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Old 01-03-2013, 01:12 AM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
12,381 posts, read 22,745,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stylo View Post
We have 120 at the office in lower FFC, and had 1 biker. He lived down the street. He went to another company and now drives to the train so we're at 0 again. We've had a couple people commute by train from NYC, mostly contractors.

I'm all for less cars on the road, but CT is SO car-centric (like most of the country).
You have to make it easier for people to bike or walk to work and then encourage employers and schools to add bike parking and then you will start seeing more and more bike commuters or encourage ppl to bike to the train station. It will take decades but eventually our car centric region will turn into a multi-modal centric region similar to Europe. The Population of this region will be close to 80 million and denser then Europe by 2050 with all Portland-Northern Virgina Highways and the Northeast Corridor overcapacity by 2020. We need to start encouraging more alt modes of Transportation when moving around our towns...like biking or walking neither are that hard to do. Its not like Connecticut or most Northeastern Suburbs are really all that car centric most were designed by the railroad or streetcar or were build dense so changing these suburbs which make up 70% of the suburban population won't be hard.

Trying to make the exurbs livable usually fails , but prevails in the Urbanized suburbs. I'm not saying every street needs bike lanes only the major roads which for the most part are wide enough. Every Street should have a sidewalk at least on one side...and every major road should have them on both sides. Major roads should make it safe for pedestrians to cross at crosswalks and not feel threatened...ie wider 4-6 lane roads should have islands in the center and better viability of the crosswalks....
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Old 01-03-2013, 06:00 AM
 
2,737 posts, read 2,510,240 times
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People who live 10 to 20 miles (or more) from their office are not going to bike to work. Maybe people in the 10 miles or less range may think about it. But the weather here is not friendly to biking for 4 months out of the year nor is much of the terrain (it's pretty hilly in some areas). And most people don't want to show up to work all sweaty.
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Old 01-03-2013, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
14,840 posts, read 18,112,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
You have to make it easier for people to bike or walk to work and then encourage employers and schools to add bike parking and then you will start seeing more and more bike commuters or encourage ppl to bike to the train station. It will take decades but eventually our car centric region will turn into a multi-modal centric region similar to Europe. The Population of this region will be close to 80 million and denser then Europe by 2050 with all Portland-Northern Virgina Highways and the Northeast Corridor overcapacity by 2020. We need to start encouraging more alt modes of Transportation when moving around our towns...like biking or walking neither are that hard to do. Its not like Connecticut or most Northeastern Suburbs are really all that car centric most were designed by the railroad or streetcar or were build dense so changing these suburbs which make up 70% of the suburban population won't be hard.

Trying to make the exurbs livable usually fails , but prevails in the Urbanized suburbs. I'm not saying every street needs bike lanes only the major roads which for the most part are wide enough. Every Street should have a sidewalk at least on one side...and every major road should have them on both sides. Major roads should make it safe for pedestrians to cross at crosswalks and not feel threatened...ie wider 4-6 lane roads should have islands in the center and better viability of the crosswalks....
We are spread out too thin. There isn't enough dense development near public transportation to make biking a viable commute method. Our office is almost 2 miles from the train station will some hills. For me, I live about 20 miles from work, but can take the train. The train for me is almost 2 miles from my house. So I'm looking at biking almost 4 miles each way. I agree that showing up at work a sweaty mess in the summer, or covered in road salt and dirt and a sweaty mess in the winter isn't super appealing.

If our work offered a convenient shuttle from the train station AND I had a parking permit at my local train station (still waiting), then I'd consider using the train. But I can't see biking as viable with the distances and time needed.
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Old 01-03-2013, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Connecticut
24,795 posts, read 40,420,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
Well CT doesn't have the Infrastructure ...but the places that do have the lanes , parking , etc have decent ridership. Norwalk will be the first CT city to have city wide lanes , and pedestrian improvements once those are done later this decade we should see increased usage....Stamford also has plans and New Haven and several smaller towns like Greenwich. Its about making the suburbs livable for people without cars , not everybody wants to live in a city....nor should they be forced to and people shouldn't be forced to drive everywhere given the option of biking , taking transit or walking they seem to drive less....
Uh, New Haven has one of the largest bike to work populations in the country. The city has an extensive network of bike lanes in and around the city and is very actively expanding and improving them. The Route 34/Downtown Crossing project that will start construction in the spring has significant biking elements. Check out the Elm City Cyclists organization which is one of the most active in the country.

I think the reason Fairfield County has less bike to work is the corporate environment of most of the employers (long hours, need to present a well manicured appearance) and the lack of showering and changing facilites. In New Haven though there is a lot of educational and medical employers who are more open and encouraging to using a bike to get to work. Jay
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