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Old 02-22-2013, 10:30 AM
 
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SAT scores:

SAT Scores: How Does Your School Compare To Others In Connecticut - Courant.com

See attached image for Milford vs. State Averages:

In Connecticut, the average 2012 reading score fell three points, from 509 to 506. The average math score was 512, a point lower than the 513 average score in 2011. Writing scores dipped three points, from 513 to 510.

SAT scores slipping - Connecticut Post

Home Values: SFH $278,000

See image (Zillow, Raveis both confirm the $250m overall and $278m single family- based on sales not values)

Manufacturing Jobs: State average is 7.9% vs. 14% in Milford. See image.
Attached Thumbnails
Best Blue Collar CT Town-sat-scores.jpg   Best Blue Collar CT Town-home-prices.jpg   Best Blue Collar CT Town-manufacturing.jpg  
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Old 02-22-2013, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
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Thanks for the sources.

Zillow says CT average is $224,000, so it's still above average.

The SAT scores do need to come up more in line with CAPT scores, but that doesn't mean it's a blue collar town.

I realize it's a largely subjective call, but I think most would disagree with it.

Branford is statistically very similar to Milford in many ways, would you call it blue collar too?
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Old 02-22-2013, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stylo View Post
Thanks for the sources.

Zillow says CT average is $224,000, so it's still above average.

The SAT scores do need to come up more in line with CAPT scores, but that doesn't mean it's a blue collar town.

I realize it's a largely subjective call, but I think most would disagree with it.

Branford is statistically very similar to Milford in many ways, would you call it blue collar too?
The Short Beach section of Branford is pretty blue collar, but the rest of the town is middle/upper middle class, with a few very wealthy neighborhoods.
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Old 02-22-2013, 10:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidyankee764 View Post
Absolutely. I lived there, too, and the fact that it's arguably the wealthiest area in the country definitely skews one's perception of reality.

That said, I would never consider Milford a blue collar community.
It's true that perception is reality. The act of defining a town based on societal status (blue collar vs. white collar) is very subjective in of itself. That said, I don't think there is a right label or a wrong label for any town.

In my opinion, I, too, do not see Milford as a blue collar community. Out of the folks I personally know who live in Milford (or are from Milford and still live there), most are white-collar professionals. Even those who work in an Industrial setting do more white-collar type of work (e.g. design engineer who works with AutoCAD, R&D engineer but often travels to see clients, etc.). They don't fit the traditional perceived-definition of "blue-collar."

In lower Connecticut, my vote for best perceived "blue-collar" town is Seymour. They seem to have a good blend of affordable property, solid schooling, low crime, etc. and the perception is that many Seymour residents work in industrial manufacturing simply because they are surrounded by it.

When driving along Route 8, through the Valley towns, and based on general knowledge, there seems to be a decent amount of industrial manufacturing jobs in nearby Naugatuk, Waterbury, especially in Torrington and even in Bridgeport.

I don't know much about the schooling or income levels of these towns, but my gut feeling is that in Northern Connecticut, the Greater Manchester (e.g. South Windsor) area is not too bad for "blue collar" living. There seems to be a ton of industrial manucturing in that end of the state.
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Old 02-22-2013, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Wallingford, CT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike 75 View Post
I think Wallingford is like Milford, perhaps it was blue collar 30 years ago but it's gotten a bit more upscale so now it's more mixed economically.
The center is certainly not and I wasn't alive 30 years ago.

Milford and Wallingford do seem similar to me though. Pretty hit or miss depending on which part of town you're in, pretty equidistant to New Haven, really dense commercial areas.
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Old 02-22-2013, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
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Originally Posted by Comp625 View Post
Even those who work in an Industrial setting do more white-collar type of work (e.g. design engineer who works with AutoCAD, R&D engineer but often travels to see clients, etc.). They don't fit the traditional perceived-definition of "blue-collar."
I'm sure a decent chunk of those manufacturing jobs in Milford were Sikorsky or Hubbell.
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Old 02-22-2013, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
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Originally Posted by Csiko View Post
Milford and Wallingford do seem similar to me though. Pretty hit or miss depending on which part of town you're in, pretty equidistant to New Haven, really dense commercial areas.
Wallingford is missing the extensive waterfront (the most in CT) which makes up for a lot of $1MM+ homes, and also the commutability to FFC. There are some similarities though, especially given both have a middle class core, a large commercial strip, in addition to a significant traditional town center.
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Old 02-22-2013, 12:27 PM
 
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After I re-read my post, a question crossed my mind. How are people specifically defining "blue-collar"?

I don't think wealth is a good point of comparison. There are many industrial/manufacturing folks that I know who make really good money vs. other white-collar folks I know. The "class" of job is also a variable (e.g. like I mentioned before, I have friends who do high-end R&D, but a portion of their job involves being in a suit & tie to sell to clientele -- more white-collar).

Also, I think it is necessary to adjust the definition so that it better reflects a modern era of industrial-technological advancements. For example, should we classify drug manufacturers (e.g. Alexion in New Haven) as industrial? Or is the definition more traditional and solely reflect energy and manufacturing companies (e.g. Southern Connecticut Gas Company, Sikorsky or Sargent in New Haven)?
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Old 02-22-2013, 12:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stylo View Post
Wallingford is missing the extensive waterfront (the most in CT) which makes up for a lot of $1MM+ homes, and also the commutability to FFC. There are some similarities though, especially given both have a middle class core, a large commercial strip, in addition to a significant traditional town center.
I've heard that Milford has the largest waterfront in CT, but if you jump on Google Maps (or other tools), Greenwich has a much larger waterfront. 13.5 miles vs. ~10. I can copy and paste my work if you'd like, and I was more than generous on my "lines" in favor of Milford. Branford also has more extensive waterfront.
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Old 02-22-2013, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilton2ParkAve View Post
I've heard that Milford has the largest waterfront in CT, but if you jump on Google Maps (or other tools), Greenwich has a much larger waterfront. 13.5 miles vs. ~10. I can copy and paste my work if you'd like, and I was more than generous on my "lines" in favor of Milford. Branford also has more extensive waterfront.
I've seen it cited in several places. Couple examples (although note both are different):

Destination: Milford, Connecticut
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milford...nd_environment
If You're Thinking of Living In/Milford, Conn. - Long Shoreline and a Wealth of Activities - NYTimes.com

I could see Branford being close, but not Greenwich. It does have a ton of jutting islands and inlets, but so does most of the coast. Estimates for Milford probably include the harbor and Gulf Pond, as they are salt water. And maybe the lower mouth of the Housatonic?

Any cartographers here? :P
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