U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Connecticut
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-25-2014, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Hartford, CT
10,834 posts, read 11,967,309 times
Reputation: 6377

Advertisements

I mean, the state is barely growing in population or economy wise. It's only growing at a rate of 2-3% compared with the national average of like 9%. If this keeps up, the entire population of CT will become smaller and smaller as a percentage of the nations population. Also, CT GDP will become smaller and smaller as a percentage of the nation's population. And finally, because of all this, I can see CT becoming less of an impact on national elections, with its electoral votes being reduced from 7 to 6 or even 5, in the far future.

If trends continue, this state will become even less and less nationally significant.

What do you think?

Last edited by nep321; 04-25-2014 at 07:40 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-25-2014, 06:20 PM
 
1,692 posts, read 1,414,277 times
Reputation: 975
I think the state will continue to fluctuate in population upwards and downwards as it has throughout its entire history

The state already did go through declining population and then new growth. It was an agricultural state then it became a shrinking state and then it went back to a crowded industrial state,

Then it became the service sector state it is now ...and if it declines again ....well it will become a future shelter from the American west once global temperature rise causes droughts and hurricanes to the south

If population does shrink, then the natural habitats and reforestation along magnificent coastal waters and mountains will become a new lost land in a later time in the future.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2014, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Wallingford, CT
1,061 posts, read 943,757 times
Reputation: 1217
It would be really interesting to me if we still have states in the same capacity as now in 20-30 years, so it doesn't matter to me too much if CT grows a little more slowly than its neighbors.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2014, 06:59 PM
 
Location: CT
2,127 posts, read 1,530,256 times
Reputation: 1642
CT isn't exactly a "major player". Stupid enough people in this country don't even know it's a state. Educated people from other countries have no idea it's a state. Nothing kills a conversation quicker than talking to a foreigner and saying "i'm from CT".

7 is also not a lot of electoral votes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2014, 06:59 PM
 
Location: New London County, CT
8,956 posts, read 9,038,284 times
Reputation: 5073
Is it nationally significant now? I'm not sure what this means, so the question is hard to answer.

The shifts that need to be made in the economy are national, for the most part. Connecticut has an opportunity to lead the way, however, I think in my lifetime, the national trends will continue and Connecticut will continue to reflect what's giong on nationally.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2014, 07:03 PM
 
4,445 posts, read 3,605,055 times
Reputation: 1929
It's not really nationally significant now, is it?

Is Connecticut a major stop on presidential campaign tours? No. Hasn't been for a while, though.

The only time national politicians of either party stop in the state is for a quiet fundraiser down around Greenwich. That's really where CT is nationally significant - fundraising money for politicians.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2014, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
13,781 posts, read 15,141,026 times
Reputation: 30896
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlassoff View Post
Is it nationally significant now? I'm not sure what this means, so the question is hard to answer.
What I was thinking. I cannot imagine CT being less significant than it already is. The whole discussion is a non sequitur.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2014, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Fairfield, CT
5,082 posts, read 7,423,708 times
Reputation: 4903
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I mean, the state is barely growing in population or economy wise. It's only growing at a rate of 2-3% compared with the national average of like 9%. If this keeps up, the entire population of CT will become smaller and smaller as a percentage of the nations population. Also, CT GDP will become smaller and smaller as a percentage of the nation's population. And finally, because of all this, I can see CT becoming less of an impact on national elections, with its electoral votes being reduced from 7 to 6 or even 5, in the far future.

If trends continue, this state will become less and less nationally significant.

What do you think?
It's not nationally significant now. And it will become less so for the foreseeable future. It doesn't really matter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2014, 07:09 PM
 
2,440 posts, read 2,065,057 times
Reputation: 1333
I wish CT could get back to the time where it was the manufacturing capital of the world. If you owned a gun it came from Hartford. We had inventors, factories and all around meant something to the United States. We made hats to nuts and bolts to some if the world famous factories. We had a hand in anything people owned. Now when you say CT people assume you are rich, which I could say for 90% of the people is not the case.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2014, 07:10 PM
 
Location: classified
1,681 posts, read 2,835,205 times
Reputation: 1491
As an outsider who does not live in Connecticut I still think Connecticut will still be significant on a national stage simply because of it's existing connections to New York City not to mention institutions such as Yale University being based in the state. Also the state is still one of the wealthiest in the US with a very huge concentration of wealthy powerbrokers in places such as New Canaan, which is also where a lot of hedge funds are based so I think the state would still be influential on a national scale even if there is no increase in the overall population.

You should also note that the vast majority of population and job growth in places like Arizona, Florida, and Texas tend to be minimum wage jobs employed by unskilled immigrants making barely above or/at minimum wage so it's not like having stagnant population growth is a bad thing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2013 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Connecticut

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top