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Old 02-13-2013, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,257 posts, read 4,929,454 times
Reputation: 3029

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidyankee764 View Post
The vast majority of people violate the law when it comes to the speed limit. Drive 65 in the middle lane on 91 this evening. Watch how many vehicles pass you, and observe the line of vehicles that will back up behind you.

It's not enforced strictly because even our officers know that the speed limit is unrealistic. As stated earlier in the thread, our highways have been modernized while the speed limits have remained the same.
This is not true. Many of Connecticut's highways have not changed since 1998 when the speed limit was 55 in Connecticut. The speed limit changed in Connecticut on October 1, 1998 from 55 to 65 mph. The National Maximum Speed Law was enacted in 1974. It establishing 55 mph as the national maximum highway speed as part of the Emergency Highway Energy Conservation Act in response to the 1973 oil crisis. This federal law was repealed in 1995.

When the 55 mph speed limit was in place many people traveled at 60 to 65 mph in violation of the law as well. However, some states enforced it more strictly than others.

If you raise the limit to 75 mph not only will more people drive at that speed and waste gas but many more will move their cruising speeds up to 80 to 85.
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Old 02-14-2013, 04:38 AM
 
Location: Live in NY State, work in CT
8,850 posts, read 14,306,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
This is not true. Many of Connecticut's highways have not changed since 1998 when the speed limit was 55 in Connecticut. The speed limit changed in Connecticut on October 1, 1998 from 55 to 65 mph. The National Maximum Speed Law was enacted in 1974. It establishing 55 mph as the national maximum highway speed as part of the Emergency Highway Energy Conservation Act in response to the 1973 oil crisis. This federal law was repealed in 1995.
It's interesting that pre-1974 CT was the ONLY Megalopolis state with a speed limit of 70 or higher, but it was the last state in the nation (other than Hawaii) to raise its limit over 55 when re-allowed.
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Old 02-14-2013, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
15,813 posts, read 22,118,677 times
Reputation: 5299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
This is not true. Many of Connecticut's highways have not changed since 1998 when the speed limit was 55 in Connecticut. The speed limit changed in Connecticut on October 1, 1998 from 55 to 65 mph. The National Maximum Speed Law was enacted in 1974. It establishing 55 mph as the national maximum highway speed as part of the Emergency Highway Energy Conservation Act in response to the 1973 oil crisis. This federal law was repealed in 1995.
Of course they have. I-91 has seen significant improvements in the past decade to on/off ramps and shoulders, as have 84 (Hartford through Waterbury - 4 lanes in some areas). The Merritt Parkway has seen an extension of their on/off ramps, though I don't think the limit should be raised there.
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Old 02-14-2013, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
15,813 posts, read 22,118,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Raise the speed limit to 85 -- and watch virtually nobody drive 95 in response. People have their own personal speed limits, and almost nobody's is faster than 85. Just because they raise the speed limit more than once and people continue to drive 10 over doesn't mean they'll continue to every time it's raised. It just means that the speed limit was set so absurdly low in the first place that it needed to be raised more than twice before virtually everybody drove at or below the limit.
Exactly. This has been studied, but people will believe what they want to believe...
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Old 02-14-2013, 08:40 AM
 
2,893 posts, read 2,982,082 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
This is not true. Many of Connecticut's highways have not changed since 1998 when the speed limit was 55 in Connecticut. The speed limit changed in Connecticut on October 1, 1998 from 55 to 65 mph. The National Maximum Speed Law was enacted in 1974. It establishing 55 mph as the national maximum highway speed as part of the Emergency Highway Energy Conservation Act in response to the 1973 oil crisis. This federal law was repealed in 1995.

When the 55 mph speed limit was in place many people traveled at 60 to 65 mph in violation of the law as well. However, some states enforced it more strictly than others.

If you raise the limit to 75 mph not only will more people drive at that speed and waste gas but many more will move their cruising speeds up to 80 to 85.
Wasting gas is not necessarily a sure thing at higher speeds with transmissions reaching 7 or 8 speeds and more aerodynamic cars. In fact there are many cars that achieve maximum fuel economy above 70 mph. This is no longer a true-ism.
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Old 02-14-2013, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Connecticut
24,774 posts, read 40,387,139 times
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The Federal Highway Administration has studied the effect of raising speed limits on highway and found that it has LITTLE impact on the actual travel speeds on the highways and that lowering speed limits does NOT reduce accidents on highways. The link below will bring you to that study. Jay

Effects Of Raising And Lowering Speed limits
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Old 02-14-2013, 10:46 AM
 
346 posts, read 308,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
The Federal Highway Administration has studied the effect of raising speed limits on highway and found that it has LITTLE impact on the actual travel speeds on the highways and that lowering speed limits does NOT reduce accidents on highways. The link below will bring you to that study. Jay

Effects Of Raising And Lowering Speed limits
Is that a real study? I read it and it was pockmarked with typos. Pretty embarrassing. Plus their disclaimer at the end seemed pretty funny.
Quote:
The entire report is 84 pages long. You can try calling the National Technical Information Service (general info 703-487-4770, sales 703-487-4650) and asking for this report. Even with the report number they won't be able to find it. It's being buried since it says things that certain organizations (both governmental and private) don't want to be made public. However, NMA is selling this report for $15 plus $4 shipping and handaling. They can be contacted at 608/849-6000; nma@motorists.com ; or 6678 Pertzborn Road, Dane, Wisconsin 53529.
This page is part of a larger Reasonable Drivers Unanimous site. Be sure to check the rest of my site out if this is your first time visiting. You won't regret it!
Also, the report is from 1985-1992. When did they increase the federal speed limit to 65mph?

The authors also say
Quote:
...the major emphasis of this research is on streets and highways that were posted between 20 and 55 mi/h (32 and 89 km/h)
It seems a little dubious to compare raising or lowering the speed limits on a 20mph road and doing the same on a 55mph road.
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Live in NY State, work in CT
8,850 posts, read 14,306,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by El Scorcho View Post
Also, the report is from 1985-1992. When did they increase the federal speed limit to 65mph?
1987. Almost every state in the South and west of the Mississippi raised it immediately (worst case within a year). The Upper Midwest and Northeast took their time (with 4 states actually waiting until after speed limit restrictions on states were completely abolished in 1995.....NY and PA "went 65" right after that, CT in 1998 and I'm not sure when Hawaii did (2002 I believe, they only raised it to 60).
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:20 AM
 
346 posts, read 308,274 times
Reputation: 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7 Wishes View Post
1987. Almost every state in the South and west of the Mississippi raised it immediately (worst case within a year). The Upper Midwest and Northeast took their time (with 4 states actually waiting until after speed limit restrictions on states were completely abolished in 1995.....NY and PA "went 65" right after that, CT in 1998 and I'm not sure when Hawaii did (2002 I believe, they only raised it to 60).
Thanks! Any source for that or is that off the top of your head? I tried to give you some green rep points but I need to spread some around first!
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Old 02-14-2013, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
14,832 posts, read 18,093,834 times
Reputation: 3399
Since this thread opened, I've been paying close attention to rush hour speeds on the Merritt from Milford to Westport (without traffic).

The "slow" lane typically stays at 65MPH. People definitely exceed that at 70+ at times, RARELY does anyone go below 60MPH - and when they do, they are passed. That rampant passing can cause disruptions in the flow of traffic, or worse, accidents.

The fast lane tends to travel at 75-80 consistently. Again, if someone enters the fast lane at 65, they get passed on the right. Dangerous.

So how is that 55MPH speed limit helping anyone? No one follows it.
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