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Old 07-24-2007, 12:42 PM
 
2 posts, read 7,278 times
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Default Modes of transportation

There is a possibility that my husband and I will be moving from Jersey City/NYC to Connecticut. Possible job in Bristol, CT. Looking at Hartford? I know its' a half-hour commute by car, but... We do NOT have a car. I know that there's public transportation...but is it good? We would like to avoid getting a car if possible. Leading to the big question...is it possible to get by without a car?
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Old 07-24-2007, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
14,153 posts, read 21,997,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DHudson View Post
I know that there's public transportation...but is it good? We would like to avoid getting a car if possible. Leading to the big question...is it possible to get by without a car?
No and not easily. Public transporation in central Connecticut is mostly buses and the routes are not designed for easy commuting between cities. Check CT Transit's routes and schedules to see how difficult it could be. Your husband might be able to get to work using a car or van pool as well (there are a lot of these, check Rideshare Company of Greater Hartford, Connecticut), but in general you would need a car to get to a lot of your destinations (grocery store, mall, movies, etc.) in the area. Jay
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Old 07-25-2007, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Ithaca NY
253 posts, read 621,841 times
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Agreed with JayCT. I was just talking about this with my family (who lives in CT); things are set up in a very car-assuming way. I wouldn't want to live carless in CT for very long.

That said, it is *possible* to do, if the bus routes are convenient. A few people my mom works with take the bus from Hartford or New Britain to Farmington. I expect it depends on the rotes.
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Old 07-25-2007, 11:43 AM
 
3,220 posts, read 3,906,865 times
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Something has got to be done to better the public transportation in CT somehow.

What happens when gasoline hits $5.00 plus a gallon and many people would not be able to afford to drive anymore and get to work?

DHudson - I hope that you'll both be able to find housing centrally located and within public transportation to your jobs.
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Old 07-25-2007, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
44 posts, read 250,088 times
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New Britain is closer to Bristol.

www.cttransit.com/content/routesNewBritain.asp (broken link)
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Old 07-25-2007, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
14,153 posts, read 21,997,615 times
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Originally Posted by njguy View Post
Something has got to be done to better the public transportation in CT somehow.

What happens when gasoline hits $5.00 plus a gallon and many people would not be able to afford to drive anymore and get to work?

DHudson - I hope that you'll both be able to find housing centrally located and within public transportation to your jobs.
The problem is that mass transit is very expensive and requires a very dense population to support it. That is why only major cities usually have mass-transit systems. Connecticut does not have the mass of people going from one area to another to support a system outside the New Haven to New York corridor. Even Shoreline East loses money. People also say that our highways cost us money, but they basically pay for themselves through the taxes we pay on gas and the fees related to owning a vehicle. Jay
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Old 08-08-2007, 05:22 AM
 
2 posts, read 7,278 times
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Thank you everyone! I appreciate all your responses!
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Old 08-08-2007, 10:53 AM
 
271 posts, read 885,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
The problem is that mass transit is very expensive and requires a very dense population to support it. That is why only major cities usually have mass-transit systems. Connecticut does not have the mass of people going from one area to another to support a system outside the New Haven to New York corridor. Even Shoreline East loses money. People also say that our highways cost us money, but they basically pay for themselves through the taxes we pay on gas and the fees related to owning a vehicle. Jay
Highway and motor vehicle-related taxes cover only part of the total costs of highways. Let us not forget highway maintenance, traffic regulation, parking, enforcement, etc.... The costs add up rather quickly and they are not all taken care of by taxes on gasoline.

And CT doesn't have a dense enough population to support mass transit????? Really??? The New Haven line is the commuter train with the highest ridership in the entire country. And don't think that they are all headed to Manhattan, a very large amount of riders are commuting to cities in CT(especially Stamford and Norwalk). If you look at southern New England(CT, MA, and RI) it is about the same size as Switzerland, a country that is covered by many train lines, but guess what???? The population of CT, MA, and RI is 50% denser than Switzerland!

CT needs more trains, better service, and more transit oriented development.
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Old 08-08-2007, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
14,153 posts, read 21,997,615 times
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Originally Posted by reason180 View Post
Highway and motor vehicle-related taxes cover only part of the total costs of highways. Let us not forget highway maintenance, traffic regulation, parking, enforcement, etc.... The costs add up rather quickly and they are not all taken care of by taxes on gasoline.

And CT doesn't have a dense enough population to support mass transit????? Really??? The New Haven line is the commuter train with the highest ridership in the entire country. And don't think that they are all headed to Manhattan, a very large amount of riders are commuting to cities in CT(especially Stamford and Norwalk). If you look at southern New England(CT, MA, and RI) it is about the same size as Switzerland, a country that is covered by many train lines, but guess what???? The population of CT, MA, and RI is 50% denser than Switzerland!

CT needs more trains, better service, and more transit oriented development.
Reason180 - I beg to differ with you, but the funding for all of the Connecticut Department of Transportation activities except the operation of Bradley Airport come from the Connecticut Special Transportation Fund. For the current fiscal year, the fund is expected to have $1.088 Billion in revenue of which 42% comes from motor fuel tax; 21% from moter vehicle receipts; 14% from License/Permits/Fees; 13% from Oil Company receipts; 6% from Moter vehicle sales tax; and 4% from interest in the account. Of ConDOT's $408.5 million budget, $208.9 million (or 51%) goes toward mass-transit including the operation of the New Haven Line of Metro-North, Shoreline East; various bus system operations and Dial-a-ride.

ConnDOT is very commited to mass-transit with the recent order to purchase 380 new railcars for the New HAven Line; $800 million for the New Haven Railyard rehab project; $450 million for the New Haven Line Catenary Replacement project (catenaries are the towners that support the electric power lines for the trains); $60 million to rehab existing railcars; $27 million to rehab the Shoreline East stations; $35 million for the new Fairfield railroad station; and a number of other smaller rail projects. The state has also committed to implementing commuter rail service between Springfield, MA, Hartford and New HAven by the year 2014. The required enviromental studies for that project are currently underway. There is also the New Britain-Hartford Busway project that is scheduled to begin construction next year and provide service by 2012.

You right that Connecticut does have the New Haven Line, but we were talking about implementing service in the Hartford area. The New Haven Line is a remnant of the old New Haven Railroad and is over 150 years old. It was established when there were a lot of people in one area (New Haven) that wanted to go to another area (New York). This was also true for the transportation of goods between these areas and major points in between. Since then, the area has been built up around this line, as well as away from it. The travel trends in that area are different than those in the Hartford area, which is more spread out.

It really is not density of the entire region that makes mass-transit less cost-effective, it is the need to have one large group of people going from one point to the other. You do not have that in the Hartford region. Also, the New Haven Line does not have the highest ridership in the country. That distinction belongs to the Long Island Railroad.

Let me just add that I agree with you that more has to be done to encourage people to use mass-transit, but this is very difficult. Steering development to mass-transit corridors is one way to do that, but it will take years to see any real change. In the mean time we need to balance our resources between all forms of transportation, Jay
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Old 08-08-2007, 02:27 PM
 
271 posts, read 885,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
ConnDOT is very commited to mass-transit ...

ConnDOT is very committed to mass-transit??????? Are you serious?? Mass-transit has been ignored for years and years that is why we are light years BEHIND other similar states like New Jersey.

I don't have time to write a proper response but I just want to highlight that you are ignoring all the money CT gets from the Federal government, mostly grants from the Federal Transit Administration. I'm not sure where you got those figures but it would be interesting to see the percentage of money allotted to mass-transit versus roads in ConnDOT during the 80's and 90's.
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