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Old 12-08-2018, 09:06 AM
 
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I would assume it be difficult to determine unless they were able to tranquilize the cat and collect data. Then tag and realise the beauty back into the wild.

I am glad if mountain lions are back. Heard the wolf population is starting to come back as well.

Balance man.
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Old 12-08-2018, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Northern Fairfield Co.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RunD1987 View Post
I would assume it be difficult to determine unless they were able to tranquilize the cat and collect data. Then tag and realise the beauty back into the wild.

I am glad if mountain lions are back. Heard the wolf population is starting to come back as well.

Balance man.
I think if a large cat was truly spotted in those woods, it would be easy to identify by sight as being a ML by someone with a trained eye. I understand bobcats are most commonly misidentified as a ML, but by someone who knows, it would be very hard to mix the two up. My understanding is bobcat is 35 lb range and a bobbed tail; ML is 100 lbs+, long tail — almost as long as it’s entire body and in the 7-8ft range nose to tail, and solid tan coat
But no details were provided about who reported the sighting. Without seeing a picture, I’d have to know who the spotter was before I deemed it credible. Example if spotter was a biologist, zoologist, or even avid hunter, then I would believe it to be credible. Anyone else though, not so much.
There was that one in Greenwich that was later hit by a car in Milford a number of years ago, so who knows. MAybe the just pass through our state occasionally.
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Old 12-08-2018, 07:41 PM
 
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My first assumption is also that people get a bit too excited by seeing a bobcat and want to believe it is a mountain lion. Same deal with coyotes being reported as wolves.

That being said, I think it's true that mistaking a bobcat for a mountain lion is unlikely for someone who knows about them.


Here is a site that shows a few confirmed pieces of evidence from the northeast.
https://www.cougarnet.org/confirmations
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Old 12-09-2018, 07:20 AM
 
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Mistaking a bobcat for a mountain lion is like mistaking a raccoon for a bear.
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Old 12-09-2018, 10:58 AM
 
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Saw a Lynx on my run once or thought was a Lynx

That was pretty cool
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Old 12-09-2018, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Connecticut
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Originally Posted by RunD1987 View Post
Saw a Lynx on my run once or thought was a Lynx

That was pretty cool
A lynx is more commonly called a Bobcat. They are common in our state. Here is more information from Connecticut DEEP on them. Jay

https://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?q=325974
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Old 12-09-2018, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Northern Fairfield Co.
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Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
A lynx is more commonly called a Bobcat. They are common in our state. Here is more information from Connecticut DEEP on them. Jay

https://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?q=325974
I actually think of a lynx as something a bit different than bobcat. I saw a lynx once in mid-eastern Vermont (a little north of White River Junction in a town called Fairlee — about 5-10 miles west of the New Hampshire border). I think lynx are native to Canada and not to our area . They have quite longer legs than the bobcats that we see in southern New England. Much pointier ears too and more “thick” tufts of hair framing their faces - a lot more “feathering” for lack of better word?
The one I saw in VT had a coat much different than the bobcats that I’ve seen around here also. Much less “tabby striping” if that makes sense? I’ve personally seen bobcat around here on fewer ocassions than I can count on one hand, so i’m no expert - but I did once in Danbury in our friend’s backyard; twice in Sherman (both times on Route 37), and once here in New Fairfield on Warwick Road, next to a swampy area that abutts Route 37 also.
The cat I saw in VT was very much different.

Last edited by Lalalally; 12-09-2018 at 01:56 PM..
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Old 12-09-2018, 04:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lalalally View Post
I actually think of a lynx as something a bit different than bobcat. I saw a lynx once in mid-eastern Vermont (a little north of White River Junction in a town called Fairlee — about 5-10 miles west of the New Hampshire border). I think lynx are native to Canada and not to our area . They have quite longer legs than the bobcats that we see in southern New England. Much pointier ears too and more “thick” tufts of hair framing their faces - a lot more “feathering” for lack of better word?
The one I saw in VT had a coat much different than the bobcats that I’ve seen around here also. Much less “tabby striping” if that makes sense? I’ve personally seen bobcat around here on fewer ocassions than I can count on one hand, so i’m no expert - but I did once in Danbury in our friend’s backyard; twice in Sherman (both times on Route 37), and once here in New Fairfield on Warwick Road, next to a swampy area that abutts Route 37 also.
The cat I saw in VT was very much different.
You are right, they are different. Their ears are different and the lynx has a shorter tail.

I saw a bobcat in Glastonbury this summer, there was no question about it being a mountain lion (and I was driving unlike some of these people who actually take (blurry) video and still insist ML)

https://animals.sandiegozoo.org/animals/lynx-and-bobcat
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Old 12-11-2018, 09:58 PM
 
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Saw a bobcat in the backyard of a friend in Orange.
Never saw one before, but was certain what it was very distinctive look about it. Cant fathom how anyone could confuse it for a mountain lion!
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Old Yesterday, 08:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
A lynx is more commonly called a Bobcat. They are common in our state. Here is more information from Connecticut DEEP on them. Jay

https://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?q=325974
No it's not. A lynx is a lynx and a bobcat is a bobcat. Same genus, different animal.
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