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Old 12-04-2013, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Northeast states
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What your thought on this with Connncicut high cost of lviing too.




Milk Prices Could Soar to $8 a Gallon as U.S. Nears "Dairy Cliff" | NBC Connecticut
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Old 12-04-2013, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
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The dairy business is pretty sick. The conditions that the animals reside in are often deplorable. That and it's not particularly healthy to drink tons of pasteurized dairy. The nation consumes too much of it. In moderation it can be OK, but it can cause allergy problems in children.

Personally, I happily spend that much or more on local raw dairy from farms.
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Old 12-05-2013, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Connecticut
24,576 posts, read 40,130,038 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stylo View Post
The dairy business is pretty sick. The conditions that the animals reside in are often deplorable. That and it's not particularly healthy to drink tons of pasteurized dairy. The nation consumes too much of it. In moderation it can be OK, but it can cause allergy problems in children.

Personally, I happily spend that much or more on local raw dairy from farms.
I laugh when I hear comments like this. You can tell you do not have children. It was not that long ago that the average child had a calcium and Vitiman D deficiency. Drinking milk was promoted as a good way to get that calcium and Vitiman D. It still is. Sorry but the medical industry spends too much time arguing and flip-flopping on what is healthiest for people. Any food in moderation is fine. Milk is a good source of both and most children are willing to drink it regularly. If you listen to everything the medical industry says about food, you will drive yourself crazy. Jay
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Old 12-05-2013, 07:53 AM
 
2,601 posts, read 2,641,514 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
I laugh when I hear comments like this. You can tell you do not have children. It was not that long ago that the average child had a calcium and Vitiman D deficiency. Drinking milk was promoted as a good way to get that calcium and Vitiman D. It still is. Sorry but the medical industry spends too much time arguing and flip-flopping on what is healthiest for people. Any food in moderation is fine. Milk is a good source of both and most children are willing to drink it regularly. If you listen to everything the medical industry says about food, you will drive yourself crazy. Jay
Agreed. Every week something new causes cancer or some other b.s. The problem is that these studies that the media are irresponsibly reporting are totally inconclusive/unproven and many times flip flop. You could find some b.s. flawed paper on about anything. Sometimes somebody just wants funding for further research. Milk is healthy and nutritious.
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Old 12-05-2013, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
14,715 posts, read 17,938,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
I laugh when I hear comments like this. You can tell you do not have children. It was not that long ago that the average child had a calcium and Vitiman D deficiency. Drinking milk was promoted as a good way to get that calcium and Vitiman D. It still is. Sorry but the medical industry spends too much time arguing and flip-flopping on what is healthiest for people. Any food in moderation is fine. Milk is a good source of both and most children are willing to drink it regularly. If you listen to everything the medical industry says about food, you will drive yourself crazy. Jay
Nothing wrong with calcium and vitamin D. In the case of vitamin D, it's not naturally in milk. It was added for that deficiency (people spending too much time indoors), just like iodine was added to salt because it's lacking in modern agricultural soil. You can get enough vitamin D by being outside regularly, or by taking supplements (vitamin D, fish oil tablets, etc). As far as calcium, some milk is a fine source, so's yogurt products - which are easier to digest.

I've had the same stance on milk for over 10 years and have done a lot of research on the subject. I tend to be pretty pragmatic about the whole organic vs. conventional debate and whatnot, but I do think excessive milk consumption is an issue in our country. Not because of the milk itself, but because of how it's produced and processed. When I have children, they will either have raw milk or I will make sure that they are drinking store bought milk that wasn't produced with hormones or antibiotics, and in moderation.

This is definitely not a subject I've flip-flopped on.
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Old 12-05-2013, 03:07 PM
 
109 posts, read 83,646 times
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Tasting raw milk was eye opening to see how milk should really taste. Wow!

Forks Over Knives is a good documentary that talks about the dairy industry and their health claims. The documentary showed the correlation between the countries with the highest dairy consumption also having the highest numbers of osteoperosis. Their explanation was that dairy is very acidic and to balance PH your body will pull calcium from your bones.
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Old 12-05-2013, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
14,715 posts, read 17,938,672 times
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Originally Posted by Goose-boy View Post
Tasting raw milk was eye opening to see how milk should really taste. Wow!
You're right, most store milk tastes odd to me now. I'll put it in my coffee though.
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Old 12-05-2013, 05:27 PM
 
1,704 posts, read 1,521,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stylo View Post
The dairy business is pretty sick. The conditions that the animals reside in are often deplorable. That and it's not particularly healthy to drink tons of pasteurized dairy. The nation consumes too much of it. In moderation it can be OK, but it can cause allergy problems in children.

Personally, I happily spend that much or more on local raw dairy from farms.
In India, milk is a staple food product. I never heard of anyone with milk allergies there.
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Old 12-05-2013, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Ubique
4,052 posts, read 2,930,089 times
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Originally Posted by Yuptag View Post
In India, milk is a staple food product. I never heard of anyone with milk allergies there.
Of course there are milk allergies. Just because you never heard them in India, does not mean they don't exist in America. I am sure they also exist in India.
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Old 12-05-2013, 06:17 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,613,675 times
Reputation: 20198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stylo View Post
Nothing wrong with calcium and vitamin D. In the case of vitamin D, it's not naturally in milk. It was added for that deficiency (people spending too much time indoors), just like iodine was added to salt because it's lacking in modern agricultural soil. You can get enough vitamin D by being outside regularly, or by taking supplements (vitamin D, fish oil tablets, etc). As far as calcium, some milk is a fine source, so's yogurt products - which are easier to digest.

I've had the same stance on milk for over 10 years and have done a lot of research on the subject. I tend to be pretty pragmatic about the whole organic vs. conventional debate and whatnot, but I do think excessive milk consumption is an issue in our country. Not because of the milk itself, but because of how it's produced and processed. When I have children, they will either have raw milk or I will make sure that they are drinking store bought milk that wasn't produced with hormones or antibiotics, and in moderation.

This is definitely not a subject I've flip-flopped on.
If you really did *research* (as opposed to just surfing the web for op-ed pieces) on dairy, you'd know that milk in the USA is not sold legally with any antibiotics at all. In fact, if a cow has an infection, she is pulled off the milking line, given antibiotics, and not allowed back onto the line until a veterinarian has given her a clean bill of health, and shows no traces of antibiotics.

If you really did *research* you'd know that there exists no way to tell if the hormone in the milk is the hormone that comes with the cow, or the hormone that was injected into the cow. The hormone is, chemically, identical. And cows produce GBH naturally, it is always present in their milk. There is no way to get it out of the milk and again - there exists no way to tell if the GBH is the natural GBH, or if it's the recombinant injected GBH.

So either you really didn't do any research, or your research is flawed.

As for the topic itself, I'm not too worried. They said the prices would soar a few years ago too. I think butterfat went up around 38 cents/pound, that month. That meant something like 7 cents per gallon of milk, wholesale, and 11 or 12 cents retail.

If it does go up, it won't just be milk that's impacted. It'll be cheese, and fast food prices, and frozen pizza, and frozen any other foods that have cheese in them or are dairy-based. But I don't think the market will bear that kind of increase, and so I'm not worried about it at all.
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