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Old 08-12-2018, 11:36 AM
 
942 posts, read 618,075 times
Reputation: 151

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Recently, my laptop failed to reboot, and I had to go through factory reset. That is a lot of pains (losing files, programs, setting, etc).

To avoid same thing happen, I have partition C drive, and make a separate D drive to window system backup. I have also gone to Control Panel and create a system image in the drive.

Now what else I need to do? If the system fails again, and does it guaranteed that D drive is visible when restoring the system? I mean how to add hard drive partition to boot menu?

Thanks.
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Old 08-12-2018, 12:29 PM
 
28,619 posts, read 40,594,929 times
Reputation: 37291
You need an external back up. If the drive fails you won't have access to any of the work you just did. External hard drive, USB, etc.
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Old 08-13-2018, 11:00 AM
 
295 posts, read 232,761 times
Reputation: 386
Multiple partitions on the same drive will not help in the event of a drive failure. It's really only useful for easier file management by storing files of similar type in each partition. A system restore (factory reset) may even wipe out these partitions as it tries to restore everything back to the factory state.


Backup to a separate drive or external drive. If it's really critical data then back up to cloud storage as well.
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Old 08-14-2018, 12:52 AM
 
Location: Jakarta
68 posts, read 24,049 times
Reputation: 85
Install Deep Freeze, A restore software for Windows.
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Old 08-14-2018, 01:02 AM
 
40,212 posts, read 41,799,403 times
Reputation: 16755
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlebeH View Post
Recently, my laptop failed to reboot, and I had to go through factory reset. That is a lot of pains (losing files, programs, setting, etc).

Unless the disk is physically damaged/inoperable there is no reason to lose files unless they were corrupted somehow which is highly unlikely. Even when a disk physically fails recovery is possible in most cases with enough money.



Those files you lost may still be present if they haven't been overwritten yet. You can try this software to recover them .

https://www.ccleaner.com/recuva
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Old 08-15-2018, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
25,168 posts, read 18,661,858 times
Reputation: 29684
A physical drive can fail.

Back in the early 2000s, I ran a couple of drives in a RAID 0 array. One drive failed, I lost it all. At the time, I had no backups. Scheduled backups were doable then, but I didn't know enough about it to do so.

I had a 4TB WD Green Drive and a 2.5" Samsung 850 Pro SSD sitting on my desk in a cage. 18 year old cat knocks the cage off the desk tonight. The two disks in the cage land right side up. The 4TB HDD is operable, barely. It's taken over two hours to get 21GB of ROMS off it. It will be going all night. I can hear the disk struggling. The SSD is probably fine.

If you want true backups, I'd have a storage drive, a physical backup to that onsite, and an offsite or cloud backup for the most critical data. You don't want to lose everything in a disk-based failure, accident like the cat knocking the array off the desk, fire, etc. Cloud storage is cheap and easy now.
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Old 08-16-2018, 01:13 PM
 
28,619 posts, read 40,594,929 times
Reputation: 37291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
A physical drive can fail.

Back in the early 2000s, I ran a couple of drives in a RAID 0 array. One drive failed, I lost it all. At the time, I had no backups. Scheduled backups were doable then, but I didn't know enough about it to do so.

I had a 4TB WD Green Drive and a 2.5" Samsung 850 Pro SSD sitting on my desk in a cage. 18 year old cat knocks the cage off the desk tonight. The two disks in the cage land right side up. The 4TB HDD is operable, barely. It's taken over two hours to get 21GB of ROMS off it. It will be going all night. I can hear the disk struggling. The SSD is probably fine.

If you want true backups, I'd have a storage drive, a physical backup to that onsite, and an offsite or cloud backup for the most critical data. You don't want to lose everything in a disk-based failure, accident like the cat knocking the array off the desk, fire, etc. Cloud storage is cheap and easy now.

As a realtor will tell you; location, location, location.
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Old 08-16-2018, 02:33 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
3,972 posts, read 2,614,010 times
Reputation: 4741
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlebeH View Post
Recently, my laptop failed to reboot, and I had to go through factory reset. That is a lot of pains (losing files, programs, setting, etc).

To avoid same thing happen, I have partition C drive, and make a separate D drive to window system backup. I have also gone to Control Panel and create a system image in the drive.

Now what else I need to do? If the system fails again, and does it guaranteed that D drive is visible when restoring the system? I mean how to add hard drive partition to boot menu?

Thanks.
Haven't even seen the OP check or post back but here it is anyway.

I think he wants to dual boot from either C: or D:?

Why anyone would want to do this is beyond me. Some of these are not free. Look under "Programs for Multi-Booting"

Boot Managers & Disk Utilities

I will also repeat what others have said, that if the drive fails, you will still be SOL. You need to do image backups to a separate device to ensure your data is safe.

You could also do the same using diskpart and edit the boot.ini file.
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Old 08-17-2018, 07:30 PM
 
2,360 posts, read 1,287,624 times
Reputation: 2093
would invest in ssd/hyrbid external and use norton ghost to replicate your HD.
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