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Old 02-21-2013, 03:19 PM
 
8,780 posts, read 16,264,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stylo View Post
Almost identical to Monroe's scores, at least at the high school level.

That said, I wouldn't hesitate to send kids to any of these schools. Well, maybe Stratford is borderline. I guess if commute is less important than schools, Shelton and Milford should be prioritized.
I just wanted to note that while Stratford was below the state average in all of the categories in the thumbnail that you've posted, the percentage of students that scored above proficiency exceeded the state average in all categories. So, what does that mean, exactly? It means that Stratford's worst students disproportionally bring down the average scores for the town. Thanks again, Bridgeport!
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Old 02-21-2013, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
15,744 posts, read 22,025,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stratford, Ct. Resident View Post
I just wanted to note that while Stratford was below the state average in all of the categories in the thumbnail that you've posted, the percentage of students that scored above proficiency exceeded the state average in all categories. So, what does that mean, exactly? It means that Stratford's worst students disproportionally bring down the average scores for the town. Thanks again, Bridgeport!
Yep. That's the problem in many districts and it's proof that education starts at home. When we say "good schools", it really means "students are surrounded by other students from families who value education". It has little to do with what's taught in the classroom.
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Old 02-21-2013, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stratford, Ct. Resident View Post
I just wanted to note that while Stratford was below the state average in all of the categories in the thumbnail that you've posted, the percentage of students that scored above proficiency exceeded the state average in all categories. So, what does that mean, exactly? It means that Stratford's worst students disproportionally bring down the average scores for the town. Thanks again, Bridgeport!
Well, that's actually a good reason to consider Stratford despite the scores.
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Old 02-21-2013, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidyankee764 View Post
Yep. That's the problem in many districts and it's proof that education starts at home. When we say "good schools", it really means "students are surrounded by other students from families who value education". It has little to do with what's taught in the classroom.
Yep. Success starts at home. A lot of these average performing districts can sometimes have better curriculum and opportunities than smaller, more homogenized districts. There's no rule necessarily.
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Old 02-22-2013, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
24,625 posts, read 40,208,466 times
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Sorry I was not able to post sooner on this one. I would recommend Fairfield. There are a lot of modest homes on the east side of town in the OP's price range. They may be modest and need some work but they certainly are liveable and with the new Fairfield Metro Center train station, they are more convenient to Manhattan than Stratford or Shelton. The schools in Fairfield are excellent and there is a lot to do. The town has nice parks and beaches and a lot of family activities. There is a nice downtown area with great shops and restaurants. I think the OP should defintiely check into it as well. Jay
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Old 02-22-2013, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
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The more economically diverse the population, the lower the average test scores. There are a few exceptions.

IMHO, NCLB (now Race To The Top) and the publishing of test scores, has done more damage to the diversity of many communities than any other factor. It is a self-fulfilling prophesy and often works against the goals and desires of closing the gap and urban redevelopment. Many people use these scores as a key deciding factor in selecting a community. This results in driving up home prices and essentially keeping out a large portion of the population who cannot afford to live there.

There is a lot more to learning than what is measured on a state test. Districts with high test scores do not necessarily provide better or richer learning experiences and often fail to meet the needs of many of its students. It's important to take a closer look beyond the scores and ask specific questions regarding what types of learning experiences truly take place. As Stylo said, in many cases those districts scoring around the average have a lot more to offer.
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Old 02-23-2013, 08:25 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,687,871 times
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The problem with suggesting homes that are within their price range, but need work, is that - the work involved might put them out of their price range. I mean, a new light socket, nailing a couple of loose floor planks, patching and painting the walls, and installation of cable wire is one thing. Renovating a bathroom and re-roofing the house is quite another.

For that reason I would be careful recommending Fairfield. There -are- less expensive homes as JayCT points out, but as he also points out, they tend to need work. The lower the price, the more work it's likely to need, in that area.
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Old 02-23-2013, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
The problem with suggesting homes that are within their price range, but need work, is that - the work involved might put them out of their price range. I mean, a new light socket, nailing a couple of loose floor planks, patching and painting the walls, and installation of cable wire is one thing. Renovating a bathroom and re-roofing the house is quite another.

For that reason I would be careful recommending Fairfield. There -are- less expensive homes as JayCT points out, but as he also points out, they tend to need work. The lower the price, the more work it's likely to need, in that area.
Come on now. These homes don't need massive work. They may not have the most modern or stylish kitchens and baths but that does not mean they are not liveable or are going to be moneypits. In their price range there are many homes in good shape that the OP could buy and live in for years without major remodeling costs. Then they can upgrade like most people do with sweat equity and pay-as-you go projects. Nothing wrong with that. Remember you can change just about anything in a house but its location. Jay
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Old 02-26-2013, 02:17 PM
 
Location: New York
7 posts, read 29,671 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidyankee764 View Post
Yep. That's the problem in many districts and it's proof that education starts at home. When we say "good schools", it really means "students are surrounded by other students from families who value education". It has little to do with what's taught in the classroom.


Completlyb agree with you!
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Old 03-25-2013, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
2,527 posts, read 2,149,080 times
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Sweetcee...I have found a couple of sites very helpful when looking at the school systems around the area:

NeighborhoodScout and GreatSchools. You can kind of dig into the test scores, parent reviews (on Greatschools) and student/teacher ratios. I take the GreatSchools rankings with a grain of salt though. NeighborhoodScout gives you a breakdown of median home prices, demographics, etc. on areas you are looking at as well although no "resident reviews".
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