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Old 09-20-2018, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
25,340 posts, read 11,239,460 times
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Good idea or bad idea?

Why did you?

Were you satisfied?
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Old 09-20-2018, 02:17 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
3,972 posts, read 2,614,010 times
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Good idea, for added speed, yes I am satisfied.

Prices have come down quite a bit.
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Old 09-20-2018, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,825 posts, read 13,961,605 times
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No but I upgraded a dozen PC's with one. There's no downwside.
Windows reboot went from a minute and a half to 28 seconds.
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Old 09-20-2018, 02:56 PM
 
Location: USA
440 posts, read 126,796 times
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Way longer battery time too on laptops (more efficient) and run cooler!
Samsung EVO 850 or better are nice!
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Old 09-20-2018, 03:00 PM
 
4,367 posts, read 2,362,899 times
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This is a no brainer. Dead simple with Samsung SW and nothing but benefits. You will only wonder what took you so long.
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Old 09-20-2018, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
25,340 posts, read 11,239,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCCyou View Post
Way longer battery time too on laptops (more efficient) and run cooler!
Samsung EVO 850 or better are nice!
I wouldn't try to do it myself, but I was looking at the Samsung 860 EVO.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:13 PM
 
28,619 posts, read 40,594,929 times
Reputation: 37291
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
I wouldn't try to do it myself, but I was looking at the Samsung 860 EVO.
Depending on the laptop it can be simple or a pita.

Somewhere in these forums I wrote about upgrading both ours.

The Dell required one screw to be removed to gain access.

The HP was, iirc, 13 screws then the back had to pried off with a spudger.

Highly recommended upgrade.
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:42 PM
 
2,510 posts, read 2,522,497 times
Reputation: 3008
I upgraded my Samsung laptop with a 1TB SATA-bAsed SSD drive (Mushkin-brand) and had upgraded my earlier-owned MacBook Pro Mid-2009 laptop with a 1TB SATA-based SSD drive as well (Mushkin-brand) and later moved that SSD drive to a newer MacBook Pro Mid-2012 laptop (having taking apart the Mid-2009 model for varied spare parts and then trashing the laptop).

My experiences have taught me somethings about using SSD drives as the internal booting drive of a computer (and note that you ae hearing this from a many-decades computing and electronics techie): That is, simply installing an SSD drive in a laptop computer (or even in a desktop computer) as the booting drive isn't necessarily an assurance that everything will be measurably and consistently speedier. That is:

1. Your laptop (or desktop) must have a sufficient-enough CPU (say, at least an Intel i5 or equivalent AMD processor or better such as an Intel i7 . . . not just an Intel i3 or Pentium or Celeron or Atom processor and the like);

2. It is better to have at least 16GB of RAM installed rather than just 8 GB of RAM (and certainly not trying to get by with only 4 GB of RAM);

3. Some types of SSD drives of certain interfaces (e.g., M.2) are going to be notably speedier than, say SATA-based SSD drive . . . . . and, if SATA-based drives, SATA III (6 GB/s) will be much faster than SATA II (3 GB/s).


Some real-life examples to illustrate the above points:

1. My earlier-owned Mid-2009 MacBook Pro 13.3" laptop had an Intel Core 2 Duo processor (probably not much better than a Pentium or Celeron . . . not even as good as an Intel i3, which is not so good itself). It dragged ---- majorly. The laptop couldn't take more than 8GB of RAM. And the comptuer had a SATA II drive interface and had USB 2.0 ports instead of USB 3.0 ports. So even when replacing its spinning-platter hard drive with a 1TB SATA-based SSD drive, the machine was still too slow and draggy much of the time.

YET when I took that same SSD drive and moved it into a new (secondhand) Mid-2012 MacBook Pro 15.6" laptop (which has an Intel Quad-Core i7 processor, dual graphics processors built-in that work together at the same time [intel & NVidia graphics processors], a SATA III 6GB/s interface for the booting drive, and came with 8 GB of RAM but could be upgraded to 16GB of RAM if desired), the SSD drive went "ZOOOOOOOOOM" in speed and overall performance compared to being installed in the Mid-2009 MacBook Pro laptop. That is, the exact same SSD drive that was slow and draggy when installed in my Mid-2009 MacBook Pro was much much much much faster when installed in my Mid-2012 MacBook Pro (and it also makes a diffrence that, when Mac OS High Sierra sees that the booting drive is an SSD drive rather than a spinning-platter hard drive, it converts the drive's file system from HFS+ to the newer APFS [Apple File System] file system format . . . which is notably faster in overall throughput). And then I replaced the 8GB of RAM with 16GB of RAM and the performance of the computer went even notably faster. I can run Mac OS High Sierra and Windows 10 Pro (and other OS's such as Linux Mint all at the same time using "Parallels Desktop for Mac" and everything with the workability of the computer is fast and responsive at all or nearly all times.

2. Even my Samsung laptop (a 2011 model with an Intel i3 processor and a maximum of 8GB of RAM and likely has a SATA II 3 GB/s drive interface (deemed to be likely so by myself because the laptop also only comes with USB 2.0 ports instead of USB 3.0 and was designed to take a lower amount of memory such as 4GB, though I managed to install 8GB workably), when I installed a 1TB SATA-based SSD drive in place of the included spinning-platter hard drive, I hardly notice any difference in performance at all from when I had a 1TB spinning-platter hard drive installed instead.


IN SUMMARY: You see, it is probable that putting an SSD drive into a computer with sub-standard hardware won't present you with much of any difference in performance or, a best, a barely noticeable difference. Even an Intel i3 can drag (compared to an Intel i5 or i7 . . . or the latest i9) and dual-core CPUs have quite-measurably-lesser performance than quad-core CPUs.

BUT note that the only benefit of as SSD drive isn't just greater speed. It also runs cooler and takes up less power. And, just as important as speed enhancement, not having a spinning-platter hard drive but rather an SSD drive (being all electronic, with NO moving parts) means the laptop can be moved around, turned on its side, turned upside down, or even carried on your side like a paper notebook or looseleaf binder without having to worry about damaging or crashing or destroying the drive. Being all-electronic drives with no moving parts, SSD drives are NOT sensitive to such physical movements or jarring, unlike spinning-platter hard drives.

Last edited by UsAll; 09-20-2018 at 10:50 PM..
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Old 09-21-2018, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
25,340 posts, read 11,239,460 times
Reputation: 21386
Quote:
Originally Posted by UsAll View Post
I upgraded my Samsung laptop with a 1TB SATA-bAsed SSD drive (Mushkin-brand) and had upgraded my earlier-owned MacBook Pro Mid-2009 laptop with a 1TB SATA-based SSD drive as well (Mushkin-brand) and later moved that SSD drive to a newer MacBook Pro Mid-2012 laptop (having taking apart the Mid-2009 model for varied spare parts and then trashing the laptop).

My experiences have taught me somethings about using SSD drives as the internal booting drive of a computer (and note that you ae hearing this from a many-decades computing and electronics techie): That is, simply installing an SSD drive in a laptop computer (or even in a desktop computer) as the booting drive isn't necessarily an assurance that everything will be measurably and consistently speedier. That is:

1. Your laptop (or desktop) must have a sufficient-enough CPU (say, at least an Intel i5 or equivalent AMD processor or better such as an Intel i7 . . . not just an Intel i3 or Pentium or Celeron or Atom processor and the like);

2. It is better to have at least 16GB of RAM installed rather than just 8 GB of RAM (and certainly not trying to get by with only 4 GB of RAM);

3. Some types of SSD drives of certain interfaces (e.g., M.2) are going to be notably speedier than, say SATA-based SSD drive . . . . . and, if SATA-based drives, SATA III (6 GB/s) will be much faster than SATA II (3 GB/s).


Some real-life examples to illustrate the above points:

1. My earlier-owned Mid-2009 MacBook Pro 13.3" laptop had an Intel Core 2 Duo processor (probably not much better than a Pentium or Celeron . . . not even as good as an Intel i3, which is not so good itself). It dragged ---- majorly. The laptop couldn't take more than 8GB of RAM. And the comptuer had a SATA II drive interface and had USB 2.0 ports instead of USB 3.0 ports. So even when replacing its spinning-platter hard drive with a 1TB SATA-based SSD drive, the machine was still too slow and draggy much of the time.

YET when I took that same SSD drive and moved it into a new (secondhand) Mid-2012 MacBook Pro 15.6" laptop (which has an Intel Quad-Core i7 processor, dual graphics processors built-in that work together at the same time [intel & NVidia graphics processors], a SATA III 6GB/s interface for the booting drive, and came with 8 GB of RAM but could be upgraded to 16GB of RAM if desired), the SSD drive went "ZOOOOOOOOOM" in speed and overall performance compared to being installed in the Mid-2009 MacBook Pro laptop. That is, the exact same SSD drive that was slow and draggy when installed in my Mid-2009 MacBook Pro was much much much much faster when installed in my Mid-2012 MacBook Pro (and it also makes a diffrence that, when Mac OS High Sierra sees that the booting drive is an SSD drive rather than a spinning-platter hard drive, it converts the drive's file system from HFS+ to the newer APFS [Apple File System] file system format . . . which is notably faster in overall throughput). And then I replaced the 8GB of RAM with 16GB of RAM and the performance of the computer went even notably faster. I can run Mac OS High Sierra and Windows 10 Pro (and other OS's such as Linux Mint all at the same time using "Parallels Desktop for Mac" and everything with the workability of the computer is fast and responsive at all or nearly all times.

2. Even my Samsung laptop (a 2011 model with an Intel i3 processor and a maximum of 8GB of RAM and likely has a SATA II 3 GB/s drive interface (deemed to be likely so by myself because the laptop also only comes with USB 2.0 ports instead of USB 3.0 and was designed to take a lower amount of memory such as 4GB, though I managed to install 8GB workably), when I installed a 1TB SATA-based SSD drive in place of the included spinning-platter hard drive, I hardly notice any difference in performance at all from when I had a 1TB spinning-platter hard drive installed instead.


IN SUMMARY: You see, it is probable that putting an SSD drive into a computer with sub-standard hardware won't present you with much of any difference in performance or, a best, a barely noticeable difference. Even an Intel i3 can drag (compared to an Intel i5 or i7 . . . or the latest i9) and dual-core CPUs have quite-measurably-lesser performance than quad-core CPUs.

BUT note that the only benefit of as SSD drive isn't just greater speed. It also runs cooler and takes up less power. And, just as important as speed enhancement, not having a spinning-platter hard drive but rather an SSD drive (being all electronic, with NO moving parts) means the laptop can be moved around, turned on its side, turned upside down, or even carried on your side like a paper notebook or looseleaf binder without having to worry about damaging or crashing or destroying the drive. Being all-electronic drives with no moving parts, SSD drives are NOT sensitive to such physical movements or jarring, unlike spinning-platter hard drives.
Thank you for this.

Fortunately, my laptop is i7-4510U. My RAM is 12 GB.

Sounds like it should be beneficial...and cheaper than buying a new lap top.
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Old 09-21-2018, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Spring Hill, Florida
3,047 posts, read 5,035,634 times
Reputation: 3338
As so many others have said, an SSD upgrade will breathe new life into an aging laptop.

I've put an SSD in everything I own. I have an old HP laptop from 2012 that still performs well enough due to the speed boost from the SSD and the fact that I maxed out the RAM. My wife's laptop (an aging entry level AMD A4) now has an SSD and still works great for her needs.

Good luck!
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