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Old 06-12-2014, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,111,324 times
Reputation: 7075

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http://blog.ctnews.com/financialmine...ing-residents/

http://www.yourpublicmedia.org/conte...eople-don-t-go

I seriously can't believe how many people that I went to high school or college with, or just was plain friend with here in CT have left the state within the past several years. It seems like the past 12 months has been very rapid out-migration as well, for people aged 25-35.

I read somewhere that 53% of high school graduates in CT end up moving out of the state permanently. And most of the guys that I know that left CT are happy with their move and don't miss the state at all, other than some family and friends.

It seems lately like TEXAS is the major beneficiary of CT outmigration of young people. Literally FOUR guys I know around my age have moved to Texas within the past year. And a FIFTH friend of mine is moving there this summer. They have mostly been going to Houston, and one is going to Austin.

I am seriously beginning to think that the reason I have been so lucky with finding employment in CT is nothing more than because of the lack of competition from other people of similar age/skill level.

It's a really depressing matter and it's a BIG concern for the future of the state. In fact, I think it's the #1 political issue that the state needs to deal with. Retention of young people.

Furthermore, virtually everyone I know that's single, aged 25-35 and currently living in CT in general, does not like living here and would move out if they could. We all saw those recent statistics about how 49% of CT residents want to move out. Well, if you look at that data for people aged 25-35, I bet you that figure is more like 70%. And you know, I even have a couple of friends who are straight, married and have children that are eager to move out.

Sigh...right now I'm renting month-to-month, am 30 years old, single and I don't know if I'm going to stay here either, let alone relocating back to near Hartford.

Last edited by nep321; 06-12-2014 at 05:18 PM..

 
Old 06-12-2014, 05:18 PM
 
Location: CT
2,122 posts, read 1,844,906 times
Reputation: 1653
Well the Texas economy is doing very well. Houston and Austin in particular are very "hip" cities with a lot going on. The COL is lower, there is no income tax, plenty of universities, good schools in the suburbs, reasonable home prices and plenty of jobs. If you don't mind not having 4 seasons and your industry exists there, why wouldn't you move? Especially at the specified age group.

My wife and I are mid 20s and getting the hell out of dodge. We will slowly be getting the house ready to go up for sale by next spring (march/april 2015) and heading south to a state that is not contracting and has its finances in order.

The same thing is going on with all my friend I grew up with in NY.
 
Old 06-12-2014, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Rochester, NY
1,129 posts, read 1,073,610 times
Reputation: 371
I'm 23 and want to be out of this state by Winter 2014/early 2015.
 
Old 06-12-2014, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Tolland, Connecticut
691 posts, read 946,765 times
Reputation: 487
Texas does have it's appeal:

-no state income tax
-a plethora of new construction homes with all the modern amenities one can ask for, at a reasonable price (the fact that people pay upwards of half a million dollars here on some 'charming' 1950's 1,000 sq. ft cape in west hartford that lacks any remotely modern amenities whatsoever because of it's 'charm' makes me want to puke)
-a modern infrastructure, backed by a government that actually TRIES to do something about improving its transportation issues

I happen to like 'sprawl' and all that comes with subdivisions, gated communities, and 'Mcmansions'.

I'd also consider the Las Vegas and Salt Lake City areas in the future, as well.



Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Report: Connecticut tops nation in losing residents - Financial Mines

Young People, Don't Go! | yourpublicmedia.org

I seriously can't believe how many people that I went to high school or college with, or just was plain friend with here in CT have left the state within the past several years. It seems like the past 12 months has been very rapid out-migration as well, for people aged 25-35.

I read somewhere that 53% of high school graduates in CT end up moving out of the state permanently. And most of the guys that I know that left CT are happy with their move and don't miss the state at all, other than some family and friends.

It seems lately like TEXAS is the major beneficiary of CT outmigration of young people. Literally FOUR guys I know around my age have moved to Texas within the past year. And a FIFTH friend of mine is moving there this summer. They have mostly been going to Houston, and one is going to Austin.

I am seriously beginning to think that the reason I have been so lucky with finding employment in CT is nothing more than because of the lack of competition from other people of similar age/skill level.

It's a really depressing matter and it's a BIG concern for the future of the state. In fact, I think it's the #1 political issue that the state needs to deal with. Retention of young people.

Furthermore, virtually everyone I know that's single, aged 25-35 and currently living in CT in general, does not like living here and would move out if they could. We all saw those recent statistics about how 49% of CT residents want to move out. Well, if you look at that data for people aged 25-35, I bet you that figure is more like 70%. And you know, I even have a couple of friends who are straight, married and have children that are eager to move out.

Sigh...right now I'm renting month-to-month, am 30 years old, single and I don't know if I'm going to stay here either, let alone relocating back to near Hartford.
 
Old 06-12-2014, 05:51 PM
 
Location: CT
2,122 posts, read 1,844,906 times
Reputation: 1653
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulpfiction View Post
Texas does have it's appeal:

-no state income tax
-a plethora of new construction homes with all the modern amenities one can ask for, at a reasonable price (the fact that people pay upwards of half a million dollars here on some 'charming' 1950's 1,000 sq. ft cape in west hartford that lacks any remotely modern amenities whatsoever because of it's 'charm' makes me want to puke)
-a modern infrastructure, backed by a government that actually TRIES to do something about improving its transportation issues

I happen to like 'sprawl' and all that comes with subdivisions, gated communities, and 'Mcmansions'.

I'd also consider the Las Vegas and Salt Lake City areas in the future, as well.
Agree 100%. Cannot wrap my head around the 60-100 year old houses going for over 400k with annual taxes in the 7k range. Not my thing.

I too like "sprawl" with clean, manicured and modern look. We will be moving to the greater Nashville area. The houses are about 100k less (in the wealthiest county in the state) than even modest CT towns. Spending the same exact amount of money I will get a larger house with an extra bedroom and a bonus room that was built in the 21st century in a subdivision with a community pool, dog park, playground etc (again all in the SUBDIVISION, not just the town), with property taxes that are a third of what we pay now. Not to mention the area is growing like crazy with business booming.
 
Old 06-12-2014, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
15,371 posts, read 19,126,095 times
Reputation: 3594
The biggest thing the state needs to do in order to retain more young people is to better support the growth of its cities. Young people don't want to live in suburbs. They want vibrant walkable cities. Stamford is doing well and New Haven is starting to show promise but the state could still do much more. Austin has had so much support for its growth, both grassroots and from leadership.

The state makes a big mistake when they offer benefits to companies that move into the suburbs. If they're going to be doling out tax benefits and grants to corporations, they should encourage them to open up shop in our cities. Attracting young talent to these companies is also reliant on having a vibrant urban environment. You also see the dated and dismal campaigns and work done for CT Tourism, which is partially tasked with economic development, and it's clear the state has no clue how to appeal to the younger generation.

Another example is the Coliseum development in New Haven. Here, you have a huge, prime PRIVATE project that could literally change the city, and it's is waiting on a comparatively small project to be funded by the state for the last 6 months. The fact that Malloy hasn't jumped on this is appalling.
 
Old 06-12-2014, 06:12 PM
 
Location: CT
2,122 posts, read 1,844,906 times
Reputation: 1653
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stylo View Post
The biggest thing the state needs to do in order to retain more young people is to better support the growth of its cities. Young people don't want to live in suburbs. They want vibrant walkable cities. Stamford is doing well and New Haven is starting to show promise but the state could still do much more. Austin has had so much support for its growth, both grassroots and from leadership.
This is kind of a 2 way street. You urbanize it too much and then once the young grow up and get married and have kids they want to move to the suburbs .The key is to find the balance. Cities are not the best family environment. Or maybe i'm just really uncool, but I feel most prefer better schools, safer neighborhoods, faster travel--no one way streets, less traffic and not having to pay to park everywhere on a day-to-day basis. That's all good and hip when your 18, but not sure how many 30 year olds with kids want that added to the daily grind
 
Old 06-12-2014, 06:22 PM
 
2,853 posts, read 2,685,745 times
Reputation: 1307
And all those young people will move back here once they want to start a family and have kids.
 
Old 06-12-2014, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
15,371 posts, read 19,126,095 times
Reputation: 3594
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigequinox View Post
This is kind of a 2 way street. You urbanize it too much and then once the young grow up and get married and have kids they want to move to the suburbs .The key is to find the balance. Cities are not the best family environment. Or maybe i'm just really uncool, but I feel most prefer better schools, safer neighborhoods, faster travel--no one way streets, less traffic and not having to pay to park everywhere on a day-to-day basis. That's all good and hip when your 18, but not sure how many 30 year olds with kids want that added to the daily grind
These days, people in their 30's still want to WORK and PLAY in an urban environment - even with families. They can commute, as most people already do. It can be incredibly dull to work in an isolated office park.
 
Old 06-12-2014, 06:47 PM
 
4,513 posts, read 4,449,242 times
Reputation: 1994
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigequinox View Post
This is kind of a 2 way street. You urbanize it too much and then once the young grow up and get married and have kids they want to move to the suburbs .The key is to find the balance. Cities are not the best family environment. Or maybe i'm just really uncool, but I feel most prefer better schools, safer neighborhoods, faster travel--no one way streets, less traffic and not having to pay to park everywhere on a day-to-day basis. That's all good and hip when your 18, but not sure how many 30 year olds with kids want that added to the daily grind
well, it also depends on the city. Houston is 627 square miles, according to wikipedia. So, there is plenty of room to have downtown Houston, and several other "business" oriented areas, while also having some great areas to live with excellent schools (BellAire), and also some not-so-great areas, and also just bad areas, all mixed in with lots of shopping, restaurants, strip malls, etc (no zoning in Houston) All of Middlesex County in Connecticut is a little over 400 square miles.

So, Houston is really like Hartford, West Hartford, East Hartford, Glastonbury, Simsbury, Avon, Bloomfield, Windsor, etc all rolled into one, and then quadrupled.

Of course, in Bellaire, you also have $600,000 for a 1,900 square foot home built in 1950 with no basement or attic, on a lot that is 1/5 of an acre and $9,000/year in property taxes. In Westport, I can find a 3,200 square foot home built in 1976 for $699,000 with a full basement and $8,600/year in property taxes on a 1.8 acre lot.

Last edited by NewJeffCT; 06-12-2014 at 07:05 PM..
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