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Old 08-26-2018, 12:25 PM
 
Location: NYC
13,822 posts, read 9,307,455 times
Reputation: 15276

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As a long time IT security consultant, I would never put my personal data on the cloud. It is far easier to hack and accessed by criminals and government than having my data offline.

The cloud is nothing but another fancy term for datacenter or mainframe systems for older folks. The only difference is how quickly data can move around and get retrieved.

Majority of folks that I've met can keep their personal data in a very durable storage device but instead people do the cheapest and laziest thing which is keeping their data on their PCs or laptop that can be easily lost or stolen.

Just about every company uses the cloud as quicker computing resource and not as their primarily place of data storage. That is just foolish to put all your eggs in one basket.
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Old 08-26-2018, 12:44 PM
 
577 posts, read 301,004 times
Reputation: 757
I was lucky enough to go to a high school in the 70’s that had an IBM 1620 (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_1620) to play with. It had a sci-fi looking console with switches and lights that flashed as your Fortan program loaded and executed. They also had some kind of teletype terminal time sharing system (maybe HP?) where you stored your programs on a punched tape paper roll.

A little later in college we had an IBM mainframe somewhere and you submitted your programs on punch cards, they run the job whenever, and you pick up the output the next day, just to find out you had a typo error. They also had a dail-up timesharing system if you had your own terminal or computer. At the time all of the programming and computer related classes were offered by the Math department, they didn’t even have a computer science department yet.

All of this got me interested in programming so in 1981 I got my father to lend me $2000 to buy my first real computer, an Osborne 1 (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osborne_1). This was running CP/M, before MS DOS took over. Looking back now this was an investment that helped create a 35 year career in programming. I remember my Mom after I got my first job gently reminding me that “you know your father expects you to pay him back”. I still have that Osborne 1 in a box in the attic.
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Old 08-26-2018, 12:59 PM
 
1,293 posts, read 452,901 times
Reputation: 2567
Quote:
What was the name of another web browser besides Netscape. I can't remember now.
NCSA Mosaic
Lynx (text-only interface)

There were a few others but Mosaic, Netscrape and Exploiter were the main ones at the time. I think Opera might have also been getting started around then but it was mostly unknown.


Quote:
The QWERTY Keyboard was invented in 1868.....isn't it about time we moved on. The hyperbolic increase in Carpal Tunnel Surgeries should have been our first clue.






The QWERTY keyboard survives today mainly because of tradition, little else. People are resistant to change. QWERTY was designed as a workaround to the limitations of mechanical typewriter linkages of the day, to effectively slow typists down so as to avoid jamming the type bars (which still frequently happened, so feel free to judge the effectiveness of this method. D'erp). There are no mechanical type elements in computer keyboards so such a layout is unnecessary, yet it persists because it's what most people are familiar with. Ergonomic layouts do exist (e.g. the Dvorak layouts) but they remain fairly obscure and presently are limited to a small group of enthusiasts.


Quote:
1 MEG. 1,024,000 bytes






1 024 768 bytes, unless you were accounting solely for user space (not including file system overhead).
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Old 08-26-2018, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
1,465 posts, read 836,097 times
Reputation: 2589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ttark View Post
NCSA Mosaic
Lynx (text-only interface)

There were a few others but Mosaic, Netscrape and Exploiter were the main ones at the time. I think Opera might have also been getting started around then but it was mostly unknown.





The QWERTY keyboard survives today mainly because of tradition, little else. People are resistant to change. QWERTY was designed as a workaround to the limitations of mechanical typewriter linkages of the day, to effectively slow typists down so as to avoid jamming the type bars (which still frequently happened, so feel free to judge the effectiveness of this method. D'erp). There are no mechanical type elements in computer keyboards so such a layout is unnecessary, yet it persists because it's what most people are familiar with. Ergonomic layouts do exist (e.g. the Dvorak layouts) but they remain fairly obscure and presently are limited to a small group of enthusiasts.




1 024 768 bytes, unless you were accounting solely for user space (not including file system overhead).
Of course, user space.

My beef isn't with the layout of the keyboard. I want to finally do away with the keyboard interface altogether. Hence, my question about Voice Recognition software.

Captain James T. Kirk : Computer.

Disembodied Voice : Yes Captain.
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Old 08-26-2018, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
40,083 posts, read 49,005,949 times
Reputation: 112190
Quote:
Originally Posted by slackercruster View Post
My ancient Windows 7 runs better than my Windows 10. We didn't get ransomware back in the day either. I get ransomware ever few months. Sometimes 2 in a week.
Yep. My wife has 10 and nothing but problems, I still have the 7 and never a problem. Us old folks really don't need all that fancy dancy stuff.
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Old 08-26-2018, 06:31 PM
 
2,150 posts, read 2,181,427 times
Reputation: 3661
My first job out of college was with Burroughs Corp in 1975 where I met my husband. After we married, I left, he stayed. He brought home a Burroughs PC which we got with an employee discount around 1983. That was our first home PC. The first game I remember on that P C was Leisure Suit Larry. It was automated and that was a big deal. Larry would be dancing and toss his partner up in the air and she'd disappear. I can't recall how you'd "win". Anyone else remember?
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Old 08-28-2018, 06:30 PM
 
Location: SF, CA
1,635 posts, read 778,486 times
Reputation: 2603
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenk893 View Post
No where things should have stopped was in 2001 with Windows XP. It was so easy and SIMPLE to use with basic graphics and interface yet still modern and good looking. Then came along Windows Vista and that's when things went to crap.
Vista had a terrible reputation. Seven is quite good. Eight - I hadn't known there was an 8! Was it another fiasco? Ten is a mess... graphics everywhere, but you can't find what you're looking for.

For all its wealth, Microsoft has been thoroughly inept at reinventing the wheel.
Maybe it's time they stopped trying.
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Old 08-29-2018, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,853 posts, read 13,978,818 times
Reputation: 8083
Quote:
Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
Agree 100%. This new fangled equipment has been a boondoggle ever since we got it.
New fangled?!? Boondoggle?? Any guesses as to this posters age?

Quote:
Originally Posted by NW4me
Ten is a mess... graphics everywhere, but you can't find what you're looking for.
I guess I will be the defender of the modern technology. For the record I am not a, as wit-nit would probably say, whipper snapper. (Good hearted teasing wit-nit, I am not making fun of you).

Windows 10... and you can't find what you are looking for?!?! Nonsense. It has NEVER been easier on a Windows PC to find what you are looking for.

Want to change Mouse sensitivity?
WinXP: Click Start then Control Panel, find Mouse, open that.
Win 10: Click Start, type MOUSE, press enter.
Done.

The system wide SEARCH settings introduced in 8 and perfected in 10 have changed my life. In both Windows and MS Office.
Todays task manager is so far advanced beyond XP I would switch to Apple before I went back to XP.

RE: Social Media. Yes, it is so easy to rail against these intrusive sites. And yes, there's a ton of drivel on it. But it can be useful.
My parents both died when I was pretty young. So I never got much in the way of family history. A few years after Facebook got big I wound my way through some facebook rabbit hole, quite accidentally, and found 2 sisters and a brother I didn't know I had living in Georgia (dad married before and I didn't know).
So no one is going to tell me Facebook sucks.

As to Hardware???

MMMM BABY! So glad I am still around for these beautiful games.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R22hGCi2NAM
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Old 08-29-2018, 11:25 AM
 
28,648 posts, read 40,627,244 times
Reputation: 37346
Quote:
Originally Posted by FiveLoaves View Post
Captain James T. Kirk : Computer.

Disembodied Voice : Yes Captain.
Me: Hey Google?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
MMMM BABY! So glad I am still around for these beautiful games.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R22hGCi2NAM
Cut my teeth on Wolfenstein 3D.

Then games like Spear of Destiny, Doom, the list is long.

First computer besides the ones like the Atari 400?

IBM PC1 in November of 1981. No hard drive. No printer. Green composite monitor. 64k RAM. 5 1/2" floppy drive.

A little over $3000.00

I learned how to add hardware, memory, etc. Taught myself programming.

My wife played Wizardry.

We both ended up as techies.
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Old 08-29-2018, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,853 posts, read 13,978,818 times
Reputation: 8083
Wizardy... omg... Ask her if "Murphy's Ghost" rings a bell.
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