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Old 04-19-2014, 10:55 PM
 
Location: CT, New England
678 posts, read 548,065 times
Reputation: 248

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Totally agree with you, Nep. Most of the new construction around Connecticut runs costlier. They're more designed for family. I've read your situation around here and an exodus coming from you is expected. In your current status, Connecticut is not in your best interest. If you had a family, however, a bit more settled in life, etc, you can definitely afford a newly built home somewhere bustling in CT for $400k, I'm sure.

I like Charlotte, myself. Charlotte has a plethora of problems, too, my complaints with Charlotte is:

- Weather. The humidity sucks, and in some Summer days, forget doing anything outside. It's just waaaaay too hot and humid. I have to be stuck in AC all day. I don't think it's possible or humane to live in CLT without an AC. I still think Spring weather of New England is the best in the country. Even though it's there for like, 2 and a half months.

- Transportation Infrastructure. Yes, Charlotte has newer buildings and roads, but considering its population growth, they did NOT plan the city well for the amount of traffic it'll be getting. I've already heard it's pretty bad around downtown (they call it uptown, silly Southerners, lol!), and while they are trying to complete projects, I just don't think it can keep up with the growth. I don't blame them, though. No one saw Charlotte becoming what it is now. It really peaked these past decades.

- Intolerance. Some parts are really nice, open minded what not. South Charlotte is pretty affluent and has wonderful schools, but I can't say the same for rest of CLT. It exists and my family down there have been subject to it plenty of times than I have in CT...ever. It's sad

- Plus, it's the South. It's not the REAL United States of America like how New England is. Don't forget, they fought against us in the Civil War. These people supported inequality all the way till the 1960s, lol! Kidding, kidding...kinda.

I guess my points can be applied to other Southern cities with huge growth like the ones in Florida.
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Old 04-19-2014, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Hartford, CT
10,834 posts, read 12,019,867 times
Reputation: 6378
Quote:
Originally Posted by FutureTown View Post
Totally agree with you, Nep. Most of the new construction around Connecticut runs costlier. They're more designed for family. I've read your situation around here and an exodus coming from you is expected. In your current status, Connecticut is not in your best interest. If you had a family, however, a bit more settled in life, etc, you can definitely afford a newly built home somewhere bustling in CT for $400k, I'm sure.

I like Charlotte, myself. Charlotte has a plethora of problems, too, my complaints with Charlotte is:

- Weather. The humidity sucks, and in some Summer days, forget doing anything outside. It's just waaaaay too hot and humid. I have to be stuck in AC all day. I don't think it's possible or humane to live in CLT without an AC. I still think Spring weather of New England is the best in the country. Even though it's there for like, 2 and a half months.

- Transportation Infrastructure. Yes, Charlotte has newer buildings and roads, but considering its population growth, they did NOT plan the city well for the amount of traffic it'll be getting. I've already heard it's pretty bad around downtown (they call it uptown, silly Southerners, lol!), and while they are trying to complete projects, I just don't think it can keep up with the growth. I don't blame them, though. No one saw Charlotte becoming what it is now. It really peaked these past decades.

- Intolerance. Some parts are really nice, open minded what not. South Charlotte is pretty affluent and has wonderful schools, but I can't say the same for rest of CLT. It exists and my family down there have been subject to it plenty of times than I have in CT...ever. It's sad

- Plus, it's the South. It's not the REAL United States of America like how New England is. Don't forget, they fought against us in the Civil War. These people supported inequality all the way till the 1960s, lol! Kidding, kidding...kinda.

I guess my points can be applied to other Southern cities with huge growth like the ones in Florida.
Yeah I tried living in Charlotte for a month, last year. In hindsight, it was a pleasant place to live. (I lived just over the border in SC, actually). But, after awhile, I think the isolation and southern accents really got to me, lol. But I gotta admit, I liked the abundance of new construction everywhere. It's 2014 for crying out loud. CT just feels so stuck in the past compared to the rest of the nation. With everything from infrastructure to housing.

The only seasons I like in CT are summer and winter. I hate fall the most because it's depressing/decline and I'd rather see lush greenery than brown, yellow and orange decaying looking leaves.
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Old 04-20-2014, 05:01 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,155 posts, read 4,566,693 times
Reputation: 2814
New construction is only new when it is new. 10 years down the road it is no longer new construction. There are a ton of cheaply-built new construction homes. Just because it is new construction does not mean it is quality construction. In fact, many older buildings were built with materials that are no longer available due to cost or scarcity. These older buildings often have superior architectural elements and are more unique in character than most of the cookie cutter new construction developments. A quality-built new construction home is most likely a custom home which is going to cost more than comparable existing homes in the area.

Many people are lured down south to the cheaper "new homes" they see when visiting. Those homes are not the same as homes in the northeast. Homes in the northeast have to be built to withstand more extreme weather conditions and cost more to build.
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Old 04-20-2014, 05:43 AM
 
2,440 posts, read 2,078,870 times
Reputation: 1334
I am not a fan of new construction. Unless built by a custom homes builder I find most large home builders work to be cheap, use inferior products and not that high of quality. I live in a house that was built in the 1840's and it is built with better craftsmanship than some new homes. New does not always mean better. It's new...until it's not.
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Old 04-20-2014, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,155 posts, read 4,566,693 times
Reputation: 2814
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_250 View Post
I am not a fan of new construction. Unless built by a custom homes builder I find most large home builders work to be cheap, use inferior products and not that high of quality. I live in a house that was built in the 1840's and it is built with better craftsmanship than some new homes. New does not always mean better. It's new...until it's not.
I have built 3 homes. In each home I have incorporated quality components and available energy-efficiency components. It added about 10% to the build cost over comparable homes in the area. Many of these added costs have been fully recovered in in the first 3 years such as insulation and heating systems. The quality windows I used will take longer to recover but will undoubtably last longer than cheaper ones that many builders use. Many of the builder windows will lose their seals and significantly deteriorate in 10 to 15 years.

However, it has been my experience that most buyers of new construction (or existing) do not place a high premium for what is behind the walls or nonsexy things like superior heating and cooling systems, insulation, and windows. They only care about what they can see such as granite, stainless steel appliances, and nice flooring. That is the reason that most builders do not spend their money on mechanicals, insulation, and other less noticed items. If new homes were built to a higher standard with more emphasis placed on energy efficiency, proper site facing, and durability it would significantly reduce our energy and resource consumption.
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Old 04-20-2014, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Texas
2,394 posts, read 3,118,937 times
Reputation: 1381
Quote:
Originally Posted by FutureTown View Post
Charlotte has a plethora of problems, too, my complaints with Charlotte is:

...

- Transportation Infrastructure.
Ironic, coming from the state with approximately the least interest in improving transportation infrastructure of any state I've ever been in.
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Old 04-20-2014, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Northern Fairfield Co.
2,420 posts, read 1,846,710 times
Reputation: 1010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post

However, it has been my experience that most buyers of new construction (or existing) do not place a high premium for what is behind the walls or nonsexy things like superior heating and cooling systems, insulation, and windows. They only care about what they can see such as granite, stainless steel appliances, and nice flooring. That is the reason that most builders do not spend their money on mechanicals, insulation, and other less noticed items. If new homes were built to a higher standard with more emphasis placed on energy efficiency, proper site facing, and durability it would significantly reduce our energy and resource consumption.
Kind of in the same vein, but a little off topic: a number of years ago when friends of ours moved to a then new development in Southbury, I was kind of blown away by how quickly each of the homes went up, and it was on a strict timetable of 1 week intervals: I.e. your house done week one, your next door neighbor's was completed 1 week later, two doors down, 2 weeks later, etc. I remember visiting the site with them on Mother's Day, so say it was about the 2nd week of May. The foundation had just been dug and we were basically just looking at just a hole in the ground. They closed and moved into their new home the first week of August. Ten weeks start to finish. I guess I always thought it took a heck of a lot longer to build, but apparently I was wrong. Still thinking about it now amazes me, especially since we're going to be redoing our kitchen, and I was told to expect about half that time and that's just for a kitchen
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Old 04-20-2014, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Hartford, CT
10,834 posts, read 12,019,867 times
Reputation: 6378
Yeah but I just hate the appearance and weathered look of older homes. Too many ugly raised ranches in CT. It's a major turn off to people who are from southern states, based on what I hear from friends in FL and NC. After traveling the country, it's a turn off to me too. As soon as I re entered the northeast, I felt like I went back in time BIG time because of all the old ugly construction. I don't find anything appealing about 60s and 70s era raised ranches.
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Old 04-22-2014, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Selden New York
1,105 posts, read 1,516,097 times
Reputation: 502
i Want to move to CT im so sick of Long island.
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Old 04-22-2014, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Fairfield County, CT
14,491 posts, read 20,127,496 times
Reputation: 4617
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Yeah but I just hate the appearance and weathered look of older homes. Too many ugly raised ranches in CT. It's a major turn off to people who are from southern states, based on what I hear from friends in FL and NC. After traveling the country, it's a turn off to me too. As soon as I re entered the northeast, I felt like I went back in time BIG time because of all the old ugly construction. I don't find anything appealing about 60s and 70s era raised ranches.
Better than the trailer parks that are common in those states.
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