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Old 08-07-2018, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
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We use O365 at work, too. I hope you're paying less then $25 a sea... ours is like half that.
Yea, there are definite use cases for business.
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Old 08-07-2018, 10:07 AM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
We use O365 at work, too. I hope you're paying less then $25 a sea... ours is like half that.
Yea, there are definite use cases for business.
We bought the 2016 version. I'm not sure what the pricing was back then. I may have misspoke on the $25. It is currently as $12.50 a month for a year so $150 a year. Almost the same as buying it. It's a no-brainer. With the 365 version you are guaranteed to always have the "latest" but with this kind of product, who cares? It's not like they can add too many more features that you actually need and want.

https://products.office.com/en-us/co...oducts-a?tab=2
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Old 08-07-2018, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,514 posts, read 16,536,277 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gguerra View Post
We bought the 2016 version. I'm not sure what the pricing was back then. I may have misspoke on the $25. It is currently as $12.50 a month for a year so $150 a year. Almost the same as buying it. It's a no-brainer. With the 365 version you are guaranteed to always have the "latest" but with this kind of product, who cares? It's not like they can add too many more features that you actually need and want.

https://products.office.com/en-us/co...oducts-a?tab=2
It is not.

It's $8.25/month, which is $100 per year. Most businesses are a little more above-board than individuals may be and thus are less likely to violate copyrights, thus making the cheapest version of Office 2016 $229 unless they're large enough to go through bulk licensing. While I might wing it and use the Home and Student version that's not licensed for commercial use, few business are going to do that.

The only reason to pay the $12.50/month for Premium is because your company uses things like Exchange, Teams, or SharePoint. Since they do and thus would be paying $60 per year anyway, you're actually looking at a cost of $90/year versus either $229 or $400 if your company uses Access. While individuals may not use Access, businesses often do. To some extent it's just ease of use. Rather than buying Professional at $400 for people that need Access and Home & Business at $229, a company may just choose to buy all Professional licenses. That way if someone moves around within the company and into a role that does use Access they don't need to manage which installation each employee has.

Whether or not there is anything important really depends on how you use it. Office 2013 and especially 2016 the main differences have been in collaboration. If you're working as a team on a document, Office 2016 is just much better than Office 2013 as 2013 has only very rudimentary collaboration built into it. The differences between Office 365 (and the upcoming Office 2019) and Office 2016 are more modest. If you're not, honestly you can still get by just fine with Office 2010. 2016 doesn't have better security and data retention but outside co-authoring there's really nothing in Office 2016 that 2010 just fundamentally is incapable of doing.
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Old 08-07-2018, 12:10 PM
 
28,619 posts, read 40,594,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Yeah, I guess if you don't know the price of leasing O365 vs buying Office 2016 it is.

You can lease Office 365 for a single users for $70/yr or for 5 users for $100/year.
You can buy Office 2016 for $149-$400 per user depending on which version of Office 2016 you're talking about.

If you just need one install and don't need Access, which most people don't, Office 365 is poor value versus Office 2016. If you need multiple installs and/or need Access and/or like the things like One Drive that comes with 365, leasing is more attractive. Regardless, you can just buy Office 2016 (or 2019 soon) instead of leasing 365 if you have principals where you'd rather spend more money to buy the software than lease it or it's less expensive for your needs to buy it than lease. That makes perfect sense to me. What doesn't make sense is saying you'd boycott Windows if they offered a lease option while saying you'd buy Office 2016 even though there's a lease option for Office with Office 365.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
If you just need one install and don't need Access, which most people don't, Office 365 is poor value versus Office 2016.
Once again the problem is a confusing post. You throw so much information on the page in one solid paragraph that it's hard to read, and half the information gets lost in the mix.

In the future I'll not respond to posts like this.
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Old 08-07-2018, 12:16 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
It is not.

It's $8.25/month, which is $100 per year. Most businesses are a little more above-board than individuals may be and thus are less likely to violate copyrights, thus making the cheapest version of Office 2016 $229 unless they're large enough to go through bulk licensing. While I might wing it and use the Home and Student version that's not licensed for commercial use, few business are going to do that.

The only reason to pay the $12.50/month for Premium is because your company uses things like Exchange, Teams, or SharePoint. Since they do and thus would be paying $60 per year anyway, you're actually looking at a cost of $90/year versus either $229 or $400 if your company uses Access. While individuals may not use Access, businesses often do. To some extent it's just ease of use. Rather than buying Professional at $400 for people that need Access and Home & Business at $229, a company may just choose to buy all Professional licenses. That way if someone moves around within the company and into a role that does use Access they don't need to manage which installation each employee has.

Whether or not there is anything important really depends on how you use it. Office 2013 and especially 2016 the main differences have been in collaboration. If you're working as a team on a document, Office 2016 is just much better than Office 2013 as 2013 has only very rudimentary collaboration built into it. The differences between Office 365 (and the upcoming Office 2019) and Office 2016 are more modest. If you're not, honestly you can still get by just fine with Office 2010. 2016 doesn't have better security and data retention but outside co-authoring there's really nothing in Office 2016 that 2010 just fundamentally is incapable of doing.
We didn't buy the Office all at once and paid anywhere from $175 to $209. Even at the $100 a year for 365, it's better (for us) to just buy it. I just don't like the subscription based model. Call me old fashioned or whatever. Even 2007 or 2010 would have sufficed in our situation. Compatibility is our main concern, not fancy features. The .xlsx and .docx formats have been around since 2007 version. The new (larger) PST format has been around since 2003. Other than that, as far as we are concerned they all serve the same purpose. The only reason for us to even buy it (again) is when we update hardware.

I tried to convert people to using a free solution like Libre. For the most part that would have been fine EXCEPT for outlook. There just isn't anything comparable that is free. We deal in large amounts of email with tons of attachments plus since we have been using it for years it's kind of hard to change. Outlook was the deal breaker for us.
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Old 08-07-2018, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,514 posts, read 16,536,277 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
Well, first of all we were talking about Windows here... not Office 365. I'm not paying an annual fee to use my computer that I paid $700 for. Do you get that principle? If MS wants to charge me a monthly or annual fee TO USE MY PC: yes, I will switch to Linux.
As to the O365 discussion, there is no use case scenario in my personal or professional life that makes O365 a better buy then either a one time purchase of Word-Excel-PPT or using a FREE alternative, like Libre.
No.

If we ever get to the point where Microsoft REQUIRES you to pay a monthly fee to use Windows I would understand that. But that's not what's being talked about at all. While Microsoft would really prefer that individuals pay a subscription fee to use Office 365 rather than buy Office 2016, it's not like they require it. Office 2016 is still offered and that's not changing at least through Office 2019. Clearly Microsoft would much rather you pay the subscription and pretty aggressively designs their website to steer people to Office 365 and away from Office 2016. None the less, it is not a requirement. The scope of managed desktop environments is far, far smaller than the scope for Office 365 versus Office 2016. Possibly it will get there in 2025 or something. I doubt it but it's possible.

As to there being no use case in your personal scenario for Office 365 being a better buy, that's understandable. If you're not using Access, which most individuals are not, and only need a single installation, and don't care to pay for lots of cloud storage space, it's very hard to look at a $70/year subscription and get excited about that versus just buying it for $149.

Your personal use case, however, is not everyone's. Effectively O365 is $10/year as there's nothing in Business Essentials I care about other than One Drive which comes with 0365. Before that I was spending $120/month for Google Drive anyway. I do miss the transfer speeds with Google Drive. On the other hand, Google Drives versioning at least then was awful so I spent a lot of time cleaning up after it to keep it from crashing or creating 500 copies of the same file.
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Old 08-07-2018, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,514 posts, read 16,536,277 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gguerra View Post
We didn't buy the Office all at once and paid anywhere from $175 to $209. Even at the $100 a year for 365, it's better (for us) to just buy it. I just don't like the subscription based model. Call me old fashioned or whatever. Even 2007 or 2010 would have sufficed in our situation. Compatibility is our main concern, not fancy features. The .xlsx and .docx formats have been around since 2007 version. The new (larger) PST format has been around since 2003. Other than that, as far as we are concerned they all serve the same purpose. The only reason for us to even buy it (again) is when we update hardware.

I tried to convert people to using a free solution like Libre. For the most part that would have been fine EXCEPT for outlook. There just isn't anything comparable that is free. We deal in large amounts of email with tons of attachments plus since we have been using it for years it's kind of hard to change. Outlook was the deal breaker for us.
There's no reason to buy a new copy when you upgrade hardware. I've had Office 2010 on two desktops and at least two laptops over the years. When I moved from Google Drive to O365, I just moved Office 2010 back to my desktop while my laptop now has O365. Provided it's a retail license it's transferable from computer to computer. OEM licenses are not, which is why I don't buy OEM licenses.

The major issue with the alternatives is interoperability. Things may have improved. I haven't used OO.o since before the fork to Apache and Libre but it was a mess back then. Basic text mostly worked okay but not much beyond that. Calc was a mess. Even among the alternatives which mostly use ODF formatting you had formatting issues back then. Admittedly, that was quite a while ago and things may well have improved.

Last edited by Malloric; 08-07-2018 at 01:03 PM..
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Old 08-07-2018, 01:04 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
3,972 posts, read 2,614,010 times
Reputation: 4741
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
There's no reason to buy a new copy when you upgrade hardware. I've had Office 2010 on two desktops and at least two laptops over the years. When I moved from Google Drive to O365, I just moved Office 2010 back to my desktop while my laptop now has O365. Provided it's a retail license it's transferable from computer to computer. OEM licenses are not, which is why I don't buy OEM licenses.
I knew that already and no it wasn't retail. We also didn't pay retail prices for it and didn't buy new versions of office till our most recent hardware purchases. In this case we did buy retail and should be covered. We don't refresh hardware very often around here anyway but it should not be an issue anymore.
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Old 08-07-2018, 06:33 PM
 
1,442 posts, read 2,571,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
No.

If we ever get to the point where Microsoft REQUIRES you to pay a monthly fee to use Windows I would understand that. But that's not what's being talked about at all.
Read the original post, that is exactly whats being talked about.
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Old 08-07-2018, 07:31 PM
 
1,299 posts, read 870,447 times
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I would switch to Linux in a heartbeat if I didn’t need robust video and audio editing software that is not available. Need After Effects, Samplitude. My Choices are severely limited with Linux.

But as far as the thread, I don’t lease software the same way I would never lease a car. It ensures a monthly payment for the rest of my life. I would rather pay upfront and not worry about budgeting it on at a later time.
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