, but I have no one to verify if they are worth my money. I was told python, C, C++ to start, but then again I'm not too sure. And I'm not too sure of the free programming sites either.

Majoring, maybe in computer science, if I like it, and can do it. I'll like any and all information you guys can share with me, thank you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2018, 09:19 AM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,920 posts, read 2,511,124 times
Reputation: 3152
not really programming, more like building blox; but, maybe start with scratch to get the maths down (like boolean logic, conditional logic, order of operations, ...)

then maybe get into bash programming. (run it off a linux live-usb to start).

do programs like: hello world
then learn to prompt variable substitution: what is your name -- hello <name>
then learn to loop to the beginning: for name in *; do hello <name>
then learn file-io: while read names.lst; do hello <name>
...

then maybe translate the above to c, c++, python, php, ...
then learn to do something practical like setup a lamp server ?
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Old 05-07-2018, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Florida
4,637 posts, read 3,969,190 times
Reputation: 4504
I would try and find a text book and work on your own to see how well you do.

There are free University courses on many topic so search for those. The whole course is free. You may also find colleges that you will recognize their name giving you free courses. I once took a course from Harvard that was a video of a class for credit. You could also take the course for credit over the internet or take the course for free and receive no credit.
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Old 05-07-2018, 04:09 PM
 
Location: USA
701 posts, read 994,547 times
Reputation: 651
The world of computer programming is so wide now and with so many FREE resources. There's really no reason to pay for beginner lessons. Sure, when you really get into it, or if your employer is paying for it, go pay for it. But if you just want to know if you'll actually like computer programming .....

Everyone learns differently. So you're going to get all sorts of advise on how to learn.

Look for a "learning track".

Online learning -
https://www.edx.org/course/introduct...olute-beginner
https://www.edx.org/course/introduct...n-fundamentals
https://www.edx.org/course/introduct...itx-6-00-1x-11
https://www.edx.org/course?subject=Computer%20Science

If you like Microsoft - https://mva.microsoft.com/

Or IBM - https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/l...o-java-course/

Javascript - http://javascriptissexy.com/how-to-l...ript-properly/

Now, after throwing that at you ..... I suggest to pick one (Python, Java, Javascript, C#) and study if for several months to a year. Stay on one track. It will get easier as your mind gets used to it.

While not really "computer programming" per se, I know several people who have made a career being "power users" of Microsoft Office products - Excel, BI, Access, Sharepoint, Powerpoint, Outlook, etc....
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Old 05-08-2018, 01:08 PM
 
196 posts, read 82,287 times
Reputation: 170
Is Codecademy a legit site? Tutorials from KhanAcademy, Codecademy, Code.org legit? There is so much information and suggestions out in the web. I am thinking of buying a python book. Good idea or bad?
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Old 05-08-2018, 04:41 PM
 
2,914 posts, read 1,709,430 times
Reputation: 2988
If you're serious about learning to code, I'd look for a local class, community college maybe, or like our local makerspace. There's a real benefit to being able to interact in real time with an instructor and other learners. Some web approaches may offer this too. I don't know I learned a long time ago.

In my experience, learning to program involves two very different skill sets, both of which are important. One skill-set is learning how computer programs are structured to solve problems or do tasks. This is common among most all languages, things like conditional branched, input, output, logic operation, arithmetic, program control and so forth. The other part is learning the syntax of a new language - what the commands are called, what they do, what they contain, how they're organized and such.

What language you start with is less important, I think, than just starting to learn one, any one, so you learn to think like a programmer, and learn how to understand a programming language manual.
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Old 05-09-2018, 04:38 PM
 
Location: USA
701 posts, read 994,547 times
Reputation: 651
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike2017 View Post
Is Codecademy a legit site? Tutorials from KhanAcademy, Codecademy, Code.org legit? There is so much information and suggestions out in the web. I am thinking of buying a python book. Good idea or bad?
Yes, they're legit sites. I've taken the free courses at Codeacademy, among others. Beginner stuff, which sounds like where you're at. Some of my hot-shot developers learned on those years ago, before moving to better professional sites and learning on the job.

I was old school. Learned to program on Basic, Assembler, C then C++ decades ago. So I was used to books and manuals. That was all we had. These days, all my manuals are PDFs or ebooks. The thing with books, though, is that they're obsolete within a year. You want proof?

https://mva.microsoft.com/ebooks/

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/mss...-2013-sharepo/

So I don't buy books anymore. I've become dependent to online studying.

The reason I suggested finding a "learning track" is that, since you're a beginner, it would be nice to have a learning guide or track to follow. Those were the links I posted previously.

I haven't found an easy and FREE learning track for python. One of those I used to learn Python was at CodeAcademy and this: https://learnpythonthehardway.org/book/. (I didn't buy the book.)

I'm not an expert yet, since I stopped, due to work.

One caveat about learning python as first computing language - some people I know have said that python is one of the easiest languages to learn in programming. That's why it's taught in several colleges. But I've heard that when they moved on to other C-based language (C#, Java, Javascript, etc... ) they struggled a bit because python was so easy and elegant compared to the other languages.

Different strokes for different folks.

Also, join a forum like stackoverflow.com. Developer forum. Be a lurker. Immerse yourself in the lingo.

Eventually, if you find that you're not the programmer/developer type, explore data sciences or business intelligence. There's really big money in it. After all, there's a gajillion amount of data floating around the universe. Someone's got to make some sense out of it and make it useful.

I'd like that to be one of those people! That's why I'm studying that now.
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